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Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast

If you believe as I do that by uncovering tested, practical ways to help people move from functioning to flourishing at work, we can better navigate the incredible challenges and opportunities our world faces, then this podcast is for you. My goal each week is to give you access to the world’ leading positive psychology, positive organizational scholarship and neuroscience researchers and practitioners to explore their latest research findings on how you can improve wellbeing, develop strengths, nurture positive relationships, make work meaningful and cultivate the grit to accomplish what matters most. If you want evidence-based approaches to bringing out the best in yourself and others at work, then consider this podcast your step-by-step guide.
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Sep 25, 2020

Today we’re talking to Anne Scoular, a former diplomat, Citibank trained international banker, and organizational psychologist, who is recognized as one of the five leading experts in business coaching globally by the Harvard Business Review. Much in demand for her expertise, Anne has served on a number of expert panels and policy committees, and she is the author of The Financial Times Guide to Business Coaching.

In this week’s episode, we explore how coaching can transform leadership and organizations, and Anne helps us understand how we can bring a coaching mindset to the work that we do every day.

Connect with Anne Scoular:

You’ll Learn:

  • [01:41] - Anne explains how organizational coaching differs from mentoring and other types of coaching.
  • [03:21] - Anne explores why coaching is so important for leaders right now.
  • [04:51] - Anne talks us through her framework for different styles of coaching leaders can use.
  • [09:09] - Anne shares examples of the positive impact she has seen in organizations when leaders coach.
  • [12:33] - Ann explains how workplaces can build an organizational capacity for coaching.
  • [16:48] - Anne shares what we can do in our own workplaces to develop coaching capacity and skills
  • [17:50] - Anne completes the Lightning Round

Your Resources:

Thanks for listening! 

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.

Please leave an honest review of the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.  And don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

You can also listen to all the episodes of Making Positive Psychology Work streamed directly to your smartphone or iPad through stitcher. No need for downloading or syncing.

Until next time, take care!  Thank you, Anne!

Sep 18, 2020

Today we’re talking to Dominic Price who is the Work Futurist at Atlassian Software, an Australian multinational that develops products for software development, project management, and content management including our teams’ all-time favorite tool, Trello. Dom has responsibilities spanning seven global research and development centers, and he is the in house team doctor who helps Atlassian scale by being ruthlessly efficient and effective with one eye on the future, and he’s personally run hundreds of sessions with Atlassian’s teams globally to help them build healthy and high-performing teams.

In this week’s episode, we explore evidence-based, playful practices to improve the health and performance of teams – even in the midst of challenges.

Connect with Dominic Price:

You’ll Learn:

  • [02:22] - Dom shares his insights on some of the biggest changes that you think workplaces might face when it comes to trying to bring out the best in their people as they start to look ahead to 2021.
  • [05:41] - Dom explains how Atlassian are finding ways to bring out the best in their teams and create a better normal, in response to the challenges of COVID-19.
  • [11:45] - Dom explains how the changes in where people are working as a result of COVID-19 pose new diversity and inclusivity challenges for many workplaces.
  • [17:33] - Dom offers some tips for helping leaders shift their mindsets and embrace the creation of healthy and high performing teams as the most important of their role in workplaces.
  • [23:23] - Dom shares his favorite approaches to improve the health and performance of teams.
  • [28:41] - Dom explains why 75% of teams report being dysfunctional and how we can minimize the challenges that make workers feel this way.
  • [32:46] - Dom enters the lightning round.

Your Resources:

Thanks for listening! 

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.

Please leave an honest review of the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.  And don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

You can also listen to all the episodes of Making Positive Psychology Work streamed directly to your smartphone or iPad through stitcher. No need for downloading or syncing.

Until next time, take care!  Thank you, Dom!

Sep 11, 2020

Today we’re talking to Tal Ben-Shahar, a serial entrepreneur, a lecturer, and author, whose books have translated in more than 25 languages. You may know him from having taught two of the largest classes in Harvard University’s history, Positive Psychology and The Psychology of Leadership.

In this week’s episode, we learn important lessons from the most popular course at Harvard ten years later and what business leaders and practitioners can do to be more effective at positive psychology interventions.

Connect with Tal Ben Shahar:

You’ll Learn:

  • [02:06] - Tal explains why people were so interested in taking his psychology course at Harvard University ten years ago when it became the most popular course at the school.
  • [04:20] - Tal explains what gets lost when leaders do not know how to be well.
  • [07:03] - Tal shares some examples of what his students from ten years ago are doing differently as today’s leaders.
  • [11:33] - Tal explains the tipping point philosophy for change.
  • [14:56] - Tal explains his integrative whole-being model called SPIRE.
  • [17:06] - Tal explains what practitioners can keep in mind as they facilitate positive change in workplaces.
  • [21:49] - Tal explains what myths we need to be mindful of as we work to create positive change.
  • [27:29] - Tal enters the lightning round.

Your Resources:

Thanks for listening! 

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.

Please leave an honest review of the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.  And don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

You can also listen to all the episodes of Making Positive Psychology Work streamed directly to your smartphone or iPad through stitcher. No need for downloading or syncing.

Until next time, take care!  Thank you, Tal!

Sep 7, 2020

Today we’re talking to Dr. Lindsey Godwin, who is a professor of management at the Stiller School of Business at Champlain College in Vermont, and the academic director of the David L. Cooperrider Center for Appreciative Inquiry. A practitioner and possibility-iser, Lindsey has a passion for helping individuals and organizations leverage their potential through strength-based change and is a sought after international speaker, consultant, and facilitator whose work has been published in a variety of journals and books, and presented at conferences around the world.

In this week’s episode, we discover the three things workplaces are doing to successfully navigate change even in the midst of uncertainty and disruption.

Connect with Dr. Lindsey Godwin:

You’ll Learn:

  • [03:19] - Lindsey shares the most intriguing findings from a new study of 1,400 Australian workers on how they are navigating change during this very uncertain and unusual time.
  • [05:27] - Lindsey explains why despite the fact that it is often reported most workplace changes fail, so many participants in the current study reported that their teams and workplaces were thriving despite COVID and economic disruption.
  • [10:56] - Lindsey shares why the way we measure the success of change in most workplaces fails to capture the complex and iterative nature of changing human behavior.
  • [15:43] - Lindsey explains how leaders can help their people navigate change more successfully.
  • [20:25] - Lindsey explains when a tell-and-control change approach from leaders can be beneficial in workplaces.
  • [23:40] - Lindsey shares why our ability to have coaching conversations with others might positively impact the outcomes we’re able to achieve and our wellbeing.
  • [26:29] - Lindsey enters the lightning round.

Your Resources:

Thanks for listening! 

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.

Please leave an honest review of the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.  And don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

You can also listen to all the episodes of Making Positive Psychology Work streamed directly to your smartphone or iPad through stitcher. No need for downloading or syncing.

Until next time, take care!  Thank you, Lindsey!

Aug 28, 2020

Today we’re talking to Dr. Gail Gazelle, who is a former hospice physician, part-time Harvard Medical School Assistant Professor, and Master Certified Coach for physicians. Over the past decade, Gail has coached hundreds of physician leaders on leadership development, mindfulness, and building resilience. Her passion is to provide physicians the resilience skills not covered in training that make the difference between burnout and surviving the marathon of a medical career. Gail is also a long-time mindfulness practitioner and teacher and has recently released a book called – ‘Everyday Resilience. A Practical Guide to Build Inner Strength and Weather Life’s Challenges ’.

In this week’s podcast, we explore how we can reduce burnout in our workplaces.

Connect with Dr. Gail Gazelle:

You’ll Learn:

  • [02:01] - Gail shares what’s leading to physician burnout.
  • [04:05] - Gail paints a picture of burnout culture for physicians and what it can cost them.
  • [05:31] - Gail shares how the pandemic has changed the world of physicians.
  • [06:56] - Gail explores why coaching is an effective method of supporting people in high burnout professions.
  • [09:53] - Gail shares three things leaders and coaches should be focusing on when it comes to supporting people facing burnout.
  • [12:51] - Gail puts a spotlight on how we can build a culture that reduces burnout.
  • [15:05] - Gail shares the most essential thing we should be aware of in the face of burnout.
  • [17:15] - Gail highlights one thing everyone should start doing today to grow their resilience to buffer against burnout.
  • [18:30] - Gail enters the lightning round.

Your Resources:

Thanks for listening! 

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.

Please leave an honest review of the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.  And don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

You can also listen to all the episodes of Making Positive Psychology Work streamed directly to your smartphone or iPad through stitcher. No need for downloading or syncing.

Until next time, take care!  Thank you, Gail!

Aug 21, 2020

In this week’s podcast, we explore how to integrate our brains to care for our wellbeing and enhance our performance at work – especially when we’re feeling uncertain or insecure.

Connect with Dan Siegel:

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You’ll Learn:

  • [03:15] - Dan explains why interpersonal neurobiology offers important insights for all of us when it comes to caring for wellbeing in workplaces.
  • [06:20] - Dan offers some tips for helping leaders to understand the potential practical impacts of harnessing interpersonal neurobiology as we work.
  • [08:01] - Dan explains why we need to integrate all the parts of our brains in order to care for our wellbeing and improve our performance at work.
  • [11:45] - Dan provides some practical, easy-to-apply examples to help integrate the different parts of your brain as you work.
  • [16:24] - Dan shares some tips on how we can create better neurological integration in our relationships with others as we work.
  • [19:17] - Dan shares how leaders can help people feel seen, safe, soothed, and secure as we work together.
  • [24:15] - Dan offers some recommendations on the role of leaders as more people experience and share their traumas in workplaces – for example as a result of COVID.
  • [29:13] - Dan completes the Lightning Round.

Your Resources:

Thanks for listening! 

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.

Please leave an honest review of the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.  And don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

You can also listen to all the episodes of Making Positive Psychology Work streamed directly to your smartphone or iPad through stitcher. No need for downloading or syncing.

Until next time, take care!  Thank you, Dan!

Aug 14, 2020

In this week’s episode, we explore how traditional models of organizing in workplaces stifle innovation and creativity. Gary helps us understand what we can do to fuel collaboration, resilience, and leadership in our workplaces.

Connect with Gary Hamel:

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You’ll Learn:

  • [02:56] - Gary explains how we can recognize ways in which bureaucracy stifles creativity and innovation in our own organizations and contexts.
  • [05:08] - Gary describes what human-centric principles can look like in organizations.
  • [10:23] - Gary explains the Humanocracy principle of Ownership.
  • [14:28] - Gary explains the Humanocracy principle of Meritocracy.
  • [17:03] - Gary explains the Humanocracy principle of Markets.
  • [19:41] - Gary explains the Humanocracy principle of Community.
  • [21:55] - Gary explains the Humanocracy principle of Openness.
  • [23:48] - Gary explains the Humanocracy principle of Experimentation.
  • [23:48] - Gary explains the Humanocracy principle of Paradox.
  • [23:48] - Gary suggests how we can start to help our own workplaces become more human-centered.
  • [23:48] - Gary provides caveats and cautions as we help to create more humanocratic workplaces.
  • [26:17] - Gary completes the Lightning Round.

Your Resources:

Thanks for listening! 

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.

Please leave an honest review of the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.  And don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

You can also listen to all the episodes of Making Positive Psychology Work streamed directly to your smartphone or iPad through stitcher. No need for downloading or syncing.

Until next time, take care!  Thank you, Gary!

Aug 7, 2020

Jody Hoffer Gittell is a professor at Brandeis University Heller School for Social Policy and Management. Jody's research explores how people contribute to high-performance outcomes through their coordination with each other, and she's the Executive Director of the Relational Coordination Research Collaborative and Principal Investigator of the Relational Society Project. Jody, in these roles, brings together scholars and practitioners to build relational coordination for positive impact all over the world.

In this week’s episode, we explore how we can collaborate more effectively and joyfully as we work together, even in the midst of uncertainty and disruption.

Connect with Jody Hoffer Gittell:

You’ll Learn:

  • [02:56] - Jody explains the process of relational coordination and how it can help us bring out the best in each other in workplaces.
  • [05:08] - Jody shares the research findings from more than 70 empirical papers on the potential benefits of relational coordination in workplaces.
  • [10:23] - Jody offers some tips for leaders to support better relational coordination in their teams.
  • [14:28] - Jody explains how workplaces can support leaders in moments of crisis to reach for relational – rather than technical – responses.
  • [17:03] - Jody shares her thoughts on how leaders can balance the need for control and autonomy in our relationships during periods of crisis.
  • [19:41] - Jody explains how relational co-ordination approaches can help us navigate change more confidently and effectively.
  • [21:55] - Jody offers tips for creating shared goals in teams and workplaces.
  • [23:48] - Jody shares how teams can create shared accountability around their goals.
  • [26:17] - Jody enters the lightning round.

Your Resources:

Thanks for listening! 

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.

Please leave an honest review of the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.  And don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

You can also listen to all the episodes of Making Positive Psychology Work streamed directly to your smartphone or iPad through stitcher. No need for downloading or syncing.

Until next time, take care!  Thank you, Jody!

Jul 31, 2020

Today we're talking to Dr. Paige Williams, co-founder of the Leaders Lab, an honorary fellow, and researcher at the Center for Positive Psychology at the University of Melbourne. Paige works to create practical evidence-based pathways that use the latest research in neuroscience, positive psychology, leadership, and systems thinking to help leaders leverage their energy, attitudes, and mindsets to benefit from the dynamic, complex, and uncertain environment in which most organizations now operate.

She is determined to help leaders move beyond just the need for resilience so that they can become anti-fragile. This is the focus of her new book, Becoming Anti-fragile, Learning to Thrive Through Disruption, Challenge, and Change, which we're going to explore together today.

In this week’s episode, we explore how we can leverage the physical, emotional, and mental energy, attitude and mindsets of anti-fragility to create positive change.

Connect with Dr. Paige Williams:

You’ll Learn:

  • [02:30] - Paige explains what antifragility is and why it is important.
  • [04:27] - Paige shares some real-life examples of antifragility in action.
  • [07:14] - Paige explains the robust principles that we can use as touchstones to becoming antifragility.
  • [09:45] - Paige explains why energy, attitude, and mindsets are the building blocks to being antifragile.
  • [13:17] - Paige explains the nuances of energy – the physical, mental and emotional components.
  • [15:10] - Paige describes antifragile attitudes.
  • [17:43] - Paige describes the antifragile mindset.
  • [21:17] - Paige explains how to scale up antifragile principles and building blocks for teams and organizational systems.
  • [26:00] - Paige enters the lightning round.

Your Resources:

Thanks for listening! 

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.

Please leave an honest review of the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.  And don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

You can also listen to all the episodes of Making Positive Psychology Work streamed directly to your smartphone or iPad through stitcher. No need for downloading or syncing.

Until next time, take care!  Thank you, Paige!

Jul 24, 2020

Today we’re talking to Robert Emmons, who’s a professor of psychology at the University of California. Bob’s research focuses on the Psychology of Gratitude and joy as they relate to human flourishing and wellbeing. Bob has authored over 200 original publications in peer-reviewed journals or chapters written or edited eight books, including The Psychology of Gratitude. He is a frequent speaker at professional conferences and public events and has his groundbreaking work on gratitude featured in dozens of popular media outlets all over the world. Bob is also the founding editor and editor in chief of The Journal of Positive Psychology.

In this week’s episode, we explore how the practice of gratitude can help us care for wellbeing in workplaces and the practical things leaders and teams can do to practice affirmation and recognition of each other.

Connect with Robert Emmons:

You’ll Learn:

  • [02:30] - Bob defines gratitude for us.
  • [04:27] - Bob shares some of the common misunderstandings people have about gratitude when it comes to improving wellbeing.
  • [07:14] - Bob explains the bottom-line benefits for prioritizing gratitude in workplaces.
  • [09:45] - Bob shares what recent studies have found in terms of how gratitude works neurologically.
  • [13:17] - Bob explains how the practice of gratitude can help leaders and teams feel psychologically safe.
  • [15:10] - Bob offers some tips for how the best ways to express gratitude in workplaces.
  • [17:43] - Bob offers some advice to ensure our expressions of gratitude are authentic.
  • [21:17] - Bob shares what the research is finding in terms of the most effective forms of expressing gratitude.
  • [26:00] - Bob enters the lightning round.

Your Resources:

Thanks for listening! 

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.

Please leave an honest review of the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.  And don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

You can also listen to all the episodes of Making Positive Psychology Work streamed directly to your smartphone or iPad through stitcher. No need for downloading or syncing.

Until next time, take care!  Thank you, Bob!

Jul 16, 2020

Today we’re talking to professor Christian Van Nieuwerburgh. Christian is a leading academic and practitioner in the field of coaching in education. He’s a professor of coaching and positive psychology at the University of East London and executive director of Growth Coaching International, a Sydney based global coaching provider for the education sector.

In this week’s podcast, we explore the skills and art that enable us to be effective coaches.

Connect with Christian Van Nieuwerburgh:

You’ll Learn:

  • [02:55] - Christian explains what makes coaching so effective for development and growing wellbeing.
  • [05:12] - Christian shares the top two skills coaches should develop.
  • [07:25] - Christian shares the ‘art’ of coaching and how we can lean into this opportunity to make our coaching more effective.
  • [13:30] - Christian highlights what coaches should be considered when supporting people faced with uncertainty and disruption.
  • [37:20] - Christian enters the lightning round.

Your Resources:

Thanks for listening! 

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.

Please leave an honest review of the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.  And don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

You can also listen to all the episodes of Making Positive Psychology Work streamed directly to your smartphone or iPad through stitcher. No need for downloading or syncing.

Until next time, take care!  Thank you, Christian!

Jul 10, 2020

Today we’re talking to Dr. Judith Beck, who is a clinical professor of psychology at the University of Pennsylvania and the president of the Beck Institute for Cognitive Behavior Therapy.
Judith is a prolific author, clinician, and educator in the field of mental health, and has written several books for professionals and for consumers about cognitive behavior therapy, made hundreds of presentations around the world, and continues to treat clients through Beck Institute’s in-house clinic, and has won numeral awards for her contributions to the field of CBT.

In this week’s podcast, we explore how cognitive behavior therapy can be safely used in workplaces to help leaders and staff care for their wellbeing.

Connect with Judith Beck:

https://beckinstitute.org/

You’ll Learn:

  • [02:13] - Judith explains what cognitive behavior therapy is and provides an example of how it can support our wellbeing.
  • [06:20] - Judith shares some of the research findings on the benefits of cognitive behavior therapy when it comes to caring for our wellbeing.
  • [09:08] - Judith explains how cognitive behavior therapy has changed over the last decade to tap into research on motivation, purpose, and resilience.
  • [13:38] - Judith offers some examples of how cognitive behavior therapy can be safely used in workplaces – particularly in the midst of COVID-19.
  • [18:04] - Judith provides three tips on how we can use cognitive behavior therapy to care for our own wellbeing at work.
  • [23:05] - Judith enters for the lightning round.

Your Resources:

Thanks for listening! 

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.

Please leave an honest review of the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.  And don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

You can also listen to all the episodes of Making Positive Psychology Work streamed directly to your smartphone or iPad through stitcher. No need for downloading or syncing.

Until next time, take care!  Thank you, Judith!

Jul 4, 2020

Today we’re talking to Margaret Wheatley, Co-founder and President of The Berkana Institute, an organizational consultant since 1973, a global citizen since her youth and a prolific writer.

Meg began caring about the world’s peoples in 1966 as a Peace Corps volunteer in postwar Korea. She received her doctorate in organizational behavior from Harvard University in 1979 just as the field of OD was forming and has been honored for her groundbreaking work by many professional associations, universities, and organizations. She has authored nine books, including the classic leadership and the new science and of my personal favorite, Who Do We Choose To Be?

For the past five years, Meg has been training leaders and activists from 35 countries as Warriors for the Human Spirit, an in-depth training program and path of service supported by a robust global community. Her most recent work is a CD, The Warrior Songline, A Journey into Warriorship Guided by Voice and Sound.

In this week’s episode, we explore the challenges and opportunities for leaders in the world right now when their ability to control uncertainty has never been more challenging. Meg helps us understand how leaders can adjust their approaches to have a more positive impact on their people and their workplaces.

Connect with Meg Wheatley:

You’ll Learn:

  • [02:55] - Meg describes what the challenges and opportunities are for leaders in the world right now.
  • [05:12] - Meg explains why traditional models and thinking about leadership are no longer relevant.
  • [07:25] - Meg describes how leaders need to be warriors of the human spirit
  • [13:30] - Meg explores why leaders who show care, compassion and appreciation bring out the best in themselves and others
  • [19:06] - Meg describes the ‘enlightened leadership’ that is needed in the world right now
  • [21:59] - Meg outlines three elements to ‘enlightened leadership’
  • [27:25] - Meg describes the importance of context for ‘enlightened leadership’
  • [28:41] - Meg explains how leaders can consciously choose to be warriors of the human spirit
  • [30:58] - Meg relieves us of the burden of being ‘change-makers’ for other leaders
  • [33:55] - Meg introduces us to Islands of Sanity
  • [37:20] - Meg enters for the lightning round.

Your Resources:

Thanks for listening! 

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.

Please leave an honest review of the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.  And don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

You can also listen to all the episodes of Making Positive Psychology Work streamed directly to your smartphone or iPad through stitcher. No need for downloading or syncing.

Until next time, take care!  Thank you, Meg!

Jun 26, 2020

Sheila Heen is an expert on managing difficult negotiations, a lecturer on law at Harvard Law School, and a founder of Triad Consulting. Sheila often partners with executive teams, helping them work through conflict, repair working relationships, and make sound decisions together and her clients include Apple, HSBC, Unilever, and Pixar among others. She is the co-author of the New York Times business bestseller Difficult Conversations: How To Discuss What Matters Most and more recently Thanks For The Feedback: The Science and Art of Receiving Feedback Well (Even When It’s Off-Base, Unfair, Poorly Delivered and Frankly, You’re Not in the Mood).

In this week’s podcast, we explore why receiving feedback can be so challenging at work, and how we can unhook from our feedback triggers to make the most of the gift we are being given.

Connect with Sheila Heen:

You’ll Learn:

  • [02:45] - Sheila explains why learning to receive feedback is a skill that we should all be building.
  • [05:29] - Sheila outlines the research findings on how being able to receive feedback impacts people’s performance and wellbeing at work.
  • [07:37] - Sheila shares the three different triggers that can make hearing feedback difficult to hear.
  • [11:26] - Sheila explains the three different types of feedback people are given at work and why it helps to be clear about the purpose of the feedback we’re giving and receiving.
  • [16:07] - Sheila offers tips for us to be present and really hear and make the most of the feedback we’re given.
  • [20:04] - Sheila explores how growth mindsets can help us lean into giving and receiving feedback better.
  • [24:09] - Sheila explains why the ability of leaders to receive feedback well helps to improve psychological safety in teams.
  • [26:33] - Sheila enters for the lightning round.

Your Resources:

Thanks for listening! 

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.

Please leave an honest review of the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.  And don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

You can also listen to all the episodes of Making Positive Psychology Work streamed directly to your smartphone or iPad through stitcher. No need for downloading or syncing.

Until next time, take care!  Thank you, Sheila!

Jun 19, 2020

Cliff Kayser is a consultant who brings 25 years of experience with senior-level OD internal positions with the Washington Post and the National Cooperative Bank, as well as his external consultancies and coaching practice with experienced and successful partners, polarity partnerships and the Institute for the Polarities of Democracy. Cliff is on faculty at American university’s master’s in OD, and a coaching fellow for George Mason University Center for the Advancement of well-being, which is where he and I met.

In this week’s episode, we explore how to balance “either/or” thinking with the need for “and” so we honor competing polarities when it comes to the way we work together.

Connect with Cliff Kayser:

You’ll Learn:

  • [01:40] - Cliff explains what polarity thinking is and why it matters in workplaces.
  • [02:26] - Cliff offers some examples of the common polarities workplaces have been grappling with over the last 12 months.
  • [03:38] - Cliff explains how teams and workplaces can navigate the polarities of “me and we” and “us and them”.
  • [06:07] - Cliff provides an example of how a healthcare company has navigated the polarities of centralized and decentralized resources.
  • [10:05] - Cliff shares a case study on polarities of how Charleston Police Department navigate the tension of law enforcement and community engagement.
  • [15:47] - Cliff explains why polarity thinking is common sense but not common practice.
  • [18:32] - Cliff shares where OR thinking can be useful.
  • [22:48] - Louis asks cliff if he’s ready for the lightning round.

Your Resources:

Thanks for listening! 

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.

Please leave an honest review of the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.  And don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

You can also listen to all the episodes of Making Positive Psychology Work streamed directly to your smartphone or iPad through stitcher. No need for downloading or syncing.

Until next time, take care!  Thank you, Cliff!

Jun 12, 2020

Valorie Burton is the founder and CEO of the Coaching and Positive Psychology Institute and a best-selling author, international speaker, and life strategist. Valorie has a master’s in applied positive psychology from the University of Pennsylvania, and her company provides coaching, coach training, and resilience training and has served clients in all 50 American states and 15 countries on six continents. Since 1999, she has written 13 books on personal development, including the best sellers Successful Women Think Differently and What’s Really Holding You Back? And she’s been featured in media outlets around the world.

In this week’s episode, we explore how to practice racial empathy in workplaces and the simple steps workers can take to be respectful and effective white allies.

Connect with Valorie Burton:

You’ll Learn:

  • [03:13] - Valorie explains how the murder of George Floyd caused her to speak out on the need for racial empathy.
  • [07:28] - Valorie shares why in order to become unstuck on the issue of racism in workplaces we need to start telling the truth.
  • [11:29] - Valorie helps us understand why it often difficult for people of color to talk about what’s happening and the impact that racism has on them at work.
  • [15:07] - Valorie offers suggestions for how white allies can help better support people of color in their workplace.
  • [21:39] - Valorie provides some tips for how people of color – if they wish – can encourage white allies to take action.
  • [25:16] - Valorie explains people of color often don’t need help from white allies but do need them to listen.
  • [29:46] - Valorie enters the lightning round.

Your Resources:

Thanks for listening! 

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.

Please leave an honest review of the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.  And don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

You can also listen to all the episodes of Making Positive Psychology Work streamed directly to your smartphone or iPad through stitcher. No need for downloading or syncing.

Until next time, take care!  Thank you, Valorie!

Jun 5, 2020

Dr. Suzy Green is a Clinical and Coaching Psychologist – and Founder & CEO of The Positivity Institute, a positively deviant organization dedicated to the research and application of Positive Psychology for life, school, and work. She is a leader in the complementary fields of Coaching Psychology and Positive Psychology, was the recipient of an International Positive Psychology Fellowship Award, has lectured on Applied Positive Psychology as a Senior Adjunct Lecturer in the Coaching Psychology Unit, at the University of Sydney for ten years, and is an Honorary Vice President of the International Society for Coaching Psychology. On top of all of that, Suzy has just released her brand new book called – The Positivity Prescription.

In this week’s podcast, we explore what ‘wellbeing coaching’ is and how we can make this more accessible in workplaces.

Connect with Suzy Green:

You’ll Learn:

  • [02:42] - Suzy shares what wellbeing coaching is and how it differs from other types of coaching.
  • [04:39] - Suzy paints a picture of what a wellbeing coaching experience might be like.
  • [06:33] - Suzy explains what makes coaching particularly effective when it comes to improving people’s wellbeing.
  • [08:50] - Suzy highlights what might be holding back workplaces from engaging wellbeing coaching.
  • [11:10] - Suzy how we might make coaching more accessible to workplaces.
  • [13:19] - Suzy discusses the questions and cautions we should be considering when it comes to offering group coaching.
  • [16:05] - Suzy shares the three Ms for building positivity.
  • [18:04] - Suzy shares practical ways to enhance our mindfulness, mindset, and mood.
  • [21:12] - Suzy enters the lightning round.

Your Resources:

Thanks for listening! 

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.

Please leave an honest review of the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.  And don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

You can also listen to all the episodes of Making Positive Psychology Work streamed directly to your smartphone or iPad through stitcher. No need for downloading or syncing.

Until next time, take care!  Thank you, Suzy!

May 29, 2020

Al Comeaux is a former executive at Travelocity, GE, American airlines. As a senior leader, Al has championed change across a range of workplaces and undertaken a 20-year journey researching why so many change efforts fail and what's needed for success.

Al is the founder of Primed For Change, a disruptive project to prepare leaders to take organizations successfully through change, and this week he has released a new book called Change Management.

In this episode, we explore how senior leaders think about change in workplaces and how they can balance being SMART with taking an approach that wins people’s HEARTS.

Connect with Al Comeaux:

You’ll Learn:

  • [02:58] - Al explains what most often takes leaders by surprise when it comes to trying to successfully create change in workplaces.
  • [06:23] - Al helps us explore if leaders should be more focused on understanding the problems or the opportunities for change in their organization.
  • [07:44] - Al offers tips for helping leaders to consistently explain the opportunity for change across their workplace, whilst allowing teams to make the change personally meaningful.
  • [09:43] - Al offers guidance on when leaders should try a top-down versus open source approach to leading change.
  • [14:52] - Al provides examples of how leaders can be SMART and have HEART when it comes to leading change.
  • [18:24] - Al offers examples leaders model the change consistently.
  • [22:31] - Al offers some tips for turning around the change cynics.

Your Resources:

Thanks for listening! 

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.

Please leave an honest review of the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.  And don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

You can also listen to all the episodes of Making Positive Psychology Work streamed directly to your smartphone or iPad through stitcher. No need for downloading or syncing.

Until next time, take care!  Thank you, Al!

May 22, 2020

Mandy O'Neill, Ph.D. is an Associate Professor of Management at the George Mason University School of Business and a Senior Scientist at the University Center for the Advancement of Wellbeing. Mandy holds a doctorate in Organizational Behavior from Stanford University Graduate School of Business where she was a National Science Foundation graduate fellow and is an expert on organizational culture, immersions in the workplace, and women's careers.

Mandy consults and conducts academic research across a wide range of organizations, including Fortune 500 corporations, global technology firms, major medical centers, and emergency response teams. Her work has been published in a variety of scholarly and practitioner journals, including Administrative Science Quarterly, Academy of Management Journal, Fast Company, Wall Street Journal, Business Insider, and the Harvard Business Review.

In this episode, we look at the headlines of the Wellbeing Lab research from the US and the importance of a culture of companionate love in workplaces.

Connect with Mandy O'Neill:

You’ll Learn:

  • [03:50] - Mandy shares an overview of the most recent Wellbeing Lab research results from the US.
  • [11:23] - Mandy explains what companionate love is and the impact it has on workplaces.
  • [14:28] - Mandy explains the difference between cognitive and emotional culture.
  • [17:28] - Mandy shares the impact that leaders demonstrating companionate love has in workplaces.
  • [21:22] - Mandy suggests ways leaders can build a culture of companionate love.
  • [26:08] - Mandy enters the lightning round.

Your Resources:

Thanks for listening! 

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.

Please leave an honest review of the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.  And don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

You can also listen to all the episodes of Making Positive Psychology Work streamed directly to your smartphone or iPad through stitcher. No need for downloading or syncing.

Until next time, take care!  Thank you, Mandy!

May 15, 2020

In this week’s podcast we explore relational agency, and the four simple skills you can build in your teams to listen deeply, lift each other, and turn challenges around.

Connect with Arne Carlsen:

You’ll Learn:

  • [03:25] - Arne explains what relational agency is and why it matters when it comes to our wellbeing and performance at work.
  • [07:08] - Arne outlines how we can build more respectful engagement in our relationships at work.
  • [10:30] - Arne shares how we can practice generative resistance and healthy conflict with each other at work.
  • [13:08] - Arne outlines how liberating laughter compliments generative resistance and how we can create more of it in workplaces.
  • [16:27] - Arne offers tips for cultivating psychological safety within ourselves and our relationships.
  • [18:46] - Arne explains how the Best Reflected Self exercise can help us discover our strengths and improve our relationships.
  • [23:35] - Arne shares how leaders have introduced these relational agency skills successfully to their teams...
  • [25:10] - Arne enters the lightning round.

Your Resources:

Thanks for listening! 

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.

Please leave an honest review of the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.  And don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

You can also listen to all the episodes of Making Positive Psychology Work streamed directly to your smartphone or iPad through stitcher. No need for downloading or syncing.

Until next time, take care!  Thank you, Arne!

May 8, 2020

In this week’s episode, Scott Barry Kaufman talks about his new book, “Transcend: The New Science of Self Actualization” in which he unearths some of Dr. Abraham Maslow’s unfinished work. He shares common misconceptions on the hierarchy of needs, how workplaces can support collective actualization, and why it is important to stay positive at this time of COVID 19—even amidst uncertainty or suffering. Scott brings in familiar psychology research to create a case for how leaders can be more enlightened in their approaches.

Connect with Dr. Scott Kaufman:

You’ll Learn:

  • [03:41] - Scott explains Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs theory and why there is a misconception in using the pyramid metaphor.
  • [07:09] - Scott explains how we can use the ideas and resources in his book at a time of global pandemic.
  • [12:52] - Scott explains how values play a part in creating transcendent workers and workplaces.
  • [17:59] - Scott shares how workplaces can help team members create more moments for integration and actualization.
  • [22:35] - Scott enters the lightning round.

Your Resources:

Thanks for listening! 

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.

Please leave an honest review of the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.  And don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

You can also listen to all the episodes of Making Positive Psychology Work streamed directly to your smartphone or iPad through stitcher. No need for downloading or syncing.

Until next time, take care!  Thank you, Scott!

May 1, 2020

Warren Nilsson is an associate professor of social innovation at the University of Cape Town Graduate School of Business and the faculty associate of the Bertha Centre for Social Innovation. He’s also the co-founder of Organisation Unbounded, an international community of inquiry and experimentation, exploring how social purpose organizations can more closely align their internal practices and cultures with their external social change goals. Warren has worked with social purpose organizations in North America, Africa, and South Asia connecting his academic research with practitioner-driven social initiatives.

In this week’s podcast, we explore what any workplace can learn from social change organizations about the two unique steps they take to create positive change inside and outside of their workplaces.

Connect with Warren Nilsson:

You’ll Learn:

  • [03:08] - Warren explains how learning to successfully create social change can help to transform any organization.
  • [05:22] - Warren shares what his research has been finding to help any workplace create more positive change in the world.
  • [07:42] - Warren outlines why workplaces need to work more in the social field if they want to have a positive impact on the world.
  • [12:53] - Warren shares how psychological safety and high-quality connections offer practical insights and tools to help us create social fields that help to create social change.
  • [15:33] - Warren offers some tips on what the best social purpose organizations do to align their external purpose with the internal ways they bring out the best in their staff.
  • [22:54] - Warren explains how workplaces can create cultures of listening and connecting people to what they are feeling.
  • [29:17] - Warren explains why scaling questions rather than scaling solutions often offers a more effective pathway for creating social change.
  • [35:01] - Warren enters the lightning round.

Your Resources:

Thanks for listening! 

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.

Please leave an honest review of the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.  And don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

You can also listen to all the episodes of Making Positive Psychology Work streamed directly to your smartphone or iPad through stitcher. No need for downloading or syncing.

Until next time, take care!  Thank you, Warren!

Apr 24, 2020

Anne is a Change Professional who has managed change programs across multiple industries, from large scale systems implementations through to workplace transformations, with a focus on changing cultures and building internal business change capability. For the last seven years, Anne has been bringing wellbeing into her change programs with fabulous results and has been referred to as “the Magic Maker”.

In this week’s episode, we explore the practical actions workplaces can be taking to care for their people’s wellbeing during a time of disruption and rapid change.

Connect with Anne Lomax:

You’ll Learn:

  • [01:50] - Anne shares how the CoVID-19 pandemic impacted Qantas as a workplace.
  • [02:24] - Anne’s essential first step to supporting people during a disruption.
  • [03:23] - Anne’s number one priority for worker wellbeing during the CoVID-19 disruption.
  • [03:54] - Simple, practical ways to support wellbeing during a disruption.
  • [05:51] - What goes into a daily calm session?
  • [08:22] - Anne’s biggest learning on wellbeing during change.
  • [09:19] - The ‘new normal’ of workplace wellbeing
  • [10:19] - Anne enters the lightning round

Your Resources:

Thanks for listening! 

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.

Please leave an honest review of the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.  And don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

You can also listen to all the episodes of Making Positive Psychology Work streamed directly to your smartphone or iPad through stitcher. No need for downloading or syncing.

Until next time, take care!  Thank you, Anna!

Apr 17, 2020

Bruce Daisley was previously Twitter’s most senior employee outside of the United States in his role as Vice President across Europe, the Middle East, and Africa. Bruce’s passion for improving work led him to create the podcast Eat Sleep Work Repeat on using evidence-based approaches to make work better and he’s recently released a book of the same name.

In today’s podcast, we explore how leaders can help bring out the best in their teams as more workers suddenly find themselves working remotely.

Connect with Bruce Daisley:

You’ll Learn:

  • [02:48] - Bruce shares some of the evidence-based practices that helped him to bring out the best in himself and his teams at Twitter.
  • [07:20] - Bruce shares Twitter’s invitation to #lovewhereyouwork and why as a leader this became his priority.
  • [11:33] - Bruce offers some practical tips for staying physically distanced but socially connected with each other at work.
  • [14:54] - Bruce explains how we can manage the stress that comes with working more remotely.
  • [18:07] - Bruce offers some examples of how teams can build and maintain psychological safety with each other.
  • [22:55] - Bruce shares why positive effect and laughter helps teams to be in sync with each other and what we can do to create more laughter our workplaces.
  • [24:32] - Bruce enters the lightning round

Your Resources:

Thanks for listening! 

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.

Please leave an honest review of the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.  And don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

You can also listen to all the episodes of Making Positive Psychology Work streamed directly to your smartphone or iPad through stitcher. No need for downloading or syncing.

Until next time, take care!  Thank you, Bruce!

Apr 10, 2020

Dr. Adam Fraser is a human performance researcher and consultant who studies how organizations adopt a high-performance culture to thrive in this challenging and evolving business landscape. Adam has worked with elite athletes, the armed forces and business professionals of all levels. In the last eight years, he has delivered more than 1200 presentations to over 300,000 people in Australia, New Zealand, and Asia. Adam is also the author of four best-selling books, including his latest one, Strive, which I’m looking forward to delving into today.

In this episode, we explore the benefits of struggle when it comes to our learning and growth and the four practical steps we can take to get more comfortable with struggle.

Connect with Adam Fraser:

You’ll Learn:

  • [02:35] - Adam shares what enables us to strive
  • [06:46] - Adam talks about why we need to make struggle our friend
  • [07:55] - Adam explains about the value of negative emotions
  • [12:26] - Adam introduces foreground and background behaviors that support striving.
  • [13:24] - Adam outlines the SAFE foreground behaviors and how we can learn to sit with discomfort.
  • [18:13] - Adam offers tips for accepting our struggle without judgment.
  • [23:29] - Adam shares how the focus of our struggle can be development, learning, and growth.
  • [26:53] - Adam explains how we can engage in the most constructive behaviors even in the midst of struggle.
  • [34:11] - Adam enters the lightning round

Your Resources:

Thanks for listening! 

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.

Please leave an honest review of the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.  And don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

You can also listen to all the episodes of Making Positive Psychology Work streamed directly to your smartphone or iPad through stitcher. No need for downloading or syncing.

Until next time, take care!  Thank you, Adam!

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