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Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast

If you believe as I do that by uncovering tested, practical ways to help people move from functioning to flourishing at work, we can better navigate the incredible challenges and opportunities our world faces, then this podcast is for you. My goal each week is to give you access to the world’ leading positive psychology, positive organizational scholarship and neuroscience researchers and practitioners to explore their latest research findings on how you can improve wellbeing, develop strengths, nurture positive relationships, make work meaningful and cultivate the grit to accomplish what matters most. If you want evidence-based approaches to bringing out the best in yourself and others at work, then consider this podcast your step-by-step guide.
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Now displaying: 2018
Sep 14, 2018

Today’s Guest:

Today we're talking to Rob Baker, who's a specialist at bringing positive psychology to workplaces, and strives to be a force for good in the world of work. A graduate of the Masters of Applied Positive Psychology programme at Melbourne University, Rob is the founder and chief positive deviant of a leading evidence-based positive psychology, well-being, and HR consultancy called Tailored Thinking. His ideas and research on how people can personalize work and bring their whole and best selves to the workplace have been presented at academic and professional conferences around the world.

In this episode, we discuss how job crafting leads to greater engagement and productivity in the workplace. 

Connect with Rob:

Website:  tailoredthinking.co.uk/

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You’ll Learn:

  • [02:15] - Rob explains what job crafting is and how it might help us at work
  • [03:30] - Rob explains what researchers are finding out about the potential benefits of job crafting for employees and for workplaces.
  • [05:45] - Rob explains why we need more flexible approaches to job descriptions as many jobs continue to become more complex and unpredictable.
  • [06:38] - Rob shares practical examples of how people can engage in task crafting, relational crafting and purpose crafting at work.
  • [10:35] - Rob offers simple steps for micro crafting your job.
  • [14:15] - Rob explores how on-the-spot job crafting may benefit people as they go about their jobs.
  • [16:09] - Rob explains how leaders can help their people to job craft.
  • [18:11] - Rob offers some cautions on when job crafting is likely to be less effective in workplaces.
  • [21:07] - Rob completes the lightning round.

Your Resources:

 

Thanks for listening!

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.

Please leave an honest review for the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.  And don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

You can also listen to all the episodes of Making Positive Psychology Work streamed directly to your smartphone or iPad through stitcher. No need for downloading or syncing.

Until next time, take care!  Thank you Rob!

Sep 7, 2018

Today we’re talking to Dr. Fred Luskin, who founded and currently serves as Director of the Stanford University Forgiveness Projects. Fred is also a senior consultant in Health Promotion and Wellness at Stanford University’s health center, where he teaches classes on positive psychology, the art and science of meditation, forgiveness, wellness, flourishing, and the psychology of storytelling to undergraduate and graduate students, and conducts numerous workshops and staff development trainings in relationship enhancement, stress management, and positive psychology through the Stanford Be Well program. He’s the author of several best-selling books, including Forgive For Good: A Proven Prescription for Health and Happiness, and has been interviewed by mere outlets around the world.

In this episode, we discuss how forgiveness can help to improve our wellbeing, grit and psychological safety at work.

Connect with Fred:

Website:  https://learningtoforgive.com/

You’ll Learn:

  • [02:02] - Fred explains the value of forgiveness in workplaces.
  • [02:51] - Fred shares how the Stanford Forgiveness Project has helped to improve forgiveness in workplaces.
  • [04:48] - Fred outline why it can be hard to forgive others at work.
  • [06:41] - Fred explains the two practices that work best when it comes to improving our ability to forgive at work.
  • [09:08] - Fred outlines the H.E.A.L method for forgiveness.
  • [12:13] - Fred explains how forgiveness can impact our levels of grit and resilience.
  • [13:08] - Fred shares how forgiveness shapes our relationships at work.
  • [16:20] - Fred explores how important it is for us to be able to forgive ourselves.
  • [17:30] - Fred shares his thoughts on the intersection of forgiveness and psychological safety.
  • [18:20] - Fred explains how we can intelligently forgive at work so we don’t get taken advantage of.
  • [20:12] - Fred shares some of the bottom-line outcomes he has found in workplaces who teach the skills of forgiveness.
  • [21:43] - Fred completes the lightning round.

Your Resources:

Thanks for listening!

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.

Please leave an honest review for the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.  And don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

You can also listen to all the episodes of Making Positive Psychology Work streamed directly to your smartphone or iPad through stitcher. No need for downloading or syncing.

Until next time, take care!  Thank you Fred!

Aug 31, 2018

Today we’re talking to Darren Coppin, who is a Ph.D. researcher and businessman, who implements positive psychology methods, not because of any deep-seated faith in the movement’s principles, but because it works. Darren’s mother is an outrageous hippy who is at one with the universe, so Darren over-zealously tries to ensure that everything he says and does is evidence-based. In that vein, since 2014, over 105000 people have been through his government-funded model to increase the return to work rates for welfare recipients, and these tools are now being adopted by higher education and apprenticeship institutions around the world.

In this episode, we discuss how to optimize people’s motivation and resilience for work.

Connect with Darren:

Website:  Darren Coppin on LinkedIn

You’ll Learn:

  • [02:01] - Darren explains how the motivation for behavior change is often misunderstood in workplaces.
  • [03:26] - Darren shares how he’s applied the principles of behavior change to help long-term unemployed people find work.
  • [06:23] - Darren outlines how he’s applied the principles for motivation to help secure funding for his program from key stakeholders.
  • [08:45] - Darren shares what his research has found about the most effective positive psychology practices for improving resilience and accomplishment for job seekers.
  • [10:49] - Darren explains why fusing resilience interventions and coaching can be a powerful way to create behavior change.
  • [14:43] - Darren explains how workplaces can provide the right type of support at the right time to improve people’s resilience.
  • [16:12] - Darren explains how workplaces can better support people’s levels of resilience.
  • [20:28] - Darren shares the impact teaching resilience skills to long-term unemployed job seekers has been having.
  • [21:23] - Darren completes the lightning round.

Your Resources:

Thanks for listening!

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.

Please leave an honest review for the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.  And don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

You can also listen to all the episodes of Making Positive Psychology Work streamed directly to your smartphone or iPad through stitcher. No need for downloading or syncing.

Until next time, take care!  Thank you Darren!

Aug 24, 2018

Today we’re talking to James and Janice Prochaska. Jim is the Director of the Cancer Prevention Research Center and Professor of Clinical and Health Psychology at the University of Rhode Island and is internationally recognized for his work as a developer of the stage model of behavior change for which he has won numerous awards, including being one of the Top Five Most Cited Authors in Psychology from the American Psychology Society. He is the author of over 400 publications, including four books of which the latest is Changing to Thrive which he co-authored with his wife Janice, who is one of the most published authors in the field of social work having applied the model of behavior change to cutting-edge issues.

In this episode, we discuss the stages of change most people move through and how understanding this process can help to improve people’s wellbeing and enable leader’s to embed positive changes in workplaces.

Connect with James & Janice:

Website: jprochaska.com

You’ll Learn:

  • [02:13] - Jim outlines the stages that his research has found people move through when they are creating changes.
  • [06:41] - Jim explains some of the new breakthroughs his research has found recently about how changes can be made to enhance people’s wellbeing.
  • [08:23] - Jim shares why it’s important to meet people where they are when it comes to creating change in order to move them into action.
  • [11:21] - Jan shares her tips for helping people to take effective actions to create the changes they want.
  • [13:15] - Jim shares his tips for how we can maintain our motivation for the changes we’ve started making.
  • [18:43] - Jim explains what happens when our desired change behaviors become unstuck.
  • [20:00] - Jim explains how the stages of change can overlap.
  • [21:58] - Jim outlines how leaders can use the stages of change to help people thrive at work.
  • [24:42] - Jim completes the lightning round.

Your Resources:

Thanks for listening!

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.

Please leave an honest review for the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.  And don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

You can also listen to all the episodes of Making Positive Psychology Work streamed directly to your smartphone or iPad through stitcher. No need for downloading or syncing.

Until next time, take care!  Thank you Jim & Jan!

Aug 17, 2018

Today we’re talking to Dr. Acacia Parks, who is the chief scientist at Happify, an online platform that turns the science of happiness into activities and games to create lasting changes and whose research focuses on self help methods for increasing happiness via books and digital technology with an emphasis on objective, observable outcomes such as physical health indicators. Acacia regularly publishes articles in scientific journals, has edited three books, and is also the associate editor at The Journal of Positive Psychology.

In this episode, we explore how positive psychology and wellbeing interventions can be delivered in workplaces through technology platforms like Happify to create behavior changes that stick.

Connect with Acacia:

Website: happify.com

You’ll Learn:

  • [02:05] - Acacia explains how positive psychology interventions can be delivered through technology platforms to create behavior change that sticks
  • [03:19] - Acacia outlines how the Happify technology platform works
  • [04:40] - Acacia shares the STAGE framework Happify uses to classify different types of wellbeing interventions for users
  • [07:16] - Acacia weighs up the pros and cons of using technology to improve people’s wellbeing
  • [09:31] - Acacia explains some behavior changes are better suited for technology platforms than others
  • [11:32] - Acacia explores the potential of wearable devices to improve our wellbeing
  • [13:23] - Acacia provides an example of how workplaces are using wellbeing technology platforms like Happify to improve their employees’ wellbeing
  • [14:40] - Acacia explains how artificial intelligence may shape wellbeing interventions in the future
  • [17:48] - Acacia shares the impact Happify is having on people’s wellbeing
  • [22:54] - Acacia completes the lightning round.

Your Resources:

Thanks for listening!

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.

Please leave an honest review for the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.  And don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

You can also listen to all the episodes of Making Positive Psychology Work streamed directly to your smartphone or iPad through stitcher. No need for downloading or syncing.

Until next time, take care!  Thank you Acacia!

Aug 10, 2018

Today we’re talking to Alex Linley and Trudy Bailey from Capp, whose vision is to match the world to their perfect job. Alex is one of the early leaders in positive psychology and its applications, particularly around strengths, and he’s the author of From Average to A+. Trudy’s been responsible for the relaunch of Capp’s Strength Profile tool and ensuring that practitioners have access to the tools to build a strengths-based culture that’s sustaining.

In this episode, we discuss the business case for understanding how the use, energy, and performance of our strengths can improve our performance, wellbeing and business outcomes.

Connect with Alex & Trudy:

Website: 

You’ll Learn:

  • [02:22 - Alex summarizes his three most important findings on developing people’s strengths at work.
  • [04:25] - Trudy shares new research on how using our strengths can help us to achieve our goals.
  • [05:48] - Trudy explains how the Strengths Profile tool works to help people develop their strengths.
  • [07:32] - Alex explains how understanding the use, energy, and performance impact of our strengths is so important for their development.
  • [10:05] - Trudy offers some practical tips on how to make the most of people’s strengths at work.
  • [12:47] - Alex outlines how a strengths approach can be used to help match people to their perfect jobs and the business benefits it can bring.
  • [17:10] - Trudy provides some practical approaches for leaders to develop their people’s strengths as they go about their jobs.
  • [19:04] - Alex shares his three alarm bells when it comes to workplaces wanting to take a strengths approach.
  • [21:52] - Alex shares his thoughts on the single biggest challenge for organizations to remain strengths focused.
  • [23:44] - Alex & Trudy completes the lightning round.

Your Resources:

Thanks for listening!

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.

Please leave an honest review for the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.  And don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

You can also listen to all the episodes of Making Positive Psychology Work streamed directly to your smartphone or iPad through stitcher. No need for downloading or syncing.

Until next time, take care!  Thank you Alex & Trudy!

Aug 2, 2018

Pernille is an experienced Business Consultant, Trusted Advisor, Facilitator, Board Member, Author and Speaker with a specialty within the Future of Leadership & Work, Change Management & Strategy Execution, Organizational Culture and Development. Passionate about developing Organizations, Leaders, and Leadership Teams from a Strengths-Based Perspective, focusing on their Core Ideology and how to add value to the world.

In today’s episode, we cover the strengths-based approach to leadership and team development, and how focusing on these strengths has greater effectiveness than trying to improve peoples weaknesses.

Connect with Pernille:

Website: https://hippebrun.com/

You’ll Learn:

  • [01:51] - Pernille gives the business case for a strengths-focused approach.
  • [06:05] - Pernille explains how the acronym IDEAL PIT helps to remember the philosophy behind a strengths-based approach.
  • [10:47] - Pernille explains how to run strengths-based meetings at work.
  • [12:46] - Pernille covers using a strengths-focused approach for conflict resolution
  • [14:46] - Pernille talks about giving strength-based feedback.
  • [18:46] - Pernille completes the lightning round.

Your Resources:

Thanks for listening!

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.

Please leave an honest review for the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.  And don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

You can also listen to all the episodes of Making Positive Psychology Work streamed directly to your smartphone or iPad through stitcher. No need for downloading or syncing.

Until next time, take care!  Thank you Pernille!

Jul 27, 2018

Rasmus Hougaard is the founder and managing director of Potential Project, a global leadership training, organizational development and research firm, who help leaders and organization to enhance performance, innovation, and resilience through mindfulness and other practices grounded in neuroscience and research. Rasmus writes for the Harvard Business Review, Forbes, and Business Insider, and has led more than 1500 keynotes and workshops around the world. His most recent book, The Mind of the Leader, is based on research with more than 35,000 leaders and executives and provides a pathway to great leadership in the 21st century.

In today’s episode, Rasmus explains why 21st century leaders need to cultivate the qualities of mindfulness, selflessness and compassion for themselves, their teams and their organizations and how this can be practically achieved.

Connect with Rasmus:

Website: www.potentialproject.com

You’ll Learn:

  • [02:11] - Rasmus explains why 86% of leaders rate themselves as inspiring and good role models, but 82% of employees see their leaders as fundamentally uninspiring.
  • [03:28] - Rasmus explains how leaders can better understand themselves and their impact on others.
  • [04:56] - Rasmus shares the mental qualities needed for leaders to be effective in the 21t century based on his research.
  • [05:53] - Rasmus explains why the state of flow can impede our ability to be more mindful at work.
  • [07:38] - Rasmus shares how our daily focus pattern can help us to be more mindful at work.
  • [09:33] - Rasmus explains what leaders can do practically to improve their levels of selflessness and confidence.
  • [11:44] - Rasmus shares his suggestions for finding the balance between self-confidence and selflessness at work.
  • [13:57] - Rasmus explains why more leaders are rating compassion important or extremely important for effective leadership.
  • [17:04] - Rasmus explains how teaching leaders compassion can improve kindness and psychological safety in workplaces.
  • [22:43] - Rasmus shares some of his favorite ways to help leaders be more mindful, selfless and compassionate.
  • [17:23] - Rasmus completes the lightning round.

Your Resources:

Thanks for listening!

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.

Please leave an honest review for the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.  And don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

You can also listen to all the episodes of Making Positive Psychology Work streamed directly to your smartphone or iPad through stitcher. No need for downloading or syncing.

Until next time, take care!  Thank you Rasmus!

Jul 20, 2018

Dr. Jason Fox is a motivational speaker, best selling author, leadership advisor and wizard rogue of ace repute. Often sought for his fresh perspectives, contemporary philosophies, and deep expertise in motivation design, Jason shows forward-thinking leaders around the world how to unlock new progress and pry deeper into uncharted territory. His clients include Fortune 500 companies around the world, and he’s also the best selling author of “The Game Changer” and “How to Lead a Quest: A Handbook for Pioneering Leaders”. His research has been featured in the likes of Smart Company, Huffington Post, BRW, and the Financial Review.

In today’s episode, we discuss how leaders can challenge the mindsets that keep them stuck in conventional thinking, by embracing the principals of motivational design and framing change opportunities as quests.

Connect with Jason:

Website: www.drjasonfox.com

You’ll Learn:

  • [02:14] - Jason explains how game design can be used to motivate behavior change in workplaces.
  • [04:13] - Jason explains where gamification often goes wrong when it comes to creating meaningful behavior change.
  • [05:02] - Jason shares how a quest – rather than a game – can help leaders bring out the best in themselves and others.
  • [08:30] - Jason explains some of the thinking patterns in workplaces that can limit our ability to create change.
  • [13:18] - Jason shares how he runs leadership programs to help leaders challenge their traditional ideas about what being a successful leader looks like.
  • [15:43] - Jason shares how he helps leaders to maintain momentum for behavior change following workshops and training programs.
  • [17:23] - Jason completes the lightning round.

Your Resources:

Thanks for listening!

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.

Please leave an honest review for the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.  And don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

You can also listen to all the episodes of Making Positive Psychology Work streamed directly to your smartphone or iPad through stitcher. No need for downloading or syncing.

Until next time, take care!  Thank you Jason!

Jul 13, 2018

Dr. Laura Morgan Roberts is a teaching professor of management at Georgetown University, whose research examines how leaders cultivate positive identities in diverse work organization. Laura’s publications ‘How to Apply Your Strengths’ and ‘Creating A Positive Professional Image’ are among the most popular articles from Harvard Business Publishing and have been featured in several media outlets. She’s the editor of numerous books including Exploring Positive Identities in Organizations with Jane Dutton and is a co-founder of RPAQ Solutions, a research and consulting firm that brings strength-based practices to leaders who seek extraordinary performance and personal fulfillment.

In today’s episode, we discuss creating a positive work identity, and the effect it has on our personal brand, our sense of meaning and our relationships at work.

Connect with Laura:

Website: lauramorganroberts.com

You’ll Learn:

  • [02:43] - Laura explains what it means to have a positive work-related identity
  • [09:32] - Laura introduces the GIVE model to help us build more positive identities at work.
  • [15:36] - Laura explains how cultivating a positive identity can shape your personal brand.
  • [19:23] - Laura shares how psychological safety can impact people’s ability to build a positive work-related identity.
  • [24:23] - Laura completes the lightning round.

Your Resources:

Thanks for listening!

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.

Please leave an honest review for the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.  And don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

You can also listen to all the episodes of Making Positive Psychology Work streamed directly to your smartphone or iPad through stitcher. No need for downloading or syncing.

Until next time, take care!  Thank you Laura!

Jul 6, 2018

Leah Weiss is a researcher, lecturer, consultant, and author who teaches compassionate leadership at the Stanford Graduate School of Business, where she created the perennially waitlisted course, Leading With Mindfulness and Compassion. Leah is a principal teacher, and a founding faculty member of Stanford’s Compassion Cultivation Programme conceived by the Dali Llama. Her first book “How We Work: Live Your Purpose, Reclaim your Sanity and Embrace the Daily Grind” focuses on developing compassionate and soft skill-based leadership, while also offering research backed actionable steps towards finding purpose at work.

In today’s episode, Leah talks to us about why business leaders are lining up to learning how to be more compassionate in workplaces and how this is helping them to harness the wisdom of their emotions, to fail better in order to learn and to find more purpose in their work.

Connect with Leah:

Website: leahweissphd.com

You’ll Learn:

  • [02:01] - Leah explains why graduate students are lining up to learn how to be more compassionate leaders in workplaces.
  • [04:17] - Leah explains why practicing compassion at work doesn’t mean we need to be doormats for others to take advantage of.
  • [06:32] - Leah explains the difference between compassion and empathy.
  • [09:44] - Leah provides some practical tips to harness the wisdom of our emotions at work instead of suppressing our feelings.
  • [17:03] - Leah explains how leaders can help their people to fail better at work.
  • [19:56] -  Leah provides her tips on how we can mindlessly going through our work days.
  • [21:32] - Leah completes the lightning round.

Your Resources:

Thanks for listening!

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.

Please leave an honest review for the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.  And don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

You can also listen to all the episodes of Making Positive Psychology Work streamed directly to your smartphone or iPad through stitcher. No need for downloading or syncing.

Until next time, take care!  Thank you Leah!

Jun 29, 2018

Susan David is an award willing psychologist on the faculty of Harvard Medical School, co-founder, and co-director of the Institute of Coaching at McLean Hospital, and CEO of Evidence Based Psychology, a boutique business consultancy. She’s the author of the number one Wall Street Journal best selling book “Emotional Agility,” based on her concept that Harvard Business Review heralded as a management idea of the year, and has been featured in numerous leading publications including The New York Times, Washington Post and Time Magazine, and has worked with the senior leadership of hundreds of major organisations including the United Nations, Ernst & Young, and the World Economic Forum.

In today’s episode, we’ll discuss why emotions are not simply positive or negative, and how we can navigate the way we feel in more agile and effective ways at work.

Connect with Susan:

Website: http://www.susandavid.com/

You’ll Learn:

  • [02:20] - Susan explains why thinking of emotion as positive or negative can undermine people’s ability to thrive.
  • [07:25] - Susan suggests that thinking of emotions as data, rather than as good or bad, can help people develop emotional agility.
  • [14:40] - Susan shares her recommendations for ensuring people own their emotions, rather than letting their emotions call the shots.
  • [19:16] - Susan provides tips for how teams can practice emotional agility.
  • [20:43] - Susan shares how the skills of emotional agility can build psychological safety in teams.
  • [22:39] -  Susan explains how self-compassion can make it easier to be emotionally agile.
  • [26:09] - Susan shares how tiny tweaks and the willingness to keep pushing beyond our comfort zones can enable emotional agility.
  • [24:29] - Susan completes the lightning round.

Your Resources:

Thanks for listening!

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.

Please leave an honest review for the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.  And don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

You can also listen to all the episodes of Making Positive Psychology Work streamed directly to your smartphone or iPad through stitcher. No need for downloading or syncing.

Until next time, take care!  Thank you Susan!

Jun 29, 2018

Susan David is an award willing psychologist on the faculty of Harvard Medical School, co-founder, and co-director of the Institute of Coaching at McLean Hospital, and CEO of Evidence Based Psychology, a boutique business consultancy. She’s the author of the number one Wall Street Journal best selling book “Emotional Agility,” based on her concept that Harvard Business Review heralded as a management idea of the year, and has been featured in numerous leading publications including The New York Times, Washington Post and Time Magazine, and has worked with the senior leadership of hundreds of major organisations including the United Nations, Ernst & Young, and the World Economic Forum.

In today’s episode, we’ll discuss why emotions are not simply positive or negative, and how we can navigate the way we feel in more agile and effective ways at work.

Connect with Susan:

Website: http://www.susandavid.com/

You’ll Learn:

  • [02:20] - Susan explains why thinking of emotion as positive or negative can undermine people’s ability to thrive.
  • [07:25] - Susan suggests that thinking of emotions as data, rather than as good or bad, can help people develop emotional agility.
  • [14:40] - Susan shares her recommendations for ensuring people own their emotions, rather than letting their emotions call the shots.
  • [19:16] - Susan provides tips for how teams can practice emotional agility.
  • [20:43] - Susan shares how the skills of emotional agility can build psychological safety in teams.
  • [22:39] -  Susan explains how self-compassion can make it easier to be emotionally agile.
  • [26:09] - Susan shares how tiny tweaks and the willingness to keep pushing beyond our comfort zones can enable emotional agility.
  • [24:29] - Susan completes the lightning round.

Your Resources:

Thanks for listening!

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.

Please leave an honest review for the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.  And don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

You can also listen to all the episodes of Making Positive Psychology Work streamed directly to your smartphone or iPad through stitcher. No need for downloading or syncing.

Until next time, take care!  Thank you Susan!

Jun 23, 2018

Dr. Adam Fraser is a human performance researcher and consultant who studies how organizations adopt a high-performance culture to thrive in the challenging and evolving business landscape. Adam has worked with elite-level athletes, the armed forces, and business professionals of all levels, and in the last five years, he has delivered more than 600 presentations to over 50,000 people in Australia, New Zealand, and Asia.

In today’s episode, we’ll be discussing how struggle functions as a stimulus for change in workplaces.

Connect with Adam:

Website: dradamfraser.com

You’ll Learn:

  • [02:09] - Adam shares how he’s been helping leaders at Queensland Urban Utilities evolve their mindsets and behaviors to better support their people.
  • [04:21] - Adam explains how he creates safe spaces for them to learn to lead with vulnerability.
  • [06:15] - Adam shares what his research has found about helping HR teams to thrive.
  • [08:11] - Adam expands on what his research has found about the importance of having challenging opportunities at work.
  • [14:31] - Adam explains how diversity helps to create positive disruptions in workplaces.
  • [16:44] - Adam shares how the creation of third spaces can help people to thrive.
  • [23:07] - Adam shares his tip for the hottest workplace wellbeing over the next 12 months.
  • [24:29] - Adam completes the lightning round.

Your Resources:

Thanks for listening!

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.

Please leave an honest review for the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.  And don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

You can also listen to all the episodes of Making Positive Psychology Work streamed directly to your smartphone or iPad through stitcher. No need for downloading or syncing.

Until next time, take care!  Thank you Adam!

Jun 15, 2018

Michelle is a senior fellow at the University of Melbourne and holds a Masters in Positive Psychology and a provisional Ph.D. on how AI summits create positive disruptions that enable systems to flourish. She’s the author of several books, and her newest book, “Your Change Blueprint” with Professor David Cooperrider is about to be released. Michelle also works with organizations around the world on finding ways to help people flourish.

In today’s anniversary episode, we’ll discuss Michelle’s hot of the PhD presses research findings on how AI Summits can be used to create positive disruptions that enable people and systems to flourish.

Connect with Emily:

Website: https://www.michellemcquaid.com/

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You’ll Learn:

  • [01:50] - Michelle explains how Appreciative Inquiry helps people and systems to create positive changes.
  • [03:46] - Michelle outlines how an AI Summit differs from other appreciative inquiry applications.
  • [07:03] - Michelle shares what she has observed about AI Summits around the world and their ability to help people and systems to flourish.
  • [10:26] - Michelle explains how self-determination theory shapes successful AI Summits.
  • [12:43] - Michelle explains why creating opportunities for generative connections shapes the success of an AI Summit.
  • [15:25] - Michelle shares why her research found an AI Summit needs a 6d – not a 4d – cycle to make it work.
  • [18:22] - Michelle introduces the 12 magic mechanisms that explain how to use an AI Summit to create a positive disruption.
  • [21:49] - Michelle shares her tips for when an AI Summit might most benefit your system.
  • [24:19] - Michelle completes the lightning round.

Your Resources:

Thanks for listening!

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.

Please leave an honest review for the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.  And don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

You can also listen to all the episodes of Making Positive Psychology Work streamed directly to your smartphone or iPad through stitcher. No need for downloading or syncing.

Until next time, take care!  Thank you Michelle!

Jun 8, 2018

Emily Larson serves as the director of the International Positive Education Network and is an assistant instructor in the Masters of Applied Positive Psychology program at the University of Pennsylvania. Emily has worked on various positive education projects in Nepal, India, the Philippines, the UK and the USA. She holds numerous board positions and is a published author.

In today’s episode, we’ll be discussing how schools are applying positive psychology to help improve wellbeing across the school environment and what other organizations can learn from their efforts about creating systemic change.

Connect with Emily:

Website: ipen-festival.com

You’ll Learn:

  • [01:58] - Emily explains what schools are learning about applying positive psychology findings to improve people’s wellbeing.
  • [03:05] - Emily shares why a systemic approach to improving people’s wellbeing can be so important.
  • [05:10] - Emily provides a case study of how a school is implementing a systemic approach to the wellbeing of teachers, students, and their community.
  • [10:13] - Emily shares how change champions within a system can help to embed wellbeing practices.
  • [12:09] - Emily explains the power of a common framework and common language when it comes to systemically improving wellbeing.
  • [14:05] - Emily explains some of the struggles whole system change approaches have encountered when it comes to improving people’s wellbeing.
  • [17:03] - Emily explains how positive education practitioners from around the world are coming together to share their learnings and work more closely together.
  • [23:10] - Emily completes the lightning round.

Your Resources:

Thanks for listening!

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.

Please leave an honest review for the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.  And don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

You can also listen to all the episodes of Making Positive Psychology Work streamed directly to your smartphone or iPad through stitcher. No need for downloading or syncing.

Until next time, take care!  Thank you Emily!

Jun 1, 2018

Amy Edmondson is the Novartis Professor of Leadership and Management at the Harvard Business School. She’s an expert on leadership, teams and organizational learning, whose research on psychological safety in workplaces has been discussed in the New York Times, the Financial Times, Forbes and many other media outlets around the world and is the author of several books, including her most recent, Extreme Teaming: Lessons in Complex, Cross-Sector Teaming.

In today’s episode, we discuss why Google have found that psychological safety is the common factor in all of their highest performing teams, and what you can do in your workplaces to improve psychological safety for others.

Connect with Amy:

Website:  Amy Edmonson HBS Faculty Profile

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You’ll Learn:

  • [02:03] - Amy explains why more and more workplaces are talking about the need for psychological safety.
  • [04:43] - Amy offers practical tips for leaders to improve the levels of psychological safety in their teams.
  • [06:38] - Amy explains how leaders can practice inclusive leadership to improve psychological safety.
  • [08:45] - Amy shares why courageous conversations can be problematic in workplaces.
  • [11:15] - Amy explores the intersection between psychological safety and growth mindsets.
  • [12:39] - Amy shares her tips for creating psychology safety in more temporary teams.
  • [14:10] - Amy talks about ways of assessing psychological safety in teams.
  • [16:44] - Amy explains how to help teams get over the politeness hump when it comes to improving psychological safety.
  • [19:49] - Amy outlines some of the biggest challenges leaders face when it comes to improving psychological safety at the moment in workplaces.
  • [21:18] - Amy shares why a coaching mindset can help improve psychological safety in teams.
  • [22:17] - Amy completes the lightning round.

Your Resources:

Thanks for listening!

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.

Please leave an honest review for the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.  And don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

You can also listen to all the episodes of Making Positive Psychology Work streamed directly to your smartphone or iPad through stitcher. No need for downloading or syncing.

Until next time, take care!  Thank you Amy!

May 25, 2018

Dr. Mark Williamson, who is the Co-founder and Director of Action for Happiness. Since creating and launching Action for Happiness in 2011, Mark has engaged with a vast range of organizations, projects, and people on the topics of happiness, well-being, and resilience, including leading academics, major multinational corporations, public sector organizations, policymakers, schools, charities, and community organizations. He’s led the development of all of the Action for Happiness resources and activities and has spoken regularly on related topics at events and conferences across the UK and around the world.

In today’s episode, we’ll explore how Action for Happiness are helping to improve people’s wellbeing in workplaces and communities around the world.

Connect with Mark:

Website: actionforhappiness.org/

You’ll Learn:

  • [02:04] - Mark explains how Action for Happiness became a global movement to improve people’s wellbeing.
  • [04:09] - Mark shares how Action for Happiness has mobilized wellbeing champions around the world.
  • [07:07] - Mark shares how Action For Happiness help bridges the gap between knowledge and action when it comes to improving people’s wellbeing.
  • [10:27] - Mark explains how coaching circles can provide social support for people creating behavioral changes.
  • [13:51] - Mark explains how to have meaningful conversations in workplaces about wellbeing behaviors.
  • [15:58] - Mark shares an example of a company building wellbeing practices across their workplace.
  • [17:57] - Mark explains why organizations will continue to invest in wellbeing programs over the next 12 months.
  • [21:15] - Mark completes the lightning round.

Your Resources:

Thanks for listening!

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.

Please leave an honest review for the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.  And don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

You can also listen to all the episodes of Making Positive Psychology Work streamed directly to your smartphone or iPad through stitcher. No need for downloading or syncing.

Until next time, take care!  Thank you Mark!

May 18, 2018

Paul Zak is the founding director of the Centre for Neuroeconomic Studies and professor of economics, psychology, and management at Claremont Graduate University. Paul is part of the team of scientists that first made the connection between oxytocin and trust, and this TED Talk on the topic has received over a million views. His latest book, Trust Factor, The Science of Creating High-Performance Companies uses neuroscience to measure and manage organizational cultures to inspire teamwork and accelerate business outcomes.

In today’s episode, we’ll be discussing the effects of oxytocin on trust and how heightening the OXYTOCIN factors can help to build stronger and more effective teams in workplaces.

Connect with Paul:

Website: pauljzak.com
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You’ll Learn:

  • [01:57] - Paul explains how neuromanagement works.
  • [04:33] - Paul outlines the OXYTOCIN factors that workplaces can build to improve trust in organizations.
  • [08:30] - Paul explains how to confidently share neuroscience findings as researchers continue to learn more about the brain.
  • [14:34] - Paul shares the bottom-line benefits of trust in workplaces.
  • [17:30] - Paul outlines the research on how oxytocin impacts people’s ability to trust.
  • [21:28] - Paul shares why new studies have found oxytocin can stimulate envy.
  • [23:17] - Paul completes the lightning round.

Your Resources:

Thanks for listening!

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.

Please leave an honest review for the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.  And don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

You can also listen to all the episodes of Making Positive Psychology Work streamed directly to your smartphone or iPad through stitcher. No need for downloading or syncing.

Until next time, take care!  Thank you Paul!

May 11, 2018

Dr. Elaine O’Brien is an educator, trainer, author, presenter, speaker, and pioneer in the Health, Exercise, and Fitness Industry, as well as a leader in the burgeoning science of Applied Positive Psychology. She is CEO of Lifestyle Medicine Coaching & Training, a consultancy, & FitDance: Move2Love providing training, presentations, and program content development around positive health, whole fitness, optimal performance, exercise and aging well through the lifespan. Elaine delivers positive exercise programming, and training protocols to help boost motivation, exercise adherence, enjoyment, and whole health and wellbeing across domains and through the lifespan. 

In today’s episode, we’ll be discussing the psychology of human movement and the small steps you can take in workplaces to keep people’s bodies, hearts and minds functioning at their best.

Connect with Elaine:

Website: Elaine O'Brien (LinkedIn)

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You’ll Learn:

  • [02:07] - Elaine explains the psychology of human movement and how understanding this can help to improve people’s wellbeing.
  • [06:07] - Elaine shares why workplaces are becoming more intentional in finding ways to help people move more during their days to improve our ability to learn, connect and flourish.
  • [08:22] - Elaine explains how workplaces can use energy breaks to improve people’s mood and sense of connection with each other.
  • [12:16] - Elaine shares how energy breaks can be a great opportunity for people to practice their growth mindset, develop their strengths and engage their self-compassion.
  • [14:32] - Elaine shares the latest thinking on how much movement we should be aiming for to maintain our wellbeing.
  • [16:07] - Elaine offers some tips for workplaces wanting to engage their people in their more authentic, joyful and positive movement programs.
  • [21:42] - Elaine completes the lightning round.

Your Resources:

Thanks for listening!

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.

Please leave an honest review for the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.  And don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

You can also listen to all the episodes of Making Positive Psychology Work streamed directly to your smartphone or iPad through stitcher. No need for downloading or syncing.

Until next time, take care!  Thank you Elaine!

May 4, 2018

 

Rick Hanson is a psychologist, Senior Fellow at the Greater Good Science Centre at UC Berkeley, and New York Times bestselling author. Founder of the Wellspring Institute for Neuroscience and Contemplative Wisdom, he’s been an invited speaker at NASA, Oxford, Stanford, Harvard, and other major universities, and taught in meditation centers worldwide. His books are available in 26 languages and include Hard Wiring Happiness, and his newest book, Resilient, has been featured on the BBC, CBS, and NPR.

In today’s episode, we’ll be talking about how to develop the traits of resilience to help people manage their levels of anxiety and stress in the workplace.

Connect with Rick:

Website: www.rickhanson.net/

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You’ll Learn:

  • [02:12] - Rick explains why modern life is neurologically heightening our levels of anxiety.
  • [04:38] - Rick explains how we can be more resilient in the face of constant change, uncertainty and complexity in workplaces.
  • [07:37] - Rick shares the three simple steps people can take to build resilience practices.
  • [10:48] -  Rick gives several quick techniques for improving resilience that take less than 5 minutes per day.
  • [11:47] - Rick shares the 12 neurological muscles for resilience that people can build.
  • [13:06] - Rick explains how the intensity of positive emotions impact our levels of resilience.
  • [17:44] - Rick points out the difference between building positive emotions that are state-to-state and those that are sustainable traits that boost our resilence.
  • [26:44] - Rick completes the lightning round.

Your Resources:

Thanks for listening!

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.

Please leave an honest review for the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.  And don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

You can also listen to all the episodes of Making Positive Psychology Work streamed directly to your smartphone or iPad through stitcher. No need for downloading or syncing.

Until next time, take care!  Thank you Rick!

Apr 27, 2018

Zoe Galvez and Betsy Crouch, co-founders of ImprovHQ, help leaders and organizations develop effective communication, exceptional collaboration, and engaged cultures through interactive learning experiences, based on the principles of improvisation and positive psychology. They deliver workshops, keynotes, and executive coaching programmes, to workplaces that include Twitter, Google, LinkedIn, Facebook, Dropbox, and many more.

Today we’ll be discussing how the principles and practices of improvisation can be used to teach people the skills of positive psychology in workplaces.

Connect with Betsy and Zoe:

Website: improvhq.com

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You’ll Learn:

  • [02:36] - Zoe and Betsy explain how positive psychology practices can be fused with improvisation techniques to help people flourish at work.
  • [05:40] - The Improv HQ team give examples of how improvisation skills can develop people’s resilience.
  • [09:02] - Zoe explains why every conversation at work is an opportunity for connection or confusion, and how improv can build trust and psychological safety between people.
  • [10:47] - Betsy shares how improv practices can be a great opportunity to spot people’s strengths and put them to work.
  • [12:43] - Zoe explains how improv can be an emotional rope course in workplaces and how they teach leaders to build a resilient response to failure.
  • [18:03] - Zoe shares how improv can help to build a giving culture in teams.
  • [18:59] - Betsy shares how AI Summits are using improv to supercharge results for participants.
  • [21:04] - Betsy and Zoe explain the six improv principles unscripted leaders use to thrive at work.
  • [26:58] - Betsy & Zoe complete the lightning round.

Your Resources:

Thanks for listening!

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.

Please leave an honest review for the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.  And don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

You can also listen to all the episodes of Making Positive Psychology Work streamed directly to your smartphone or iPad through stitcher. No need for downloading or syncing.

Until next time, take care!  Thank you Betsy and Zoe!

Apr 20, 2018

Dr. Tal Ben Shahar is the co-founder of the Happiness Studies Academy and the creator and instructor of the Certificate in Happiness Studies Programme. Known around the world for teaching two of the most popular courses in Harvard’s history, Positive Psychology and the Psychology of Leadership, Tal is also an international best-selling author and the co-founder of Potential Life and Happier TV.

Today we’ll be exploring the concept of wholebeing and why our happiness at work and in life is interconnected.

Connect with Tal-Ben Shahar:

Website: talbenshahar.com

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You’ll Learn:

  • [01:37] - Tal shares the impact positive psychology has had over the last decade in workplaces.
  • [02:30] - Tal talks about the need to bring together different scientific disciplines in order to further the study of happiness.
  • [04:23] - Tal introduces the concept of wholebeing and why people need to SPIRE.
  • [06:38] - Tal explains why our happiness is interconnected with our environment and what this means practically.
  • [09:36] - Tal shares how workplaces can leverage interconnectedness to improve people’s sense of wholebeing.
  • [11:47] - Tal explains how Sainsbury grocery stores in the UK are working to improve the happiness of their employees.
  • [13:38] - Tal outlines how workplaces can help people to change and sustain the behaviors that may make them happier at work.
  • [16:49] - Tal outlines how high-intensity interval training can help to embed happiness behaviors.
  • [19:08] - Tal completes the lightning round.

Your Resources:

Thanks for listening!

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.

Please leave an honest review for the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.  And don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

You can also listen to all the episodes of Making Positive Psychology Work streamed directly to your smartphone or iPad through stitcher. No need for downloading or syncing.

Until next time, take care!  Thank you Tal!

Apr 13, 2018

Jenn Lim is the CEO of Delivering Happiness, a company she and Tony Hsieh, CEO of Zappos.com, co-founded to inspire passion and purpose as part of their profitable happiness business model. To achieve this, Jenn delivers talks, interactive workshops, executive alignment sessions and culture team training for companies all over the world, and with the help of her team, they also create some wonderful tools to measure and improve happiness in workplaces.

In today’s episode, we’ll be discussing how to leverage Self-Determination Theory practices to help employees feel happier, ensure customers are more satisfied and deliver and improve the bottom line for your workplace.

Connect with Jenn Lim:

Website: deliveringhappiness.com

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You’ll Learn:

  • [02:00] - Jenn shares the story of Zappos and how they have created a flourishing culture.
  • [06:21] - Jenn explains how Self-Determination Theory provides the foundation for a happiness business model.
  • [07:36] - Jenn shares practical examples of how to improve autonomy and competence in workplaces.
  • [10:57] - Jenn explains how Zappos helps build relatedness in the workplace between managers and their teams
  • [13:45] - Jenn shares some tips and tricks for helping people in your organizational live the cultural values.
  • [17:43] - Jenn explains why Zappos offer people money to quit during their induction to ensure they have the right cultural fit.
  • [20:06] - Jenn shares some real-world examples of the kind of business outcomes organizations are achieving by investing in the happiness of their employees.
  • [24:07] - Jenn completes the lightning round.

Your Resources:

Thanks for listening!

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.

Please leave an honest review for the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.  And don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

You can also listen to all the episodes of Making Positive Psychology Work streamed directly to your smartphone or iPad through stitcher. No need for downloading or syncing.

Until next time, take care!  Thank you Jenn!

Apr 6, 2018

Dr. Timothy Sharp runs one of Australia’s most respected clinical psychology practices, is a highly regarded executive coaching practice, and is the founder and chief happiness officer of the happiness institute, Australia’s first and now largest organization devoted solely to enhancing happiness in individuals, families, and workplaces. An adjunct professor in positive psychology at the University of Technology in Sydney and RMIT University, Tim is a sought-after public speaker who makes frequent media appearances, and is the author of, among other things, “100 Ways to Happiness: A Guide for Busy People” and most recently, “Live Happier, Live Longer: A Guide to Positive Ageing”.

In today’s episode we’ll discuss how to help people find the time to integrate wellbeing practices into their workplace.

Connect with Tim Sharp:

Connect with Tim Sharp:

Website: www.drhappy.com.au/

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You’ll Learn:

  • [03:28] - Tim details the acronym CHOOSE, which relates to the idea of choosing happiness for our own lives.
  • [08:07] - Tim gives tips on how to make time for happiness practises.
  • [12:27] - Tim discusses how a workplace could embed happiness practises into the everyday lives of their employees, using the approach of mental health organisation Batyr as an example.
  • [17:48] - Tim talks about making happiness practises work for the long term, by embedding and reinforcing key principles within the organisation.
  • [21:03] - Tim gives examples of some support and activities that can be provided to improve mental health in the workplace.
  • [22.58] - Tim explains how to navigate the cynics when trying to implement wellbeing practises within a workplace.
  • [25:25] - Lightning round with Tim Sharp.

Your Resources:

Thanks for listening!

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.

Please leave an honest review for the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.  And don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

You can also listen to all the episodes of Making Positive Psychology Work streamed directly to your smartphone or iPad through stitcher. No need for downloading or syncing.

Until next time, take care!  Thank you Tim!

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