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Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast

If you believe as I do that by uncovering tested, practical ways to help people move from functioning to flourishing at work, we can better navigate the incredible challenges and opportunities our world faces, then this podcast is for you. My goal each week is to give you access to the world’ leading positive psychology, positive organizational scholarship and neuroscience researchers and practitioners to explore their latest research findings on how you can improve wellbeing, develop strengths, nurture positive relationships, make work meaningful and cultivate the grit to accomplish what matters most. If you want evidence-based approaches to bringing out the best in yourself and others at work, then consider this podcast your step-by-step guide.
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Jan 14, 2021

In this week’s episode, we explore how to find our zone of fabulousness and the power of collective accountability in the face of work experiences that can lead to “burnout”.

Connect with Vikki Reynolds

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You’ll Learn:

  • [01:47] - Vikki explains why our approaches to vicarious trauma and burnout in workplaces need re-thinking.
  • [03:33] - Vikki shares how we can each find our Zone of Fabulousness when it comes to helping others at work.
  • [04:45] - Vikki explains why the goal of ‘safe enough’ rather than psychological safety may serve us better when it comes to sustaining connection with each other.
  • [08:26] - Vikki offers some tips to help us resist the politics of politeness and instead embrace the potential value of discord.
  • [10:45] - Vikki explains the power of collective accountability to enact our ethics.
  • [23:40] - Vikki enters the lightning round.

Thanks for listening!

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.

Please leave an honest review for the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.  And don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

You can also listen to all the episodes of Making Positive Psychology Work streamed directly to your smartphone or iPad through stitcher. No need for downloading or syncing.

Until next time, take care!  Thank you, Vikki!

Dec 17, 2020

Today we're talking to Michael Platt, a Penn Integrates Knowledge professor with appointments in the Department of Neuroscience, the Department of Psychology, and the Department of Marketing in the University of Pennsylvania. Michael works at the intersection of economics, psychology, and neuroscience, and he is a former president of The Society for Neuroeconomics. Michael's work has been featured in the New York Times, Washington Post, Wall Street Journal, Newsweek, The Guardian, and National Geographic and his new book is called The Leader's Brain.

In this week’s episode, we explore how understanding more about how our brain's work can help us to thrive at work.

Connect with Michael Platt:

You’ll Learn:

  • [01:47] - Michael shares why neuroscience is of relevance to leaders & workplaces
  • [03:33] - Michael shares why our brains crave a sense of certainty
  • [04:45] - Michael shows how leaders can create cohesive & effective teams
  • [08:26] - Michael shares how we can keep the social networks in our brain firing even when working remotely
  • [10:45] - Michael shares how our brain's processing capacity impacts our reality
  • [14:34] - Michael shares what leaders can do to communicate effectively given the brain's processing limitations
  • [20:41] - Michael shares ways that leaders can approach accountability, to help us have more productive outcomes
  • [22:18] - Michael shares how a leaders style of leadership can trigger a response in the brain
  • [23:40] - Michael enters the lightning round.

Thanks for listening!

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.

Please leave an honest review for the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.  And don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

You can also listen to all the episodes of Making Positive Psychology Work streamed directly to your smartphone or iPad through stitcher. No need for downloading or syncing.

Until next time, take care!  Thank you, Michael!

Dec 10, 2020

Today we’re talking to Jessica Amortegui, who’s the Senior Director of Learning & Development at LinkedIn where she designs and delivers programs for leaders and teams. Equipped with a conviction that we are all in beta-mode, Jess believes her work is much more than the opportunity to do what we do best. It’s a training ground to become our most evolved selves.

In this week’s episode, we explore how LinkedIn’s development programs are helping their leaders to pivot and embrace their vulnerability to improve performance.

Connect with Jess Amortegul:

You’ll Learn:

  • [02:38] - Jess explains how workplaces can create safe and effective training grounds for their people to become their most evolved selves.
  • [04:47] - Jess shares how we all get stuck sometimes in performing, pleasing, proving, and perfecting and the impact this has on how we show up to our work.
  • [06:51] - Jess outlines how LinkedIn has been helping its leaders to pivot during a year of extreme uncertainty and disruption.
  • [12:09] - Jess shares how LinkedIn is designing a new leadership program to help their leaders embrace their vulnerability.
  • [17:15] - Jess explains how LinkedIn is helping their leaders to turn their learnings about the importance of purpose, strengths, and vulnerability into consistent actions.
  • [27:16] - Jess enters the lightning round.

Thanks for listening!

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.

Please leave an honest review for the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.  And don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

You can also listen to all the episodes of Making Positive Psychology Work streamed directly to your smartphone or iPad through stitcher. No need for downloading or syncing.

Until next time, take care!  Thank you, Jess!

Dec 3, 2020

Today we’re talking to Professor Edgar Shein and Peter Shein. Ed and his son Peter together co-founded the Organizational Culture and Leadership Institute (OCLI.org) and have together published the award-winning Humble Leadership and Culture + Change + Leadership: The Corporate Culture Survival Guide, along with the upcoming second edition of Humble Inquiry that will be released in 2021.

Ed is Professor Emeritus of MIT’s Sloan School of Management. He holds a Ph.D. in Social Psychology from Harvard University, has consulted and published extensively, and has been the recipient of two-lifetime achievement awards. Peter’s unique work draws on 30 years of industry experience in marketing and corporate development at technology pioneers including Apple, SGI, Sun Microsystems, and numerous internet start-ups.

In this week’s podcast, we explore how humble leadership and humble inquiry can help to improve our workplace cultures.

Connect with Edgar & Peter Schein:

You’ll Learn:

  • [02:07] - Ed shares clarifies what is culture and how we can shape it.
  • [05:10] - Peter shares what Humble Leadership is and why it matters to workplaces and their culture.
  • [09:13] - Ed gives us an insight into what Humble Inquiry is and what role it plays in Humble Leadership.
  • [13:09] - Peter shares some of the barriers to inquiry.
  • [16:49] - Ed highlights some practical tips for growing an attitude and approach of Humble Inquiry in workplaces.
  • [22:18] - Peter shares where performance measurement and humble inquiry can collide.
  • [24:52] - Ed and Peter enter the lightning round.

Thanks for listening!

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.

Please leave an honest review for the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.  And don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

You can also listen to all the episodes of Making Positive Psychology Work streamed directly to your smartphone or iPad through stitcher. No need for downloading or syncing.

Until next time, take care!  Thank you, Edgar & Peter!

Nov 26, 2020

Today we’re talking to Dr. Margaret Heffernan, who’s an entrepreneur and the author of six books, including her most recent Uncharted: How To Map The Future. Margaret’s Ted talks have been seen by over 7 million people around the world. She is also the lead faculty for the Forward Institutes Responsible Leadership Program, and she mentors CEOs and senior executives of major global organizations.

In this week’s podcast, we explore the difference between complicated and complex systems, and how we can help people to care for their wellbeing as they navigate unpredictable and challenging work environments.

Connect with Dr. Margaret Heffernan:

You’ll Learn:

  • [02:33] - Margaret explains why studies suggest we can only confidently plan the future in workplaces for approximately 150 days at a time.
  • [06:29] - Margaret helps us explore the difference between a complicated world and a complex world and what this means for caring for wellbeing in workplaces.
  • [11:39] - Margaret provides an example of how workplaces can help people successfully navigate complexity.
  • [18:16] - Margaret outlines the capabilities we need to prioritize in workplaces to help people more confidently navigate complexity.
  • [22:03] - Margaret explains why thinking of ourselves as artists rather than managers may serve us better in the future in workplaces.
  • [27:47] - Margaret explores why thinking of ourselves as artists rather than managers may make us more resilient at work.
  • [31:22] - Margaret takes on the lightning round.

Thanks for listening!

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.

Please leave an honest review for the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.  And don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

You can also listen to all the episodes of Making Positive Psychology Work streamed directly to your smartphone or iPad through stitcher. No need for downloading or syncing.

Until next time, take care!  Thank you, Margaret!

Nov 19, 2020

Today we’re talking to Doctor Tim Lomas, a Senior Lecturer in Positive Psychology at the University of East London. Tim completed his Ph.D. with a thesis focusing on the impact of meditation on men’s health. And, since then, Tim has published over 70 papers and 11 books relating to wellbeing, linguistics, mindfulness, Buddhism, gender, art, cross-cul- cultural inquiry. His work has been featured in articles in prominent publications, like Time and The New Yorker.

In this week’s episode, we explore the third wave of positive psychology recently published in the Journal of Positive Psychology and what leaders can be saying and doing to help team members navigate the complexity of our time.

Connect with Tim Lomas:

You’ll Learn:

  • [02:21] - Tim explains the wave metaphor by sharing his views of the first wave when positive psychology was formalized as a field.
  • [03:09] - Tim explains the second wave.
  • [06:11] - Tim explains the third wave.
  • [09:25] - Tim explains what teams can be thinking about in riding the third wave.
  • [13:54] - Tim shares how his research on language fits into this third wave.
  • [15:49] - Tim shares how paying attention to words is important for cross-functional and global teams.
  • [17:59] - Tim takes on the lightning round.

Thanks for listening!

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.

Please leave an honest review for the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.  And don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

You can also listen to all the episodes of Making Positive Psychology Work streamed directly to your smartphone or iPad through stitcher. No need for downloading or syncing.

Until next time, take care!  Thank you Tim!

Nov 12, 2020

In this week’s podcast, we discover how to soar into your individual or collective purpose at work with four simple but powerful questions to help us navigate uncertainty.

Connect with Jackie Stavros:

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You’ll Learn:

  • [02:51] - Jackie shares why purpose is so powerful in moments when work and life feel chaotic.
  • [05:31] - Jackie explains how an appreciative inquiry approach can help us to discover the best of what is and what is possible to surface our purpose.
  • [07:45] - Jackie gives us four simple questions to help us SOAR into our purpose.
  • [11:08] - Jackie shares an example of how the four SOAR questions can be used to surface your what and why.
  • [15:48] - Jackie explains how teams and workplaces can use the four SOAR questions to help surface a shared sense of purpose.
  • [18:33] - Jackie offers advice for aligning people’s individual purpose with the purpose of a team or organization.
  • [21:22] - Jackie shares how teams and workplaces drive radical change in 2021.
  • [23:56] - Jackie explains why it’s never too soon to reach for purpose in a team or workplace.
  • [25:51] - Jackie gives us an exercise to help keep our sense of purpose in balance so we don’t burn ourselves out.
  • [28:11] - Jackie completes the lightning round
  •  

Thanks for listening!

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.

Please leave an honest review for the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.  And don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

You can also listen to all the episodes of Making Positive Psychology Work streamed directly to your smartphone or iPad through stitcher. No need for downloading or syncing.

Until next time, take care!  Thank you Jackie!

Nov 5, 2020

In this week’s episode, we explore how building a personal highlight reel can be effective in understanding our strengths, and dan shares with us the results of his research on the impact this has for individuals and teams.

Connect with Dan Cable:

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You’ll Learn:

  • [02:39] - Dan shares why we may struggle putting our strengths to use in our daily lives
  • [04:23] - Dan explains the three-step process to the personal highlight reel
  • [07:10] - Dan explains why the personal hi-light reel is effective
  • [09:49] - Dan explains the impact that doing the personal highlight reel might have in your life
  • [13:57] - Dan shares the bottom-line outcomes for workplaces of focusing on people's strengths
  • [14:51] - Dan provides some tips to help us with self-reflection
  • [22:45] - Dan shares how creating a personal highlight reel helps us have an impact in the world
  • [24:26] - Dan describes some cautions and caveats to be aware of with the personal highlight reel
  • [26:17] - Dan completes the lightning round
  •  

Thanks for listening!

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.

Please leave an honest review for the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.  And don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

You can also listen to all the episodes of Making Positive Psychology Work streamed directly to your smartphone or iPad through stitcher. No need for downloading or syncing.

Until next time, take care!  Thank you Dan!

Oct 29, 2020

In this episode, we explore how it's possible to adapt and thrive, even under extreme circumstances at work and in life as Dan explains how two simple questions can move us towards a thrivers mindset that renews us, or a victim, bystander, or controller mindset that drains us.

Connect with Dan Diamond:

Website: dandiamondmd.com

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You’ll Learn:

  • [02:37] - Dan explains how power and purpose shape a thriver’s mindset and how it can improve our performance and wellbeing at work.
  • [04:40] - Dan shares how our victim, bystander, controller, and thriver mindsets get shaped and how we can free ourselves of mindsets that don’t serve us well.
  • [09:13] - Dan offers some practical steps we can take to move towards a thriver mindset more consistently at work.
  • [16:12] - Dan shares tips for how leaders can help their teams cultivate more thriver mindsets when times are tough.
  • [22.49] - Dan explains how we can be intelligent thrivers who don’t burn ourselves out in an effort to help others.
  • [25:12] - Dan Completes the Lightning round.

Your Resources:

Thanks for listening!

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.

Please leave an honest review for the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.  And don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

You can also listen to all the episodes of Making Positive Psychology Work streamed directly to your smartphone or iPad through stitcher. No need for downloading or syncing.

Until next time, take care!  Thank you Dan!

Oct 22, 2020

Today we’re talking to Doctors Peter and Susan Glaser, who have spent their lifetimes researching and teaching people how to connect through conscious communication. Life and business partners for 40 years, they have published three books, including the highly acclaimed Be Quiet, Be Heard: The Paradox of Persuasion, and more than 40 research articles, as well as working with Fortune 500 companies all over the world, including Microsoft, Facebook, and Sony to name a few.

In this week’s episode, we explore the simple skills that can improve our ability to listen in ways that help us to understand and persuade each other.

Connect with Peter & Susan Glaser:

You’ll Learn:

  • [02:37] - Peter and Susan explain why studies suggest that being quiet might be the most powerful way to persuade others.
  • [05:59] - Susan and Peter explain how different conversations at work require us to listen more to others.
  • [07:16] - Peter and Susan explain why listening can be so hard for so many of us.
  • [09:46] - Susan and Peter share some tips to help us really listen to understand rather than just making it sound like we’re listening.
  • [12:46] - Peter and Susan offer some practical tips for those of us who really struggle to listen even when we’re trying hard to give other people more talk time.
  • [15:37] - Susan and Peter explain how we can consciously communicate with each other when conversations are challenging.
  • [22:17] - Peter & Susan enter the lightning round.

Your Resources:

Thanks for listening! 

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.

Please leave an honest review of the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.  And don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

You can also listen to all the episodes of Making Positive Psychology Work streamed directly to your smartphone or iPad through stitcher. No need for downloading or syncing.

Until next time, take care!  Thank you, Peter & Susan!

Oct 15, 2020

Michele Zanini is the co-founder of the Management Lab, with the wonderful Gary Hamel where they help forward-thinking organizations become more resilient, innovative, and engaging places to work. Together, they recently wrote the bestselling book, Humanocracy, creating organizations, as amazing people inside of them, and their work is featured in the Harvard Business Review, the Financial Times, and The Wall Street Journal.

In this week’s episode, we explore the simple steps we can each take to make our workplaces more human-centered and less bureaucratic.

Connect with Michele Zanini:

You’ll Learn:

  • [04:33] - Michele explains what studies are finding about the value of embedding humanity over bureaucracy when it comes to caring for worker’s wellbeing and improving performance.
  • [11:16] - Michele offers some practical steps teams can take to move towards a more human-centric approach to working together.
  • [17:06] - Michele explains how you can create a movement in your workplace to be more human-centered.
  • [20:45] - Michele explains how leaders can help enable change activists across their workplace.
  • [25:03] - Michele enters the lightning round.

Your Resources:

Thanks for listening! 

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.

Please leave an honest review of the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.  And don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

You can also listen to all the episodes of Making Positive Psychology Work streamed directly to your smartphone or iPad through stitcher. No need for downloading or syncing.

Until next time, take care!  Thank you, Michele!

Oct 8, 2020

Today we’re talking to Professor David Clutterbuck, who is one of the early pioneers of developmental coaching and mentoring – and co-founder of the European Mentoring & Coaching Council. Author of more than 70 books, including the first evidence-based titles on coaching culture and team coaching, he is a visiting professor at four business schools. He also leads a global network of specialist mentoring and coaching training consultants, at Coaching and Mentoring International.

In this week’s podcast, we explore how to build a coaching culture.

Connect with Professor David Clutterbuck

You’ll Learn:

  • [02:29] - David shares the value of having a coaching culture.
  • [04:42] - David describes how mentoring is often wrongly described as advising.
  • [06:47] - David explains the place of teams in creating a coaching culture.
  • [09:22] - David explains what’s at the heart of building a team’s coaching ability.
  • [11:47] - David shares what immediate step we can take to grow our team’s coaching capability.
  • [12:25] - David shares how people can role model and grow a team coaching approach.
  • [14:43] - David shares how we can start taking a self-coaching approach with our teams.
  • [16:33] - David enters the lightning round.

Your Resources:

Thanks for listening! 

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.

Please leave an honest review of the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.  And don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

You can also listen to all the episodes of Making Positive Psychology Work streamed directly to your smartphone or iPad through stitcher. No need for downloading or syncing.

Until next time, take care!  Thank you, David!

Oct 2, 2020

Today we’re talking to Dr. Peggy Kern, who is an associate professor at the Center for Positive Psychology at the University of Melbourne’s Graduate School of Education. Peggy’s research is collaborative in nature and draws on a variety of methodologies to examine questions around who thrives in life and why, including understanding and measuring healthy functioning, identifying individual and social factors impacting life trajectories, and systems informed approaches to wellbeing. She has published three books and over 100 peer-reviewed articles and chapters.

In this week’s episode we explore the hot-off-the-research-desk findings of how workers are caring for their wellbeing after a year of continuous uncertainty and disruption, and the three simple skills we all need to thrive at work.

Connect with Peggy Kern

You’ll Learn:

  • [04:30] - Peggy shares what the latest data has found about caring for workers' wellbeing when the circumstances around us are dramatically changing.
  • [09:32] - Peggy explores how workers' ability to thrive and their confidence to navigate struggle impacts their wellbeing and resilience.
  • [13:20] - Peggy shares why when we measure wellbeing in workplaces and the impact of our efforts to help people to care for our wellbeing we need to see the people behind the numbers.
  • [17:06] - Peggy offers insights into how our wellbeing changes over time when we’re investing our energy and effort in caring for our wellbeing at work.
  • [19:14] - Peggy provides examples of three of the most important capabilities workplaces can invest in when it comes to helping workers to care for their wellbeing.
  • [26:57] - Peggy offers some tips for what workplaces can do practically to care for wellbeing at a systems level.
  • [29:15] - Peggycompletes the Lightning Round.

Your Resources:

Thanks for listening! 

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.

Please leave an honest review of the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.  And don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

You can also listen to all the episodes of Making Positive Psychology Work streamed directly to your smartphone or iPad through stitcher. No need for downloading or syncing.

Until next time, take care!  Thank you, Peggy!

Sep 25, 2020

Today we’re talking to Anne Scoular, a former diplomat, Citibank trained international banker, and organizational psychologist, who is recognized as one of the five leading experts in business coaching globally by the Harvard Business Review. Much in demand for her expertise, Anne has served on a number of expert panels and policy committees, and she is the author of The Financial Times Guide to Business Coaching.

In this week’s episode, we explore how coaching can transform leadership and organizations, and Anne helps us understand how we can bring a coaching mindset to the work that we do every day.

Connect with Anne Scoular:

You’ll Learn:

  • [01:41] - Anne explains how organizational coaching differs from mentoring and other types of coaching.
  • [03:21] - Anne explores why coaching is so important for leaders right now.
  • [04:51] - Anne talks us through her framework for different styles of coaching leaders can use.
  • [09:09] - Anne shares examples of the positive impact she has seen in organizations when leaders coach.
  • [12:33] - Ann explains how workplaces can build an organizational capacity for coaching.
  • [16:48] - Anne shares what we can do in our own workplaces to develop coaching capacity and skills
  • [17:50] - Anne completes the Lightning Round

Your Resources:

Thanks for listening! 

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.

Please leave an honest review of the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.  And don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

You can also listen to all the episodes of Making Positive Psychology Work streamed directly to your smartphone or iPad through stitcher. No need for downloading or syncing.

Until next time, take care!  Thank you, Anne!

Sep 18, 2020

Today we’re talking to Dominic Price who is the Work Futurist at Atlassian Software, an Australian multinational that develops products for software development, project management, and content management including our teams’ all-time favorite tool, Trello. Dom has responsibilities spanning seven global research and development centers, and he is the in house team doctor who helps Atlassian scale by being ruthlessly efficient and effective with one eye on the future, and he’s personally run hundreds of sessions with Atlassian’s teams globally to help them build healthy and high-performing teams.

In this week’s episode, we explore evidence-based, playful practices to improve the health and performance of teams – even in the midst of challenges.

Connect with Dominic Price:

You’ll Learn:

  • [02:22] - Dom shares his insights on some of the biggest changes that you think workplaces might face when it comes to trying to bring out the best in their people as they start to look ahead to 2021.
  • [05:41] - Dom explains how Atlassian are finding ways to bring out the best in their teams and create a better normal, in response to the challenges of COVID-19.
  • [11:45] - Dom explains how the changes in where people are working as a result of COVID-19 pose new diversity and inclusivity challenges for many workplaces.
  • [17:33] - Dom offers some tips for helping leaders shift their mindsets and embrace the creation of healthy and high performing teams as the most important of their role in workplaces.
  • [23:23] - Dom shares his favorite approaches to improve the health and performance of teams.
  • [28:41] - Dom explains why 75% of teams report being dysfunctional and how we can minimize the challenges that make workers feel this way.
  • [32:46] - Dom enters the lightning round.

Your Resources:

Thanks for listening! 

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.

Please leave an honest review of the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.  And don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

You can also listen to all the episodes of Making Positive Psychology Work streamed directly to your smartphone or iPad through stitcher. No need for downloading or syncing.

Until next time, take care!  Thank you, Dom!

Sep 11, 2020

Today we’re talking to Tal Ben-Shahar, a serial entrepreneur, a lecturer, and author, whose books have translated in more than 25 languages. You may know him from having taught two of the largest classes in Harvard University’s history, Positive Psychology and The Psychology of Leadership.

In this week’s episode, we learn important lessons from the most popular course at Harvard ten years later and what business leaders and practitioners can do to be more effective at positive psychology interventions.

Connect with Tal Ben Shahar:

You’ll Learn:

  • [02:06] - Tal explains why people were so interested in taking his psychology course at Harvard University ten years ago when it became the most popular course at the school.
  • [04:20] - Tal explains what gets lost when leaders do not know how to be well.
  • [07:03] - Tal shares some examples of what his students from ten years ago are doing differently as today’s leaders.
  • [11:33] - Tal explains the tipping point philosophy for change.
  • [14:56] - Tal explains his integrative whole-being model called SPIRE.
  • [17:06] - Tal explains what practitioners can keep in mind as they facilitate positive change in workplaces.
  • [21:49] - Tal explains what myths we need to be mindful of as we work to create positive change.
  • [27:29] - Tal enters the lightning round.

Your Resources:

Thanks for listening! 

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.

Please leave an honest review of the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.  And don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

You can also listen to all the episodes of Making Positive Psychology Work streamed directly to your smartphone or iPad through stitcher. No need for downloading or syncing.

Until next time, take care!  Thank you, Tal!

Sep 7, 2020

Today we’re talking to Dr. Lindsey Godwin, who is a professor of management at the Stiller School of Business at Champlain College in Vermont, and the academic director of the David L. Cooperrider Center for Appreciative Inquiry. A practitioner and possibility-iser, Lindsey has a passion for helping individuals and organizations leverage their potential through strength-based change and is a sought after international speaker, consultant, and facilitator whose work has been published in a variety of journals and books, and presented at conferences around the world.

In this week’s episode, we discover the three things workplaces are doing to successfully navigate change even in the midst of uncertainty and disruption.

Connect with Dr. Lindsey Godwin:

You’ll Learn:

  • [03:19] - Lindsey shares the most intriguing findings from a new study of 1,400 Australian workers on how they are navigating change during this very uncertain and unusual time.
  • [05:27] - Lindsey explains why despite the fact that it is often reported most workplace changes fail, so many participants in the current study reported that their teams and workplaces were thriving despite COVID and economic disruption.
  • [10:56] - Lindsey shares why the way we measure the success of change in most workplaces fails to capture the complex and iterative nature of changing human behavior.
  • [15:43] - Lindsey explains how leaders can help their people navigate change more successfully.
  • [20:25] - Lindsey explains when a tell-and-control change approach from leaders can be beneficial in workplaces.
  • [23:40] - Lindsey shares why our ability to have coaching conversations with others might positively impact the outcomes we’re able to achieve and our wellbeing.
  • [26:29] - Lindsey enters the lightning round.

Your Resources:

Thanks for listening! 

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.

Please leave an honest review of the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.  And don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

You can also listen to all the episodes of Making Positive Psychology Work streamed directly to your smartphone or iPad through stitcher. No need for downloading or syncing.

Until next time, take care!  Thank you, Lindsey!

Aug 28, 2020

Today we’re talking to Dr. Gail Gazelle, who is a former hospice physician, part-time Harvard Medical School Assistant Professor, and Master Certified Coach for physicians. Over the past decade, Gail has coached hundreds of physician leaders on leadership development, mindfulness, and building resilience. Her passion is to provide physicians the resilience skills not covered in training that make the difference between burnout and surviving the marathon of a medical career. Gail is also a long-time mindfulness practitioner and teacher and has recently released a book called – ‘Everyday Resilience. A Practical Guide to Build Inner Strength and Weather Life’s Challenges ’.

In this week’s podcast, we explore how we can reduce burnout in our workplaces.

Connect with Dr. Gail Gazelle:

You’ll Learn:

  • [02:01] - Gail shares what’s leading to physician burnout.
  • [04:05] - Gail paints a picture of burnout culture for physicians and what it can cost them.
  • [05:31] - Gail shares how the pandemic has changed the world of physicians.
  • [06:56] - Gail explores why coaching is an effective method of supporting people in high burnout professions.
  • [09:53] - Gail shares three things leaders and coaches should be focusing on when it comes to supporting people facing burnout.
  • [12:51] - Gail puts a spotlight on how we can build a culture that reduces burnout.
  • [15:05] - Gail shares the most essential thing we should be aware of in the face of burnout.
  • [17:15] - Gail highlights one thing everyone should start doing today to grow their resilience to buffer against burnout.
  • [18:30] - Gail enters the lightning round.

Your Resources:

Thanks for listening! 

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.

Please leave an honest review of the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.  And don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

You can also listen to all the episodes of Making Positive Psychology Work streamed directly to your smartphone or iPad through stitcher. No need for downloading or syncing.

Until next time, take care!  Thank you, Gail!

Aug 21, 2020

In this week’s podcast, we explore how to integrate our brains to care for our wellbeing and enhance our performance at work – especially when we’re feeling uncertain or insecure.

Connect with Dan Siegel:

[free_product_purchase id="89473"]

You’ll Learn:

  • [03:15] - Dan explains why interpersonal neurobiology offers important insights for all of us when it comes to caring for wellbeing in workplaces.
  • [06:20] - Dan offers some tips for helping leaders to understand the potential practical impacts of harnessing interpersonal neurobiology as we work.
  • [08:01] - Dan explains why we need to integrate all the parts of our brains in order to care for our wellbeing and improve our performance at work.
  • [11:45] - Dan provides some practical, easy-to-apply examples to help integrate the different parts of your brain as you work.
  • [16:24] - Dan shares some tips on how we can create better neurological integration in our relationships with others as we work.
  • [19:17] - Dan shares how leaders can help people feel seen, safe, soothed, and secure as we work together.
  • [24:15] - Dan offers some recommendations on the role of leaders as more people experience and share their traumas in workplaces – for example as a result of COVID.
  • [29:13] - Dan completes the Lightning Round.

Your Resources:

Thanks for listening! 

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.

Please leave an honest review of the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.  And don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

You can also listen to all the episodes of Making Positive Psychology Work streamed directly to your smartphone or iPad through stitcher. No need for downloading or syncing.

Until next time, take care!  Thank you, Dan!

Aug 14, 2020

In this week’s episode, we explore how traditional models of organizing in workplaces stifle innovation and creativity. Gary helps us understand what we can do to fuel collaboration, resilience, and leadership in our workplaces.

Connect with Gary Hamel:

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You’ll Learn:

  • [02:56] - Gary explains how we can recognize ways in which bureaucracy stifles creativity and innovation in our own organizations and contexts.
  • [05:08] - Gary describes what human-centric principles can look like in organizations.
  • [10:23] - Gary explains the Humanocracy principle of Ownership.
  • [14:28] - Gary explains the Humanocracy principle of Meritocracy.
  • [17:03] - Gary explains the Humanocracy principle of Markets.
  • [19:41] - Gary explains the Humanocracy principle of Community.
  • [21:55] - Gary explains the Humanocracy principle of Openness.
  • [23:48] - Gary explains the Humanocracy principle of Experimentation.
  • [23:48] - Gary explains the Humanocracy principle of Paradox.
  • [23:48] - Gary suggests how we can start to help our own workplaces become more human-centered.
  • [23:48] - Gary provides caveats and cautions as we help to create more humanocratic workplaces.
  • [26:17] - Gary completes the Lightning Round.

Your Resources:

Thanks for listening! 

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.

Please leave an honest review of the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.  And don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

You can also listen to all the episodes of Making Positive Psychology Work streamed directly to your smartphone or iPad through stitcher. No need for downloading or syncing.

Until next time, take care!  Thank you, Gary!

Aug 7, 2020

Jody Hoffer Gittell is a professor at Brandeis University Heller School for Social Policy and Management. Jody's research explores how people contribute to high-performance outcomes through their coordination with each other, and she's the Executive Director of the Relational Coordination Research Collaborative and Principal Investigator of the Relational Society Project. Jody, in these roles, brings together scholars and practitioners to build relational coordination for positive impact all over the world.

In this week’s episode, we explore how we can collaborate more effectively and joyfully as we work together, even in the midst of uncertainty and disruption.

Connect with Jody Hoffer Gittell:

You’ll Learn:

  • [02:56] - Jody explains the process of relational coordination and how it can help us bring out the best in each other in workplaces.
  • [05:08] - Jody shares the research findings from more than 70 empirical papers on the potential benefits of relational coordination in workplaces.
  • [10:23] - Jody offers some tips for leaders to support better relational coordination in their teams.
  • [14:28] - Jody explains how workplaces can support leaders in moments of crisis to reach for relational – rather than technical – responses.
  • [17:03] - Jody shares her thoughts on how leaders can balance the need for control and autonomy in our relationships during periods of crisis.
  • [19:41] - Jody explains how relational co-ordination approaches can help us navigate change more confidently and effectively.
  • [21:55] - Jody offers tips for creating shared goals in teams and workplaces.
  • [23:48] - Jody shares how teams can create shared accountability around their goals.
  • [26:17] - Jody enters the lightning round.

Your Resources:

Thanks for listening! 

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.

Please leave an honest review of the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.  And don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

You can also listen to all the episodes of Making Positive Psychology Work streamed directly to your smartphone or iPad through stitcher. No need for downloading or syncing.

Until next time, take care!  Thank you, Jody!

Jul 31, 2020

Today we're talking to Dr. Paige Williams, co-founder of the Leaders Lab, an honorary fellow, and researcher at the Center for Positive Psychology at the University of Melbourne. Paige works to create practical evidence-based pathways that use the latest research in neuroscience, positive psychology, leadership, and systems thinking to help leaders leverage their energy, attitudes, and mindsets to benefit from the dynamic, complex, and uncertain environment in which most organizations now operate.

She is determined to help leaders move beyond just the need for resilience so that they can become anti-fragile. This is the focus of her new book, Becoming Anti-fragile, Learning to Thrive Through Disruption, Challenge, and Change, which we're going to explore together today.

In this week’s episode, we explore how we can leverage the physical, emotional, and mental energy, attitude and mindsets of anti-fragility to create positive change.

Connect with Dr. Paige Williams:

You’ll Learn:

  • [02:30] - Paige explains what antifragility is and why it is important.
  • [04:27] - Paige shares some real-life examples of antifragility in action.
  • [07:14] - Paige explains the robust principles that we can use as touchstones to becoming antifragility.
  • [09:45] - Paige explains why energy, attitude, and mindsets are the building blocks to being antifragile.
  • [13:17] - Paige explains the nuances of energy – the physical, mental and emotional components.
  • [15:10] - Paige describes antifragile attitudes.
  • [17:43] - Paige describes the antifragile mindset.
  • [21:17] - Paige explains how to scale up antifragile principles and building blocks for teams and organizational systems.
  • [26:00] - Paige enters the lightning round.

Your Resources:

Thanks for listening! 

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.

Please leave an honest review of the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.  And don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

You can also listen to all the episodes of Making Positive Psychology Work streamed directly to your smartphone or iPad through stitcher. No need for downloading or syncing.

Until next time, take care!  Thank you, Paige!

Jul 24, 2020

Today we’re talking to Robert Emmons, who’s a professor of psychology at the University of California. Bob’s research focuses on the Psychology of Gratitude and joy as they relate to human flourishing and wellbeing. Bob has authored over 200 original publications in peer-reviewed journals or chapters written or edited eight books, including The Psychology of Gratitude. He is a frequent speaker at professional conferences and public events and has his groundbreaking work on gratitude featured in dozens of popular media outlets all over the world. Bob is also the founding editor and editor in chief of The Journal of Positive Psychology.

In this week’s episode, we explore how the practice of gratitude can help us care for wellbeing in workplaces and the practical things leaders and teams can do to practice affirmation and recognition of each other.

Connect with Robert Emmons:

You’ll Learn:

  • [02:30] - Bob defines gratitude for us.
  • [04:27] - Bob shares some of the common misunderstandings people have about gratitude when it comes to improving wellbeing.
  • [07:14] - Bob explains the bottom-line benefits for prioritizing gratitude in workplaces.
  • [09:45] - Bob shares what recent studies have found in terms of how gratitude works neurologically.
  • [13:17] - Bob explains how the practice of gratitude can help leaders and teams feel psychologically safe.
  • [15:10] - Bob offers some tips for how the best ways to express gratitude in workplaces.
  • [17:43] - Bob offers some advice to ensure our expressions of gratitude are authentic.
  • [21:17] - Bob shares what the research is finding in terms of the most effective forms of expressing gratitude.
  • [26:00] - Bob enters the lightning round.

Your Resources:

Thanks for listening! 

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.

Please leave an honest review of the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.  And don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

You can also listen to all the episodes of Making Positive Psychology Work streamed directly to your smartphone or iPad through stitcher. No need for downloading or syncing.

Until next time, take care!  Thank you, Bob!

Jul 16, 2020

Today we’re talking to professor Christian Van Nieuwerburgh. Christian is a leading academic and practitioner in the field of coaching in education. He’s a professor of coaching and positive psychology at the University of East London and executive director of Growth Coaching International, a Sydney based global coaching provider for the education sector.

In this week’s podcast, we explore the skills and art that enable us to be effective coaches.

Connect with Christian Van Nieuwerburgh:

You’ll Learn:

  • [02:55] - Christian explains what makes coaching so effective for development and growing wellbeing.
  • [05:12] - Christian shares the top two skills coaches should develop.
  • [07:25] - Christian shares the ‘art’ of coaching and how we can lean into this opportunity to make our coaching more effective.
  • [13:30] - Christian highlights what coaches should be considered when supporting people faced with uncertainty and disruption.
  • [37:20] - Christian enters the lightning round.

Your Resources:

Thanks for listening! 

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.

Please leave an honest review of the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.  And don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

You can also listen to all the episodes of Making Positive Psychology Work streamed directly to your smartphone or iPad through stitcher. No need for downloading or syncing.

Until next time, take care!  Thank you, Christian!

Jul 10, 2020

Today we’re talking to Dr. Judith Beck, who is a clinical professor of psychology at the University of Pennsylvania and the president of the Beck Institute for Cognitive Behavior Therapy.
Judith is a prolific author, clinician, and educator in the field of mental health, and has written several books for professionals and for consumers about cognitive behavior therapy, made hundreds of presentations around the world, and continues to treat clients through Beck Institute’s in-house clinic, and has won numeral awards for her contributions to the field of CBT.

In this week’s podcast, we explore how cognitive behavior therapy can be safely used in workplaces to help leaders and staff care for their wellbeing.

Connect with Judith Beck:

https://beckinstitute.org/

You’ll Learn:

  • [02:13] - Judith explains what cognitive behavior therapy is and provides an example of how it can support our wellbeing.
  • [06:20] - Judith shares some of the research findings on the benefits of cognitive behavior therapy when it comes to caring for our wellbeing.
  • [09:08] - Judith explains how cognitive behavior therapy has changed over the last decade to tap into research on motivation, purpose, and resilience.
  • [13:38] - Judith offers some examples of how cognitive behavior therapy can be safely used in workplaces – particularly in the midst of COVID-19.
  • [18:04] - Judith provides three tips on how we can use cognitive behavior therapy to care for our own wellbeing at work.
  • [23:05] - Judith enters for the lightning round.

Your Resources:

Thanks for listening! 

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.

Please leave an honest review of the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.  And don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

You can also listen to all the episodes of Making Positive Psychology Work streamed directly to your smartphone or iPad through stitcher. No need for downloading or syncing.

Until next time, take care!  Thank you, Judith!

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