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Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast

If you believe as I do that by uncovering tested, practical ways to help people move from functioning to flourishing at work, we can better navigate the incredible challenges and opportunities our world faces, then this podcast is for you. My goal each week is to give you access to the world’ leading positive psychology, positive organizational scholarship and neuroscience researchers and practitioners to explore their latest research findings on how you can improve wellbeing, develop strengths, nurture positive relationships, make work meaningful and cultivate the grit to accomplish what matters most. If you want evidence-based approaches to bringing out the best in yourself and others at work, then consider this podcast your step-by-step guide.
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Apr 2, 2020

Dr. Peggy Kern is an associate professor at the Centre for Positive Psychology at the University of Melbourne’s graduate school of education. Peggy’s research is collaborative in nature and draws on a variety of methodologies to examine questions around who thrives in life and why. Including understanding and measuring healthy functioning, identifying individual and social factors impacting life trajectories and systems informed approaches to wellbeing. She’s published three books and over 85 peer-reviewed articles and chapters.

In this week’s podcast, we explore the impact COVID-19 and the economic downturn is having on workers’ wellbeing and performance, and what leaders and workplaces can be doing to support them.

Connect with Peggy Kern:

You’ll Learn:

  • [02:45] - Peggy shares her latest research findings on how workplaces can help workers to care for their wellbeing.
  • [11:03] - Peggy explains what research over the last two weeks has found about the impact of COVID-19 and the sudden economic downturn is having on workers' wellbeing and performance.
  • [15:28] - Peggy provides insights into why some workers are thriving even though they are experiencing high levels of worry and anxiety at the moment.
  • [18:19] - Peggy offers tips to help workers thrive even in the face of struggle and how this may shift over time.
  • [22:28] - Peggy explains why as workers grieve through the changes that are happening that workplaces and leaders can make it ok to talk about the struggles they are experiencing.
  • [24:04] - Peggy offers guidance for HR teams are why to focus their resources and efforts during this unpredictable time to support workers’ wellbeing.
  • [27:25] - Peggy enters the lightning round

Your Resources:

Thanks for listening! 

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.

Please leave an honest review of the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.  And don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

You can also listen to all the episodes of Making Positive Psychology Work streamed directly to your smartphone or iPad through stitcher. No need for downloading or syncing.

Until next time, take care!  Thank you, Peggy!

Mar 26, 2020

Dr. Michelle McQuaid and Dr. Paige Williams are the co-founders of The Leaders Lab, which helps leaders to thrive and create thriving workplaces. They use evidence-based approaches that draw on the latest research in neuroscience, positive psychology, leadership, and systems thinking to help leaders and workplaces move beyond just the need for resilience, to become antifragile.

In this week’s podcast, we explore the practical steps leaders can take to be more neurologically robust and antifragile, so they can help themselves and their teams thrive during this time of unprecedented disruption and change.

Connect with Dr. Michelle McQuaid & Dr. Paige Williams:

You’ll Learn:

  • [02:50] - Michelle shares hot-off-the-research-desk data about the impact coronavirus and the economic downturn is having for leaders and their teams.
  • [06:06] - Michelle and Paige explore how leaders can be antifragile and thrive even during this time of great unpredictably and disruption.
  • [10:48] - Michelle and Paige explore why leaders need a coaching style of leadership to support themselves and others amidst the challenges they are facing right now.
  • [13:23] - Michelle and Paige explain how leaders can recruit their brains to manage the anxiety and fear that they and their teams may be feeling at the moment.
  • [14:19] - Michelle and Paige provide tips on how leaders and their teams can operate in reality without catastrophizing unnecessarily.
  • [18:28] - Michelle and Paige explore how leaders can break the negative and build the positive for their teams in these uncertain times.
  • [21:36] - Michelle and Paige explain how leaders and their teams can use intelligent risk to quickly learn and grow in the face of the unprecedented changes they are experiencing.
  • [25:35] - Michelle and Paige offer tips on how to seek collective wisdom across a team even when more and more people are having to work virtually.
  • [30:03] - Michelle and Paige explore how leaders can tackle the infinite game so on the other side of coronavirus and economic downturns they and their teams are able to maximize what they’ve learned during this challenging period.
  • [34:49] - Michelle enters the lightning round

Your Resources:

Thanks for listening! 

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.

Please leave an honest review of the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.  And don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

You can also listen to all the episodes of Making Positive Psychology Work streamed directly to your smartphone or iPad through stitcher. No need for downloading or syncing.

Until next time, take care!  Thank you, Michelle!

Mar 19, 2020

In this week’s podcast, we explore how pro-social principles and tools can help groups collaborate more effectively together by creating safe spaces, to be honest about what they want, what they fear, and how this shapes the way they choose to work together.

Connect with Paul Atkins: 

You’ll Learn:

  • [02:32] - Paul explains why collaborating with each other is often challenging at work.
  • [04:18] - Paul shares why we often struggle to appreciate the differences in each other.
  • [05:40] - Paul outlines the prosocial process and how it might help us to collaborate better with each other.
  • [07:48] - Paul outlines the eight-core design principles that guide the prosocial process.
  • [16:58] - Paul shares an example of how the prosocial principals and tools can be applied in workplaces.
  • [23:36] - Paul offers some simple questions we can use to help create more prosocial ways of working together.
  • [27:45] - Paul offers some tips for dysfunctional teams to become more prosocial and collaborate better together.
  • [30:26] - Paul enters the lightning round

Your Resources:

Thanks for listening! 

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.

Please leave an honest review of the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.  And don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

You can also listen to all the episodes of Making Positive Psychology Work streamed directly to your smartphone or iPad through stitcher. No need for downloading or syncing.

Until next time, take care!  Thank you, Paul!

Mar 12, 2020

In this week’s episode, Dr. Michelle McQuaid explains the 5 evidence-based MAGIC factors that make p positive change possible in workplaces, and how you can activate these in your own work or across your whole workplace.

Connect with Michelle Mcquaid: 

You’ll Learn:

  • [02:37] - Michelle explains what positive change is and why it should be our goal in workplaces.
  • [04:09] - Michelle outlines the 5 evidence-based MAGIC factors for creating positive change.
  • [10:56] - Michelle shares how her virtual global team embeds the MAGIC factors to create positive changes together.
  • [15:07] - Michelle shares why workplaces often struggle with generative conversations and self-organization.
  • [21:18] - Michelle offers some tips for people who feel they have little control over how change unfolds in their workplace.
  • [24:43] - Michelle enters the lightning round

Your Resources:

Thanks for listening! 

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.

Please leave an honest review of the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.  And don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

You can also listen to all the episodes of Making Positive Psychology Work streamed directly to your smartphone or iPad through stitcher. No need for downloading or syncing.

Until next time, take care!  Thank you Michelle!

Mar 5, 2020

Stewart Friedman is an organizational psychologist at Wharton and founder of Wharton’s Leadership Program and it’s work-life integration project. Listed among HR magazine’s most influential international thinkers, Stewart has written two best sellers, Leading The Life You Want and Total Leadership. And his newest book, which is about to be released, is Parents Who Lead.

In this week’s podcast, we explore the practical steps we can take to integrate our work and our life to create four-way wins across our career, our family, our community and ourselves (mind, body, spirit) and the impact this has on our wellbeing and performance at work.

Connect with Stewart Friedman: 

You’ll Learn:

  • [02:18] - Stew explains how we can create four-way wins by integrating our careers, our family, our community, and our own needs to improve wellbeing and performance.
  • [06:29] - Stew offers some practical tips to help us improve the integration of our career, our family, our community and ourselves.
  • [14:33] - Stew outlines how peer coaching in workplaces can be used to help people become more confident and motivated to experiment with integration across their career, family, community, and self.
  • [19:31] - Stew explains how we can lead better in our families and the impact this has on our work.
  • [25:31] - Stew offers tips for asking workplace leaders for the support we need to create the win-win outcomes we need to better integrate our careers, our families, our community and ourselves.
  • [28:15] - Stew completes the Lightning Round.

Your Resources:

Thanks for listening! 

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.

Please leave an honest review of the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.  And don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

You can also listen to all the episodes of Making Positive Psychology Work streamed directly to your smartphone or iPad through stitcher. No need for downloading or syncing.

Until next time, take care!  Thank you Stew!

Feb 27, 2020

Peter Block is an author and citizen of Cincinnati, Ohio. He is the author of nine books including Community: The Structure of Belonging, The Abundant Community with John McKnight and coauthor of An Other Kingdom. His work is in the restoration of the common good and creating a world that reclaims our humanity from the onslaught of modernism.

In this week’s episode, Peter Block explains why listening and connecting are the core leadership strategies needed in workplaces today, how to work with cynics, and what the key questions and conversations have been in his work as an organizational turned community development practitioner-scholar.

Connect with Peter Block: 

You’ll Learn:

  • [03:32] - Peter explains why listening is a core capacity needed in workplaces today and why being a role model or visionary leader is not necessary.
  • [06:58] - Peter explains what conversations are necessary in shifting organizational narratives.
  • [08:58] - Peter shares how he assesses whether an organization is ready to have a new more positive change conversation.
  • [11:30] - Peter explains what helps him understand concepts like emergence and complex adaptive systems.
  • [12:31] - Peter explains why it’s important to live with uncertainty and side with the cynics.
  • [15:01] - Peter shares why creating wellbeing and change is all about connection.
  • [15:37] - Peter completes the Lightning Round.

Your Resources:

Thanks for listening! 

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.

Please leave an honest review of the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.  And don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

You can also listen to all the episodes of Making Positive Psychology Work streamed directly to your smartphone or iPad through stitcher. No need for downloading or syncing.

Until next time, take care!  Thank you Peter!

Feb 20, 2020

Dr. Kelly McGonigal is a health psychologist and lecturer at Stanford University. As a pioneer in the field of science help, her mission is to translate insights from psychology and neuroscience into practical strategies that support personal wellbeing and strengthen communities.
Kelly is the author of several books, including the international bestseller, The Willpower Instinct, and The Upside of Stress and her newest book is The Joy of Movement.

In this week’s episode, we explore the latest research on why movement – not just exercise – is so important for our wellbeing and the simple, joyful ways we can get moving more.

Connect with Kelly McGonigal: 

You’ll Learn:

  • [02:17] - Kelly shares the latest research findings on why movement is so important for our wellbeing.
  • [05:23] - Kelly explains why we don’t have to exercise in order to enjoy the wellbeing benefits that come from moving.
  • [11:30] - Kelly shares some of the latest research on how high-intensity movement – like running – helps to fuel endocannabinoids which improve our ability for social connection.
  • [15:49] - Kelly explains how long-term regular exercise helps to build hope molecules that help us recover from trauma or depression and improves our levels of resilience.
  • [15:49] - Kelly helps us understand how calm synchronized movements, even when we’re sitting down, can increase our pain tolerance and improve our sense of connection.
  • [15:49] - Kelly offers some tips for how workplaces can help their workers to move more.
  • [22:48] - Kelly completes the Lightning Round.

Your Resources:

Thanks for listening! 

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.

Please leave an honest review of the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.  And don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

You can also listen to all the episodes of Making Positive Psychology Work streamed directly to your smartphone or iPad through stitcher. No need for downloading or syncing.

Until next time, take care!  Thank you Kelly!

Feb 13, 2020

Dr. Michelle McQuaid is known for her research, books, and tools, which help people create positive changes and thrive more consistently in their workplaces.  Michelle holds a Master in Positive Psychology, and a Ph.D. on how Appreciative Inquiry Summits create positive disruptions that enable systems to flourish, and is a co-founder of The Change Lab.

In this week’s episode, we explore how leaders and workplaces can tackle complex challenges and create positive changes through the use of language, conversations, and self-organization.

Connect with Dr. Michelle McQuaid: 

You’ll Learn:

  • [02:17] - Michelle shares her thoughts on the ability for the latest research in human flourishing to help create positive changes given all the challenges our world faces at the moment.
  • [05:23] - Michelle shares some tips for workplaces to create more positive changes.
  • [11:30] - Michelle outlines the simple actions leaders can take to make change a more positive experience.
  • [15:49] - Michelle shares a simple learning loop exercise to help anyone create change in their workplace – regardless of their job title.
  • [22:48] - Michelle completes the Lightning Round.

Your Resources:

Thanks for listening! 

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.

Please leave an honest review of the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.  And don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

You can also listen to all the episodes of Making Positive Psychology Work streamed directly to your smartphone or iPad through stitcher. No need for downloading or syncing.

Until next time, take care!  Thank you Michelle!

Feb 6, 2020

Today we're talking to Tom Rath, an author and researcher who has spent the past two decades studying how work can improve human health and wellbeing. During his 13 years at Gallup, Tom was the programme leader for the development of Clifton StrengthsFinder, which has helped over 20 million people to uncover their talents, and went on to lead the organization's employee engagement, wellbeing, and leadership practices worldwide. For the past 5 years Tom has served as a Gallup senior scientists, and is also an advisor, investor, and partner in several startups. His ten books, including StrengthsFinder 2.0, Wellbeing, and Eat Move Sleep have sold more than 10 million copies. His newest book, Life's Great Question: Discover How You Contribute to the World, has just been released.

On today's episode, we're discussing how to ensure our work isn’t doing more harm than good when it comes to our wellbeing, and the simple steps we can take to align our contributions to the things that are meaningful and energizing for people.

Connect with Tom Rath: 

You’ll Learn:

  • [03:33] - Tom shares the research that suggests that work is killing people when it should be making us healthier.
  • [05:55] - Tom explains what we can learn from Tinder when it comes to matching the right people to the right work in an effort to improve our wellbeing.
  • [07:55] - Tom offers some tips for what we can do as individuals to ensure our work is energizing and meaningful.
  • [12:14] - Tom explains the difference between our passions and our contributions at work and how these impact our wellbeing.
  • [14:28] - Tom helps us understand how to align our strengths to our contributions at work
  • [16:18] - Tom shares his new tool for helping people to identify their contributions at work.
  • [19:06] - Tom outlines the three contributions every team needs from its people to be successful.
  • [21:21] - Tom explains how people’s contributions can evolve over time and why personality is not as fixed as researchers have previously thought.
  • [25:18] - Tom cautions us on avoiding overplaying our contributions at work and burning ourselves out.
  • [27:45] - Tom explains how we can amplify our contributions by managing our time more effectively.
  • [29:44] - Tom explains how leaders can recruit people around the contributions people most want to make.
  • [31:56] - Tom completes the Lightning Round.

Your Resources:

Thanks for listening! 

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.

Please leave an honest review of the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.  And don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

You can also listen to all the episodes of Making Positive Psychology Work streamed directly to your smartphone or iPad through stitcher. No need for downloading or syncing.

Until next time, take care!  Thank you Tom!

Jan 30, 2020

Sonja Lyubomirsky is a professor of Psychology at the University of California - Riverside. Her research on the science of happiness has been the recipient of many honors.  She is a best-selling author of the books The How of Happiness: A New Approach to Getting the Life You Want and The Myths of Happiness: What Should Make You Happy, but Doesn’t, What Shouldn’t Make You Happy, but Does.

In this conversation, you will hear Sonja share her thoughts and findings on happiness.  Sonja shares some of her findings that prove that positive activity interactions work.  Sonja also talks about some of the myths of happiness, which is the topic of her latest book.  She talks about the identification process to determine which interactions may work for individuals.  She also talks about happiness in group dynamics, specifically the workplace.  Sonja must present these interventions in various ways, depending on the environment and situation and she explains how she does that.  

Connect with Sonja Lyubomirsky:

Website: http://sonjalyubomirsky.com/

You’ll Learn:

  • [01:57] - Sonja shares what she hopes attendees gain from her presentations on happiness. Sonja says that it is possible to become happier.
  • [03:06] - Happiness is a broad term and Sonja describes how she defines the term.  
  • [04:07] - Sonja’s talks about the short-term and long-term improvements people can make with happiness.  She explains that short-term happiness is easier to achieve than long-term happiness.
  • [05:10] - Sonja describes the benefits of people being happy in the workplace.  She also explains why it’s not a good thing to be “too happy” in the workplace.
  • [06:46] - Sonja lists a few interventions that people can use in the workplace to become happier at work.
  • [08:38]- Sonja shares some of her findings that prove that positive activity interventions work.  She talks about gratitude and the role that factors like culture and dosage play a role.
  • [10:37] - In her book, The How of Happiness, Sonja provides a survey to help determine which interventions might work for individuals.  She talks about this identification process.
  • [13:04] - Sonja shares some of the myths of happiness.
  • [15:32] - Sonja talks about the idea of happiness and well-being in social environments and with each other in various relationships.
  • [16:50] - Happiness shouldn’t be forced on anyone. Sonja talks about situations where happiness interventions aren’t the right strategy.
  • [19:11] - Sonja explains how she presents these interventions in different types of workplaces.
  • [20:00] - The Lightning Round with Sonja Lyubomirsky

Your Resources:

Thanks for listening!

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.  

Also, please leave an honest review for the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.

And finally, don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

Special thanks to Sonja for joining me this week. Until next time, take care!

Jan 23, 2020

Russ Harris is the author of the international best-selling self help book, The Happiness Trap.  He is a therapist and coach, as well as a world renowned trainer of acceptance and commitment therapy, otherwise known as ACT.  He has provided ACT training to over 20,000 people all around the world.

In this conversation, you will hear Russ talk about the ACT approach. He explains how individuals and organizations can use the ACT approach to work through negativity and be comfortable with accepting rather than solving.

Connect with Russ Harris:

Website: ActMindfully.com.au

You’ll Learn:

  • [01:28] - Russ talks about finding healthy ways to accept things that seem completely unacceptable.  
  • [04:07] - Russ shares how those of us that are used to a CBT approach to our challenges can get comfortable with accepting rather than solving.  
  • [07:55] - Self-compassion is an important skill to normalize being able to get comfortably uncomfortable.  Russ explains how the ACT approach works through negativity.  
  • [09:54] - Russ talks about the ideas of expansion, anchoring, pursuing the value of kindness, and connectedness with others.
  • [12:22] - Russ describes how to introduce these ideas into workplaces.  He describes his experiences with different types of work environments.
  • [17:24] - When asked about work situations where ACT approach may not be a good fit, Russ shares the range of situations where these strategies have been implemented.
  • [19:50] - The Lightning Round with Russ Harris

Your Resources:

The Happiness Trap: How to Stop Struggling and Start Living: A Guide to ACT - Russ Harris and Steven Hayes

Creativity, Inc.: Overcoming the Unseen Forces That Stand in the Way of True Inspiration - Ed Catmull and Amy Wallace

Thanks for listening!

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.  

Also, please leave an honest review for the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.

And finally, don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

Special thanks to Russ for joining me this week. Until next time, take care!

Jan 17, 2020

Robert Biswas-Diener, is a leading researcher on culture, wellbeing, positive psychology coaching and author of several wonderful books including the The Upside of Your Dark Side

With recent political changes in the United States and the UK leaving many feeling fearful and apprehensive about the future, Robert shares his insights on how to become comfortable with these uncomfortable feelings.  He suggests rather than trying to whitewash them, by accepting them, and seeing them as signals that something isn’t right, you can then decide on a constructive response to what’s unfolding.  You can also apply this in workplaces when looming mergers or restructures stir up similar feelings of uncertainty and fear.

Connect with Robert Biswas-Diener

Robert’s Website - RobertDiener.com
PositiveAcorn.com
IntentionalHappiness.com

You’ll Learn:

  • [01:37] - Robert talks about how emotions are like signals giving us a mental thumbs-up or thumbs-down about the quality of our life.  
  • [05:35] - If you are fearful, it’s telling you that something you care about may be under threat, and you may need to protect it.   
  • [07:54] - Robert explains when you can be comfortably uncomfortable with your negative emotions, instead of feeling overwhelmed, you can act constructively.
  • [11:05] - Robert explains one important step in tolerating these emotions, is to specifically label the emotion to help understand what message it may be telling you.
  • [13:54] – When people are experiencing incredible change in workplaces and feeling very negative, Robert talks about how leaders can build capacity in their employees.
  • [16:20] - Robert says sometimes leaders need to challenge apprehension and other times it’s ok to validate concerns.
  • [17:49] - Robert believes happiness and wellbeing doesn’t have to be a mandate at work.  
  • [20:30] –To be a whole person you need to experience and draw on the full range of positive and negative emotions.
  • [21:35] - Robert explains why “you never want cheerful optimists in the control tower, directing flight traffic.”
  • [22:18] - The Lightning Round with Robert Biswas-Diener

Your Resources:

The Upside of Your Dark Side: Why Being Your Whole Self--Not Just Your “Good” Self--Drives Success and Fulfillment - Robert Biswas-Diener & Todd Kashdan
View all of Robert Biswas-Diener’s books on Amazon
Give and Take: Why Helping Others Drives Our Success - Adam Grant
Love at Goon Park: Harry Harlow and the Science of Affection - Deborah Blum

Thanks for listening!

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.  

Also, please leave an honest review for the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.

And finally, don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

Special thanks to Robert for joining me this week. Until next time, take care!

Dec 20, 2019

George Bonanno is professor of clinical psychology, Director of the Lost Trauma and Emotion Lab, and Director of The Resilience Center for Veterans and Families at Columbia University’s Teacher’s College. George’s research focuses on resilience in the fact of loss and traumatic events.  

Most of us have the natural tools to deal with extreme adversities in our lives. We cope well when extreme things happen to us.  To deal with the world around us, it takes a repertoire of behaviors.  Sometimes, this involves what George calls “coping ugly.”  Sometimes we might need to do something that doesn’t seem pretty but is reasonably effective.  

Connect with George Bonanno:

Website for Lost Trauma and Emotion Lab

You’ll Learn:

  • [01:55] - George will be presenting on loss, trauma, and resilience at the 5th World Congress on Positive Psychology.  He shares what he would like attendees to take home from his presentation. 
  • [03:45] - Media coverage ensures that we are aware of negative events.  The negative psychological consequences can be overcome, and eventually they go away.
  • [05:38] - George believes that resilience is natural and speaks to the fact that organizations are spending money on trying to enhance resilience.
  • [08:50] - George talks about the behaviors that make us cope better.   
  • [11:43] - “Coping ugly” is a phrase that George coined and he talks about what this means.  
  • [12:55] - George talks about how laughter can be an example of coping ugly.  
  • [14:20] - We all know the famous five stages of grief.  George states that these stages have been harmful to many people.  
  • [16:25] - The Lightning Round with George Bonanno

Your Resources:

Thanks for listening!

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.  

Also, please leave an honest review for the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.

And finally, don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

Special thanks to George for joining me this week. Until next time, take care!

Dec 13, 2019

Kim Cameron is one of the top 10 scholars in organizational sciences. Kim recently spoke at the Canadian Conference on Positive Psychology and he talks with us about positive and relational energy.

Positive energy and relational energy has a tremendous positive impact on individuals and organizations. So today, I talk with Kim Cameron, a leading scholar on these topics and positive psychology.

In this interview, you will hear how the positive impact of positive energy and relational energy are measurable down to the cellular level. Kim also shares that contribution is more powerful than achievement and he provides examples from the University of Michigan. Some employees may perceive positive practices as manipulation and Kim shares why he believes this opposition will not become more common.

This interview was produced in partnership with the Canadian Positive Psychology Association and the 3rd Canadian Conference on Positive Psychology.

Tune in to hear more!

Kim Cameron’s Website: http://webuser.bus.umich.edu/cameronk/?_ga=1.99712030.1617036109.1465915693

You’ll Learn

  • [2:20] - People with positive energy and relational energy are four times more likely to succeed.
  • [5:53] - The characteristics of positively energizing leaders.
  • [7:45] - The heliotropic effect and how to unleash it.
  • [9:22] - Contribution goals trump achievement goals
  • [12:58] - Kim talks about the culture of abundance and its positive impact on organizations.
  • [14:34] - The notion of happiness and well-being can be used as a manipulation.
  • [16:18] - Positive practices show results at the cellular level.
  • [18:31] - The lightning round with Kim Cameron

Your Resources:

 

Thanks for listening!

Thanks so much for joining me again this week. If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of the post.

Also, please leave an honest review for Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.

And finally, don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

Special thanks to Caroline for joining me this week. Until next time, take care!

Dec 5, 2019

My guest today is David Cooperrider, renowned for his research in appreciative inquiry, a strength-based approach to creating change.

In this interview, you will hear how appreciative inquiry is being used to build a better world. David explains how organizations can align strengths in ways that make the system’s weaknesses irrelevant. He also shares how individuals and organizations can use this life-centric approach to go through the steps of his new P.O.S.I.T.I.V.E change model.

This interview was produced in partnership with the Canadian Positive Psychology Association and the 3rd Canadian Conference on Positive Psychology.

Tune in to hear more!

Connect with Wayne Baker: 

Website: www.davidcooperrider.com

Twitter: @Dlc6David

You’ll Learn

  • [2:25] - David explains the basics of appreciative inquiry
  • [4:52] - What you and your organization can gain from this positive change approach
  • [5:27] - Rethinking our approach to change.
  • [7:05] - Step P - Positive re-framing
  • [9:30] - Step O - Omni search and bringing in all of the strengths at every level
  • [10:50] - Step S - Strengthen the strengths
  • [12:28] - Step I - Imagining our future
  • [14:40] - Steps T & I - Translate and improvise
  • [16:30] - Step V - Valuing progress moments
  • [18:02] - Step E - Embedding the change and reversing our mindset on change
  • [20:50] - The lightning round with David Cooperrider

Your Resources:

Thanks for listening! 

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.

Please leave an honest review of the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.  And don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

You can also listen to all the episodes of Making Positive Psychology Work streamed directly to your smartphone or iPad through stitcher. No need for downloading or syncing.

Until next time, take care!  Thank you David!

Nov 28, 2019

Dr. Wayne Baker is a professor of business administration and professor of management and organizations at the University of Michigan's Ross School of Business, and faculty director of the Centre for Positive Organizations. The author of the forthcoming book, 'All You Have to Do Is Ask', as well as five other books and many scholarly articles. Wayne's research focuses on social capital, social networks, generosity, and positive organizations. He's also the co-founder and board member of Give and Take, Inc. who are developers of collaboration technologies based on the principles in All You Have to Do Is Ask.

In this week’s podcast, we learn why being able to ask to help is one of the keys to workplace success, and the simple steps you can take to ask in ways that make it easy for people to say yes!

Connect with Wayne Baker: 

You’ll Learn:

  • [03:15] - Wayne explains why being a good giver-requester at work shapes our success and wellbeing in workplaces.
  • [04:29] - Wayne outlines how his research on giver-requesters intersects with the research of Professor Adam Grant on being successful self-protective givers.
  • [06:07] - Wayne shares what the research is finding on how gender influences our ability to ask for help at work.
  • [06:57] - Wayne offers insights on how age and power influence our ability to ask for help at work.
  • [08:39] - Wayne outlines how psychological safety in our workplaces influences our ability to ask for help at work and what we can do to improve this
  • [10:34] - Wayne outlines the SMART criteria to make it easier to ask for help at work and for people to say yes.
  • [13:12] - Wayne shares his free assessment tool to measure your ability to ask for help and shares the findings surfacing from this new research.
  • [14:54] - Wayne shares the barriers that make it difficult for most people to ask for help at work and how we can overcome these.
  • [18:01] - Wayne shares why researchers are finding that you should ask people more than once for help.
  • [19:06] - Wayne provides some plug and play routines that workplaces can use to help make asking for help easier.
  • [20:34] - Wayne shares how we can map the energy for asking and giving within our teams to measure what is unfolding.
  • [21:23] - Wayne explains how mini-games can be used to playfully incentivize a group to ask for help to solve a problem together.
  • [23:22] - Wayne offers some tips to help recruit and rewards leaders who are chief help seekers.
  • [24:50] - Wayne offers two cautions about asking for help at work.
  • [26:28] - Wayne completes the Lightning Round.

Your Resources:

Thanks for listening! 

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.

Please leave an honest review of the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.  And don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

You can also listen to all the episodes of Making Positive Psychology Work streamed directly to your smartphone or iPad through stitcher. No need for downloading or syncing.

Until next time, take care!  Thank you Wayne!

Nov 21, 2019

Stephen Carter is the founder of one of Australia's fastest-growing, privately-owned recruitment firms, Sharp and Carter, who have five offices and more than 120 staff around the country.

In this week’s podcast, we explore how putting people first by using positive leadership approaches has helped one workplace grow their revenue by 55% per annum for the last five years.

Connect with Stephen Carter: 

You’ll Learn:

  • [02:13] - Carts explains how putting people first has helped his organization grow 55% per annum for the past five years.
  • [04:35] - Carts shares why their leadership team felt confident to put people before profit.
  • [07:03] - Carts outlines how the shift to putting people first was explained to employees and what they did to overcome people’s cynicism about this approach.
  • [09:30] - Carts share the cultural pillars that emerged as a result of putting people first and how these are used to guide people’s day to day behaviors in the business.
  • [13:24] - Carts outlines how positive leadership practices have been scaled and embedded across their organization – even when trust gets broken.
  • [18:15] - Carts explains how they try to support people who are really struggling when it comes to their wellbeing at work.
  • [21:07] - Carts offers some tips for how leaders can look after their own wellbeing as they try to put people first in their organization.
  • [24:31] - Carts completes the Lightning Round.

Your Resources:

Thanks for listening! 

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.

Please leave an honest review of the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.  And don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

You can also listen to all the episodes of Making Positive Psychology Work streamed directly to your smartphone or iPad through stitcher. No need for downloading or syncing.

Until next time, take care!  Thank you Stephen!

Nov 14, 2019

Dr. BJ Fogg teaches good people how behavior works, so they can create products and services that benefit everyday people around the world. A behavioral scientist with deep experience in innovation and teaching, BJ runs a research lab at Stanford University, and trains innovators to use his work, so they can create solutions that influence behavior in health, financial well-being, learning, productivity, and more. He's personally coached over 40,000 people informing new habits using his breakthrough method called Tiny Habits. And, his forthcoming book Tiny Habits: The Small Changes That Change Everything is scheduled for publication in early 2020.

In this week's episode, we learn the simple recipe for creating tiny habits and how to deal with our motivation monkeys and surface the golden behaviors that improve our wellbeing.

Connect with BJ Fogg: 

You’ll Learn:

  • [02:39] - BJ explains why most of us find changing our behaviors challenging because we approach change in the wrong way.
  • [04:16] - BJ outlines the three variables his research has found that can make changing our behavior easier.
  • [08:17] - BJ explains why our motivations for changing our behavior is often unreliable and how we can tame our motivation monkeys.
  • [09:49] - BJ shares some tips on managing motivation conflicts and motivation waves when it comes to changing our behaviors.
  • [13:12] - BJ shares his tips for how we can surface golden behaviors to create more of the changes we’re wanting.
  • [15:43] - BJ helps us understand the important difference between our aspirations, our goals, and our behaviors when it comes to surfacing our golden behaviors.
  • [17:32] - BJ shares the recipe for turning golden behaviors into tiny habits.
  • [20:22] - BJ explains why we need to celebrate the completion of our habits and the role mood plays in helping us to create behavior changes.
  • [25:46] - BJ outlines how an ability chain model can help us troubleshoot our tiny habits when the changes we want to create become stuck.
  • [27:41] - BJ completes the Lightning Round.

Your Resources:

Thanks for listening! 

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.

Please leave an honest review of the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.  And don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

You can also listen to all the episodes of Making Positive Psychology Work streamed directly to your smartphone or iPad through stitcher. No need for downloading or syncing.

Until next time, take care!  Thank you BJ!

Nov 7, 2019

Dr. Timothy R. Clark is the founder and managing partner at LeadFactor and a highly sought after advisor, coach, and facilitator to CEOs and senior leadership teams around the world. He's the author of four books with his newest, The Four Stages of Psychological Safety due out in early 2020, and he's written more than 150 articles on leadership, change, strategy, human capital, culture, and employee engagement.

In this week’s podcast, we explore the four stages of psychological safety and how we can shape our wellbeing and performance at work.

Connect with Dr. Timothy R. Clark: 

http://leaderfactor.com/

You’ll Learn:

  • [02:19] - Tim explains what psychological safety is and why it recently became a hot topic of conversations in many workplaces when it comes to helping people thrive at work.
  • [03:44] - Tim shares some of the research-based findings on the potential benefits for leaders who invest in psychological safety.
  • [07:16] - Tim explains why improving diversity and inclusion successfully depends on also heightening psychological safety.
  • [09:39] - Tim explains what studies are finding out about the link between psychological safety and people’s levels of wellbeing at work.
  • [11:31] - Tim offers two practical recommendations based on what researchers are finding right now can help to improve psychological safety in workplaces.
  • [15:30] - Tim outlines the four stages of psychological safety that can help organizations understand where they’re people are at practically and how it can be heightened.
  • [21:24] -Tim challenges us to think about when leaders push the fear buttons in workplaces and what impact does this have on psychological safety for ourselves and others.
  • [24:56] - Tim completes the Lightning Round.

Your Resources:

Thanks for listening! 

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.

Please leave an honest review of the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.  And don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

You can also listen to all the episodes of Making Positive Psychology Work streamed directly to your smartphone or iPad through stitcher. No need for downloading or syncing.

Until next time, take care!  Thank you Tim!

Oct 31, 2019

Tom Rath is an author and researcher who has spent the past two decades studying how work can improve human health and wellbeing. His ten books including, "Strengths Finder 2.0", "Wellbeing", and "Eat Move Sleep", have sold more than ten million copies, and made hundreds of appearances on global bestseller lists. During his 13 years at Gallup, Tom was the Program Leader for the development of Clifton Strengths Finder, which has helped over 20 million people to uncover their talents, and went on to lead the organization’s employee engagement, wellbeing, and leadership practices worldwide. He has served for the past five years as a Gallup Senior Scientist. And he's also an advisor, investor, and partner in several start-ups.

In this podcast, we explore how small changes in the way you eat, move and sleep can improve your wellbeing and performance at work.

Connect with Tom Rath: 

You’ll Learn:

  • [04:29] - Tom explains how the small choices around how we eat, move and sleep each day can have a big impact on our wellbeing and performance at work.
  • [08:16] - Tom outlines why tackling the way we eat, move, and sleep simultaneously is a better way to improve our energy levels.
  • [11:38] - Tom offers some small choices that can improve the way we’re eating each day.
  • [15:44] - Tom provides some tips to help leaders improve the way people eat at work together.
  • [18:18] - Tom explains why sitting is our biggest health challenge at work and the easy ways we can get people moving more at work.
  • [21:35] - Tom explains why lack of sleep is the most underestimated threat to our wellbeing and performance at work.
  • [25:17] - Tom completes the Lightning Round.

Your Resources:

Thanks for listening! 

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.

Please leave an honest review of the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.  And don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

You can also listen to all the episodes of Making Positive Psychology Work streamed directly to your smartphone or iPad through stitcher. No need for downloading or syncing.

Until next time, take care!  Thank you Tom!

Oct 24, 2019

Jane Dutton is a Professor Emerita of Business Administration and Psychology at the University of Michigan. Jane's research focuses on how organizational conditions enable human thriving, and in particular, how the quality of connection between people at work affects individual and organizational flourishing. Her research explores compassion in organizations, resilience in organizations, as well as energy in organizations, and she's published over 100 articles and book chapters, edited 12 books, and written a book for managers called Energise Your Workplace: How To Build And Sustain High-Quality Connections At Work. In 2012, Jane was awarded the Scholarly Contributions in Management Award for the Academy of Management, which is a lifetime achievement award.

In this week’s podcast, we explore the value of creating high-quality connections with people at work and the simple steps you can take to authentically connect with anyone – even your most challenging colleagues.

Connect with Jane Dutton: 

You’ll Learn:

  • [02:23] - Jane defines what creates a high-quality connection for us at work.
  • [04:43] - Jane explains the difference between high-quality connections and Professor Barbara Fredrickson’s micro-moments of connections.
  • [06:37] - Jane outlines the benefits of prioritizing high-quality connections when it comes to our wellbeing and performance at work.
  • [10:11] - Jane shares what her latest research is finding out about the ability of high-quality connections to improve psychological safety in teams.
  • [11:58] - Jane offers some tips on how high-quality connections can help ease the rising rates of loneliness in workplaces.
  • [14:33] - Jane explains how leaders can create cultures that prioritize high-quality connections among their workers.
  • [17:33] - Jane offers some simple suggestions for convincing leaders of the need to prioritize high-quality connections in our workplaces.
  • [21:32] - Jane offers some practical suggestions for us to create more high-quality connections in our relationships at work.
  • [25:11] - Jane shares what her research is finding can help us manage our corrosive connections and more challenging relationships at work.
  • [30:04] - Jane completes the Lightning Round.

Your Resources:

Thanks for listening! 

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.

Please leave an honest review of the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.  And don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

You can also listen to all the episodes of Making Positive Psychology Work streamed directly to your smartphone or iPad through stitcher. No need for downloading or syncing.

Until next time, take care!  Thank you Jane!

Oct 17, 2019

Dr. Steven Rogelberg is an organizational psychologist who holds the title of Chancellor's Professor at UNC Charlotte for distinguished national, international and interdisciplinary contributions. He's an award-winning teacher and recipient of the very prestigious Humboldt Award for his research with over 100 publications, addressing issues such as team effectiveness, leadership, engagement, health and employee wellbeing, meetings at work and organizational research methods. His latest book, The Surprising Science of Meetings: How You Can Lead Your Team to Peak Performance, was recognized by the Washington Post as the number one leadership book to watch for in 2019 and has been featured in media outlets around the world

In this week’s podcast, we explore the simple steps you can take to run more positive and productive meetings at work.

Connect with Steven Rogelberg: 

You’ll Learn:

  • [02:27] - Steven explains how workplace meetings offer opportunities to improve our individual and collective wellbeing.
  • [03:22] - Steven outlines what his research is finding out about the best meetings in workplaces.
  • [05:13] - Steven outlines why so many workplaces meetings struggle to bring out the best in people.
  • [06:44] - Steven explains how we can design meetings in ways that allow us and others to be more effective givers at work.
  • [08:57] - Steven outlines why planning your meetings to create a little stress can be beneficial for all participants.
  • [10:22] - Steven shares what his research has found about the ideal length of our meetings.
  • [11:31] - Steven offers some practical tips on how many people to invite to a meeting.
  • [14:14] - Steven explains why meetings leaders need to be mindful of the mood of their meetings and how can they shape this practically.
  • [17:44] - Steven explains how silence can be used to improve our meetings.
  • [19:21] - Steven offers some tips for team members to improve meetings.
  • [20:42] - Steven explains how we can make virtual meetings more productive and supportive of our wellbeing.
  • [23:36] - Steven completes the Lightning Round.

Your Resources:

Thanks for listening! 

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.

Please leave an honest review of the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.  And don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

You can also listen to all the episodes of Making Positive Psychology Work streamed directly to your smartphone or iPad through stitcher. No need for downloading or syncing.

Until next time, take care!  Thank you Steven!

Oct 10, 2019

Alissa Daire Nelson is a certified strength strategy coach who gives people the tools and guidance to put their strengths to work. She's the host of the Maximize Your Strengths podcast, and author of From Frustrated To Frickin' Awesome: 4 Steps to Achieve the Success You're Wired For. Alissa's work has been featured in media outlets all over the world.

In this week’s episode, we explore the practical steps we can take to spot and develop people’s strengths – the things we’re good at and enjoy doing – using tools like Clifton Strengths in workplaces.

Connect with Alissa Nelson: 

You’ll Learn:

  • [02:13] - Alissa explains why people’s strengths can help us quickly strengthen our relationship at work.
  • [04:49] - Alissa explains how tools like Clifton Strengths can give us a language to spot and understand the strengths in each other.
  • [08:04] - Alissa explains how we can use the talents that tools like Clifton Strengths surface for us as we go about our jobs to improve our performance and wellbeing at work.
  • [11:06] - Alissa explains why it's helpful to understand the contributions our strengths can make and the needs we each have to support our strengths at work.
  • [14:11] - Alissa explains how we can become aware and manage the triggers that occur when our strengths are overlooked or undervalued by others we work with.
  • [19:37] - Alissa offers some tips to help us get better at noticing how we can develop our strengths more effectively at work.
  • [22:36] - Alissa offers tips for leaders to help develop their people’s strengths more at work.
  • [26:37] - Alissa completes the Lightning Round.

Your Resources:

Thanks for listening! 

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.

Please leave an honest review of the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.  And don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

You can also listen to all the episodes of Making Positive Psychology Work streamed directly to your smartphone or iPad through stitcher. No need for downloading or syncing.

Until next time, take care!  Thank you Alissa!

Oct 4, 2019

Wendy Wood is a professor at the University of Southern California and visiting faculty at Insead Business school in France. Wendy has spent the last 30 years studying people's habits and understanding how to change them, and her research has been featured in media publications all over the world and is the focus of her forthcoming book Good Habits, Bad Habits.

In this week’s episode, we explore what the latest research is finding out about how we can create and sustain good habits to support our wellbeing.

Connect with Wendy Wood: 

You’ll Learn:

  • [02:38] - Wendy explains why creating good habits can be challenging for many of us.
  • [04:27] - Wendy shares what her research is finding about how we can develop good habits.
  • [06:22] - Wendy shares why her research has found that it doesn’t take 21 days to build a habit.
  • [08:40] - Wendy explains why thinking about the context for the habits we want to create is so important and offers some tips to make it easier to activate the habits we want to build.
  • [11:24] - Wendy explains the power of repetition when it comes to building the habits we most want.
  • [13:09] - Wendy outlines the role rewards play in creating our habits and what kind of rewards work best.
  • [16:13] - Wendy offers some tips for aligning our goals and our habits to make them easier to sustain.
  • [17:28] - Wendy explains the surprising finding in her research on the impact our habits have on our levels of self-control.
  • [19:47] - Wendy helps us understand how stacking or swapping habits can make it easier to create changes in our behavior.
  • [22:26] - Wendy offers some cautions and caveats for building good habits in ways that are good for you and others.
  • [24:29] - Wendy offers tips for breaking bad habits like constantly checking our mobile phones.
  • [27:20] - Wendy shares why she believes friction is important for our habits.
  • [28:24] - Wendy completes the Lightning Round.

Your Resources:

Thanks for listening! 

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.

Please leave an honest review of the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.  And don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

You can also listen to all the episodes of Making Positive Psychology Work streamed directly to your smartphone or iPad through stitcher. No need for downloading or syncing.

Until next time, take care!  Thank you Wendy!

Sep 27, 2019

Cy Wakeman is a drama researcher, global thought leader, and New York Times bestselling author, recognized for cultivating a counter-intuitive, reality-based approach to leadership. Cy has helped companies such as Google, Facebook, NASA, and many others to navigate our rapidly changing world, using good mental processes to harness energy wasted in workplace drama, and reinvest that effort into achieving profound business results. Her work has been featured in several media outlets around the world. The author of several books, her latest is No Ego: How to Cut the Cost of Drama and Entitlement, and Drive Big Results.

In this week’s episode, we explore at why most of us waste 2.5 hours a day on average in emotional workplaces dramas and the simple steps we can take to ditch the drama, improve our wellbeing and save ourselves time, energy, and money.

Connect with Cy Wakeman: 

You’ll Learn:

  • [02:36] - Cy explains why workplaces lose billions of dollars every year due to the emotional waste of employees.
  • [03:29] - Cy outlines what her research has found drives drama in workplaces.
  • [05:23] - Cy shares why most of us lose 2.5 hours a day in unnecessary dramas at work.
  • [08:07] - Cy provides some questions leaders can use to help their people ditch the drama.
  • [14:23] - Cy shares why leaders can find it hard to ditch the drama in workplaces.
  • [15:54] - Cy outlines why a lack of accountability drives drama in many workplaces and how this can be addressed.
  • [20:24] - Cy shares why fostering engagement without accountability often leads to entitlement in workplaces.
  • [24:29] - Cy shares her insights on why change management should die as an organizational practice in order to minimize drama in workplaces.
  • [27:27] - Cy explores how managing our emotional waste better can improve psychological safety in workplaces.
  • [29:52] - Cy explains why it’s not enough for employees to just manage their own emotional waste, but why leaders and organizations need to support these behaviours.
  • [31:26] - Cy completes the Lightning Round.

Your Resources:

Thanks for listening! 

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.

Please leave an honest review of the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.  And don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

You can also listen to all the episodes of Making Positive Psychology Work streamed directly to your smartphone or iPad through stitcher. No need for downloading or syncing.

Until next time, take care!  Thank you Cy!

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