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Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast

If you believe as I do that by uncovering tested, practical ways to help people move from functioning to flourishing at work, we can better navigate the incredible challenges and opportunities our world faces, then this podcast is for you. My goal each week is to give you access to the world’ leading positive psychology, positive organizational scholarship and neuroscience researchers and practitioners to explore their latest research findings on how you can improve wellbeing, develop strengths, nurture positive relationships, make work meaningful and cultivate the grit to accomplish what matters most. If you want evidence-based approaches to bringing out the best in yourself and others at work, then consider this podcast your step-by-step guide.
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Now displaying: January, 2021
Jan 28, 2021

Dr. Michael Maddaus is a retired professor of thoracic surgery at the University of Minnesota, who has trained with Kristin Neff and Chris Germer to teach self-compassion. Michael currently works with individuals and with surgical groups to help them enhance their resilience and ability to thrive.

In this week’s podcast, we discover how investing in small daily wellbeing behaviors can help workers to build a resilience bank account that helps them to avoid burnout.

Connect with Dr. Michael Maddaus:

You’ll Learn:

  • [ 03:23] - Michael defines the three domains of burnout.
  • [05:49] - Michael explains what radical acceptance of emotional exhaustion might look like practically in our jobs.
  • [07:00] - Michael shares what radical acceptance of cynicism might look like practically in our jobs.
  • [08:45] - Michael explains what radical acceptance of depersonalization might look like practically in our jobs.
  • [10:05] - Michael shares some tips for how workplaces can support people experiencing burnout.
  • [12:33] - Michael explains how a resilience bank account can help protect us from burnout at work.
  • [14:58] - Michael offers some practical approaches to keep our resilience bank accounts topped up.
  • [20:14] - Michael shares some practical examples of how teams can support each other’s resilience bank accounts.
  • [26:19] - Michael enters the lightning round.

Thanks for listening!

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.

Please leave an honest review for the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.  And don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

You can also listen to all the episodes of Making Positive Psychology Work streamed directly to your smartphone or iPad through stitcher. No need for downloading or syncing.

Until next time, take care!  Thank you, Michael!

Jan 21, 2021

Peter Senge, who has been at the forefront of organizational learning since publishing his classic text, The Fifth Discipline, in 1990, provided theories and methods to foster aspiration, develop reflective conversation, and understand complexity in service of shaping learning orientated organization cultures. Throughout Peter’s work with leading organizations around the world, he’s been asking, “How do we create the conditions for people to work together at their best, cultivating the innate system’s intelligence that is our birthright, but is all but lost in modern culture.” As an engineer by training, Peter’s work has always emphasized tools and methods, not for their own sake, but as vehicles for building individual and collective capacities. And these approaches have been captured in the many books he’s published.

In this week’s podcast, we explore how to embrace the uncertainty and complexity of navigating change and unlocking learning in our workplaces.

Connect with Peter Senge:

You’ll Learn:

  • [02:57] - Peter explores if we need new measures of success when it comes to determining if workplace change efforts have succeeded or failed.
  • [06:22] - Peter explains why the complexity of change in workplaces is often misunderstood.
  • [11:32] - Peter offers tips for how we can create more cultures of learning to help us navigate workplace uncertainty and change in 2021.
  • [16:12] - Peter explains how we can better navigate the creative and emotional tension that exists between our hopes for the future and our current reality.
  • [21:50] - Peter shares why workplaces need healthy leadership communities, rather than leaders as heroes, to support change.
  • [24:17] - Peter explains why the desire for continual growth creates changes challenges in workplaces.
  • [28:49] - Peter offers guidance for our workplaces can leverage complexity to help them create more successful changes.
  • [32:30] - Peter enters the lightning round.

Thanks for listening!

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.

Please leave an honest review for the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.  And don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

You can also listen to all the episodes of Making Positive Psychology Work streamed directly to your smartphone or iPad through stitcher. No need for downloading or syncing.

Until next time, take care!  Thank you, Peter!

Jan 14, 2021

Today we’re talking to Vikki Reynolds, who’s an activist and therapist who works to bridge the worlds of social justice with community work and therapy. An adjunct professor, she’s written and presented internationally on her work, responding to the opioid catastrophe, refugees and survivors of torture, and supporting violence, mental health, substance abuse, housing, and shelter counselors in gender and sexually diverse communities.

In this week’s episode, we explore how to find our zone of fabulousness and the power of collective accountability in the face of work experiences that can lead to “burnout”.

Connect with Vikki Reynolds

You’ll Learn:

  • [01:47] - Vikki explains why our approaches to vicarious trauma and burnout in workplaces need re-thinking.
  • [03:33] - Vikki shares how we can each find our Zone of Fabulousness when it comes to helping others at work.
  • [04:45] - Vikki explains why the goal of ‘safe enough’ rather than psychological safety may serve us better when it comes to sustaining connection with each other.
  • [08:26] - Vikki offers some tips to help us resist the politics of politeness and instead embrace the potential value of discord.
  • [10:45] - Vikki explains the power of collective accountability to enact our ethics.
  • [23:40] - Vikki enters the lightning round.

Thanks for listening!

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.

Please leave an honest review for the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.  And don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

You can also listen to all the episodes of Making Positive Psychology Work streamed directly to your smartphone or iPad through stitcher. No need for downloading or syncing.

Until next time, take care!  Thank you, Vikki!

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