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Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast

If you believe as I do that by uncovering tested, practical ways to help people move from functioning to flourishing at work, we can better navigate the incredible challenges and opportunities our world faces, then this podcast is for you. My goal each week is to give you access to the world’ leading positive psychology, positive organizational scholarship and neuroscience researchers and practitioners to explore their latest research findings on how you can improve wellbeing, develop strengths, nurture positive relationships, make work meaningful and cultivate the grit to accomplish what matters most. If you want evidence-based approaches to bringing out the best in yourself and others at work, then consider this podcast your step-by-step guide.
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Now displaying: January, 2017
Jan 26, 2017

Russ Harris is the author of the international best-selling self help book, The Happiness Trap.  He is a therapist and coach, as well as a world renowned trainer of acceptance and commitment therapy, otherwise known as ACT.  He has provided ACT training to over 20,000 people all around the world.

In this conversation, you will hear Russ talk about the ACT approach. He explains how individuals and organizations can use the ACT approach to work through negativity and be comfortable with accepting rather than solving.

Connect with Russ Harris:

Website: ActMindfully.com.au

You’ll Learn:

  • [01:28] - Russ talks about finding healthy ways to accept things that seem completely unacceptable.  
  • [04:07] - Russ shares how those of us that are used to a CBT approach to our challenges can get comfortable with accepting rather than solving.  
  • [07:55] - Self-compassion is an important skill to normalize being able to get comfortably uncomfortable.  Russ explains how the ACT approach works through negativity.  
  • [09:54] - Russ talks about the ideas of expansion, anchoring, pursuing the value of kindness, and connectedness with others.
  • [12:22] - Russ describes how to introduce these ideas into workplaces.  He describes his experiences with different types of work environments.
  • [17:24] - When asked about work situations where ACT approach may not be a good fit, Russ shares the range of situations where these strategies have been implemented.
  • [19:50] - The Lightning Round with Russ Harris

Your Resources:

The Happiness Trap: How to Stop Struggling and Start Living: A Guide to ACT - Russ Harris and Steven Hayes

Creativity, Inc.: Overcoming the Unseen Forces That Stand in the Way of True Inspiration - Ed Catmull and Amy Wallace

Thanks for listening!

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.  

Also, please leave an honest review for the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.

And finally, don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

Special thanks to Russ for joining me this week. Until next time, take care!

Jan 19, 2017

Jo Murray is a facilitator and change consultant with a Masters in Positive Psychology from Melbourne University.  Jo is specifically interested in how leaders in organizations can use the concept of psychological capital to improve the engagement and wellbeing of their employees.  

 While your organization may measure and track your economic, human or even social capital, have you ever considered the psychological capital?  Psychological capital is about understanding what individuals uniquely bring to their role and the organization to give it life and vitality, and their potential to be great and perform at extraordinary levels.  By providing meaningful and productive feedback to your staff based on the components of psychological capital  - hope, self-efficacy, resilience, optimism -  you can unlock the performance potential of your team.
 

You’ll Learn:

  • [01:33] - Jo explains that psychological capital is simply described as the notion of who you are and, more importantly, who you’re becoming.
  • [02:44] – As an organization leader it means tapping into when your employees enjoy their job, are motivated and optimistic about improving their performance.
  • [03:36] - People who are higher in psychological capital are more engaged, involved, and rewarded by the work they do.  
  • [04:27] - Jo explains how psychological capital is the dynamic interplay between hope, self-efficacy, resilience, and optimism (HERO).
  • [08:10] – You can use these four elements of psychological capital by firstly becoming conscious of what you’re doing as a leader and then using as a basis when you manage performance or provide feedback to your staff.  
  • [09:53] - Jo shares her experiences and thoughts on how organizations can introduce the practices of psychological capital into workplaces.
  • [12:04] - Jo talks about the importance of understanding why and being ready to introduce the concept of psychological capital into an organization.
  • [14:50] - Jo shares one example of introducing psychological capital into a challenging workplace and the benefits of providing feedback in a meaningful, productive way that actually unlocks performance.
  • [17:34] – Jo explains how you can find more information on psychological capital and learn how to introduce it into your workplace.
  • [18:46] - The Lightning Round with Jo Murray.

Your Resources:

The Gifts of Imperfect Parenting: Raising Children with Courage, Compassion, and Connection - Brené Brown

Practicing Positive Leadership: Tools and Techniques That Create Extraordinary Results - Kim Cameron

Flourish: A Visionary New Understanding of Happiness and Well-being - Martin E. P. Seligman

How to Be a Positive Leader: Small Actions, Big Impact - Jane E Dutton and Gretchen Spreitzer

Thanks for listening!

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.  

Also, please leave an honest review for the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.

And finally, don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

Special thanks to Jo for joining me this week. Until next time, take care!

Jan 12, 2017

Kathleen Cator is a clinical psychologist and former nurse with over 20 years’ experience as a health professional. Kathleen leads self-compassion and mindfulness based training and therapies in public, education, and health care settings.

Self-compassion is about treating yourself during difficult or challenging times as you would a good friend - with kindness, understanding and encouragement. While it’s easy to believe that by being critical of your faults and failings you are more likely to be motivated to make changes, however this has actually been found to undermine your progress. However, when you practice self-compassion you are more likely to learn from your mistakes, and improve your motivation, performance, and wellbeing.

Connect with Kathleen Cator

Website:  http://mettahp.com.au/

You’ll Learn:

  • [01:24] - Kathleen explains how you can use the same principles of showing compassion to others, to be compassionate to yourself.
  • [02:43] – Research has found that self-compassion improves your emotional and physical wellbeing, your relationships, and can help you make positive changes.
  •  [06:45] - Your brain has evolved to make you safe, and so focuses on possible threats. You can use mindfulness to choose a more self-compassionate response.
  •  [07:48] - Kathleen describes the three steps in practicing self-compassion.
  • [09:50] - Kathleen shares some simple self-compassion practices that you can try in the workplace.
  • [12:44] - Kathleen explains the relationship between self-compassion and mindfulness.
  • [14:23] - Kathleen discusses how leaders can encourage the practice of self-compassion.  
  • [15:54] – Kathleen raises the challenges of introducing self-compassion into workplaces.  
  • [17:03] - The Lightning Round with Kathleen Cator

Your Resources:

The Museum of Modern Love - by Heather Rose
Metta Learning Tools

Thanks for listening!

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.  

Also, please leave an honest review for the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.

And finally, don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

Special thanks to Kathleen for joining me this week. Until next time, take care!

Jan 5, 2017

Louisa Jewell is a speaker, author, facilitator, and wellbeing teacher who has inspired thousands of people worldwide to be more confident.  She founded the Canadian Positive Psychology Association and her work has been featured in numerous publications.

In this conversation, you will hear Louisa share her thoughts on developing more confidence, to help you and your organization become more innovative.  Louisa believes confidence is finding the courage to act in the moment you want to put a great idea forward.  While some self-doubt can be motivating, too much self-doubt and self-questioning can stop you in your tracks and undermine your wellbeing.

Connect with Louisa Jewell

You’ll Learn:

  • [01:48] - Louisa talks about the importance of innovation in today’s business-world, and to be innovative organizations need people with the confidence to speak up about their great ideas.
  • [04:05] - Louisa shares how confidence means having the courage to act in that moment when you have a great idea .
  • [06:08] - Wile some self-doubt can motivate you to be better prepared as you move forward, you need to let go of chronic self-doubt.
  • [08:20] - “Fail fast, fail often” is a popular motto right now, but to make this work Louisa suggests organizations  need structures to make it safe to fail.  
  • [15:36] - Louisa believes leaders should consider how they can encourage small steps to success, and build  problem-solving muscles within their teams.
  • [19:35] - Louisa shares some advice if you feel that your organization isn't a confidence-enabling environment.  
  • [21:30] - Failure does not feel good and Louisa talks about how you can become comfortable with failure.
  • [24:36] - The Lightning Round with Louisa Jewell

Your Resources:

Thanks for listening!

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.  

Also, please leave an honest review for the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.

And finally, don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

Special thanks to Louisa for joining me this week. Until next time, take care!

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