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Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast

If you believe as I do that by uncovering tested, practical ways to help people move from functioning to flourishing at work, we can better navigate the incredible challenges and opportunities our world faces, then this podcast is for you. My goal each week is to give you access to the world’ leading positive psychology, positive organizational scholarship and neuroscience researchers and practitioners to explore their latest research findings on how you can improve wellbeing, develop strengths, nurture positive relationships, make work meaningful and cultivate the grit to accomplish what matters most. If you want evidence-based approaches to bringing out the best in yourself and others at work, then consider this podcast your step-by-step guide.
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Now displaying: 2021
Feb 25, 2021

Stefanie Johnson is an associate professor of management at the University of Colorado, whose research focuses on the intersection of leadership and diversity. Stef works with companies to implement evidence-based practices to reduce unconscious bias and increase inclusion. She is a member of the MG 100 Coaches, was selected for the 2020 Thinkers50 Radar List, and is the author of the National Bestseller, Inclusify, harnessing the power of uniqueness and belonging to build innovative teams.

In this week’s episode, we explore how supporting people to stand out whilst creating a sense of belonging can help us to thrive at work.

Connect with Stefanie K Johnson:

You’ll Learn:

  • [ 02:33] - Stef shares how we can more confidently engage in the diversity and inclusion conversation with each other, even when it’s awkward.
  • [05:41] - Stef explains why we each long to stand out and fit in and the challenges and opportunities this creates for inclusion.
  • [07:37] - Steph shares how leaders can help to create more diverse and inclusive teams where different ideas and approaches are respected and valued.
  • [12:03] - Stef shares how organizations can reduce gender bias & support women in the workplace
  • [15:24] - Stef shares what her research shows helps to minimize unconscious bias
  • [29:04] - Stef Shares what listeners can try practically to bring this to life in their own workplaces
  • [32:31] - Stef explains the cautions & caveats we may need to be mindful of, as we do this work.
  • [35:06] - Stef completes the lightning round!

Thanks for listening!

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.

Please leave an honest review for the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.  And don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

You can also listen to all the episodes of Making Positive Psychology Work streamed directly to your smartphone or iPad through stitcher. No need for downloading or syncing.

Until next time, take care!  Thank you, Stef!

Feb 18, 2021

Dr. Barbara Fredrickson is the Kenan Distinguished Professor of Psychology and Neuroscience and Director of the Positive Emotions and Psychophysiology Lab at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. She’s among the most highly cited and influential scholars in psychology and has published more than 100 peer-reviewed articles and book chapters and her general audience books, Positivity and Love 2.0 have been translated into more than a dozen languages. Dr. Fredrickson’s scholarly contributions have been recognized with numerous honors and her work has influenced scholars and practitioners worldwide within education, business, healthcare, the military, and beyond, and she’s regularly invited to give keynotes nationally and internationally.

In this week’s podcast, we explore how positive emotions can help to broaden our minds and build our emotional, social and physical well-being.

Connect with Dr. Barbara Fredrickson:

You’ll Learn:

  • [ 02:58] - Barb explains why her research suggests we need to intentionally prioritize positivity in order to care for our wellbeing.
  • [04:36] - Barb shares why positivity needs to be heartfelt.
  • [08:17] - Barb explains why it’s important to be mindful about when to reach for positivity and when to sit with our more uncomfortable emotions.
  • [10:51] - Barb shares her latest thoughts on positivity ratios and what we should be aiming for when it comes to the amount of positive emotion we experience.
  • [13:27] - Barb outlines what studies are discovering about the impact positive emotions have on caring for our physical health.
  • [14:38] - Michelle enters the lightning round!

Thanks for listening!

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.

Please leave an honest review for the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.  And don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

You can also listen to all the episodes of Making Positive Psychology Work streamed directly to your smartphone or iPad through stitcher. No need for downloading or syncing.

Until next time, take care!  Thank you, Barb!

Feb 11, 2021

Dr. Belle Rose Ragins is a Sheldon B. Lubar professor of management at the University of Wisconsin Milwaukee. She’s an expert in the field of mentoring, diversity, and positive relationships at work. Dr. Ragins has co-authored and edited a number of books. She’s an elected fellow of five professional associations, a Fulbright Senior Specialist Scholar, and past editor of The Academy of Management Review. She’s also received numerous Lifetime Achievement Awards. Her research has over 20,000 citations, and she was recently recognized in Stanford University’s Top Two Percent of Scientists in the World.

In this week’s podcast, we explore high-quality mentoring relationships and the positive impact they can have on diversity and inclusion initiatives.

Connect with Dr. Belle Rose Ragins:

You’ll Learn:

  • [ 02:55] - Belle describes high-quality mentoring relationships and shares why they’re important.
  • [04:09] - Belle paints a picture of who is mentoring in workplaces and what we want this to look like.
  • [07:18] - Belle discusses by mentoring is particularly important for marginalized and disadvantaged groups in workplaces.
  • [13:29] - Belle shares how mentoring can support diversity and inclusion initiatives for the whole of workplace change.
  • [16:09] - Belle highlights what steps we can take to go from ordinary mentoring relationships to extraordinary mentoring relationships.
  • [21:45] - Belle shares the immediate next steps we can take to open ourselves up to being mentors.
  • [23:16] - Belle explains what leaders need to know to ensure their mentoring programs are achieving the outcomes they hope for.
  • [26:42] - Belle enters the lightning round.

Thanks for listening!

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.

Please leave an honest review for the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.  And don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

You can also listen to all the episodes of Making Positive Psychology Work streamed directly to your smartphone or iPad through stitcher. No need for downloading or syncing.

Until next time, take care!  Thank you, Belle!

Feb 4, 2021

Dr. Meg Warren is an Assistant Professor of Management at Western Washington University. Meg’s award-winning research uses a positive psychology approach to study how individuals from relatively privileged groups can serve as allies to marginalized outgroups. She’s a co-editor of the International Journal of Wellbeing and the lead editor of two books, Scientific Advances in Positive Psychology and Toward a Positive Psychology of Relationships.

In this week’s episode, we explore what the latest research is finding on how we can be better allies in workplaces and why many workplace diversity and inclusion policies fail to make a positive difference.

Connect with Dr. Meg Warren:

You’ll Learn:

  • [ 03:15] - Meg offers some advice for how we can more readily step into conversations about allyship with each other, even when we’re worried about saying the wrong things.
  • [07:07] - Meg shares how researchers define who is in a relatively privileged group and who is in a marginalized outgroup.
  • [09:57] - Meg shares how researchers define allyship.
  • [11:12] - Meg offers insights from her research on why and how exceptional allies show up for marginalized groups in workplaces.
  • [15:22] - Meg explains why the top-down enactment of diversity policies often have unintended negative consequences in workplaces and how these can be avoided.
  • [17:58] - Meg shares new research on a simple and quick allyship intervention in workplaces that has been found to boost feelings of inclusion and vitality.
  • [22:48] - Meg explores how allyship behaviors and psychological safety may be intertwined.
  • [24:37] - Meg offers some cautions and caveats for helping people to build the skills to be more effective allies.
  • [25:32] - Meg enters the lightning round.

Thanks for listening!

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.

Please leave an honest review for the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.  And don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

You can also listen to all the episodes of Making Positive Psychology Work streamed directly to your smartphone or iPad through stitcher. No need for downloading or syncing.

Until next time, take care!  Thank you, Meg!

Jan 28, 2021

Dr. Michael Maddaus is a retired professor of thoracic surgery at the University of Minnesota, who has trained with Kristin Neff and Chris Germer to teach self-compassion. Michael currently works with individuals and with surgical groups to help them enhance their resilience and ability to thrive.

In this week’s podcast, we discover how investing in small daily wellbeing behaviors can help workers to build a resilience bank account that helps them to avoid burnout.

Connect with Dr. Michael Maddaus:

You’ll Learn:

  • [ 03:23] - Michael defines the three domains of burnout.
  • [05:49] - Michael explains what radical acceptance of emotional exhaustion might look like practically in our jobs.
  • [07:00] - Michael shares what radical acceptance of cynicism might look like practically in our jobs.
  • [08:45] - Michael explains what radical acceptance of depersonalization might look like practically in our jobs.
  • [10:05] - Michael shares some tips for how workplaces can support people experiencing burnout.
  • [12:33] - Michael explains how a resilience bank account can help protect us from burnout at work.
  • [14:58] - Michael offers some practical approaches to keep our resilience bank accounts topped up.
  • [20:14] - Michael shares some practical examples of how teams can support each other’s resilience bank accounts.
  • [26:19] - Michael enters the lightning round.

Thanks for listening!

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.

Please leave an honest review for the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.  And don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

You can also listen to all the episodes of Making Positive Psychology Work streamed directly to your smartphone or iPad through stitcher. No need for downloading or syncing.

Until next time, take care!  Thank you, Michael!

Jan 21, 2021

Peter Senge, who has been at the forefront of organizational learning since publishing his classic text, The Fifth Discipline, in 1990, provided theories and methods to foster aspiration, develop reflective conversation, and understand complexity in service of shaping learning orientated organization cultures. Throughout Peter’s work with leading organizations around the world, he’s been asking, “How do we create the conditions for people to work together at their best, cultivating the innate system’s intelligence that is our birthright, but is all but lost in modern culture.” As an engineer by training, Peter’s work has always emphasized tools and methods, not for their own sake, but as vehicles for building individual and collective capacities. And these approaches have been captured in the many books he’s published.

In this week’s podcast, we explore how to embrace the uncertainty and complexity of navigating change and unlocking learning in our workplaces.

Connect with Peter Senge:

You’ll Learn:

  • [02:57] - Peter explores if we need new measures of success when it comes to determining if workplace change efforts have succeeded or failed.
  • [06:22] - Peter explains why the complexity of change in workplaces is often misunderstood.
  • [11:32] - Peter offers tips for how we can create more cultures of learning to help us navigate workplace uncertainty and change in 2021.
  • [16:12] - Peter explains how we can better navigate the creative and emotional tension that exists between our hopes for the future and our current reality.
  • [21:50] - Peter shares why workplaces need healthy leadership communities, rather than leaders as heroes, to support change.
  • [24:17] - Peter explains why the desire for continual growth creates changes challenges in workplaces.
  • [28:49] - Peter offers guidance for our workplaces can leverage complexity to help them create more successful changes.
  • [32:30] - Peter enters the lightning round.

Thanks for listening!

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.

Please leave an honest review for the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.  And don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

You can also listen to all the episodes of Making Positive Psychology Work streamed directly to your smartphone or iPad through stitcher. No need for downloading or syncing.

Until next time, take care!  Thank you, Peter!

Jan 14, 2021

Today we’re talking to Vikki Reynolds, who’s an activist and therapist who works to bridge the worlds of social justice with community work and therapy. An adjunct professor, she’s written and presented internationally on her work, responding to the opioid catastrophe, refugees and survivors of torture, and supporting violence, mental health, substance abuse, housing, and shelter counselors in gender and sexually diverse communities.

In this week’s episode, we explore how to find our zone of fabulousness and the power of collective accountability in the face of work experiences that can lead to “burnout”.

Connect with Vikki Reynolds

You’ll Learn:

  • [01:47] - Vikki explains why our approaches to vicarious trauma and burnout in workplaces need re-thinking.
  • [03:33] - Vikki shares how we can each find our Zone of Fabulousness when it comes to helping others at work.
  • [04:45] - Vikki explains why the goal of ‘safe enough’ rather than psychological safety may serve us better when it comes to sustaining connection with each other.
  • [08:26] - Vikki offers some tips to help us resist the politics of politeness and instead embrace the potential value of discord.
  • [10:45] - Vikki explains the power of collective accountability to enact our ethics.
  • [23:40] - Vikki enters the lightning round.

Thanks for listening!

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.

Please leave an honest review for the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.  And don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

You can also listen to all the episodes of Making Positive Psychology Work streamed directly to your smartphone or iPad through stitcher. No need for downloading or syncing.

Until next time, take care!  Thank you, Vikki!

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