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Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast

If you believe as I do that by uncovering tested, practical ways to help people move from functioning to flourishing at work, we can better navigate the incredible challenges and opportunities our world faces, then this podcast is for you. My goal each week is to give you access to the world’ leading positive psychology, positive organizational scholarship and neuroscience researchers and practitioners to explore their latest research findings on how you can improve wellbeing, develop strengths, nurture positive relationships, make work meaningful and cultivate the grit to accomplish what matters most. If you want evidence-based approaches to bringing out the best in yourself and others at work, then consider this podcast your step-by-step guide.
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Aug 23, 2019

Michael Steger is the founder and director of the Centre for Meaning and Purpose, and a professor of psychology at Colorado State University. Endlessly curious about learning how to create a life worth living, Michael has spent the better part of two decades studying the vital role that meaning and purpose play in our work, health, relationships, growth, and happiness. His research has been featured in academic and general publications around the world, and he's also written several books on this topic, including Purpose and Meaning in the Workplace.

In this week’s episode, we explore how meaning can be found in any job, and how workplaces can help people find the right balance to minimize both boredom and burnout.

Connect with Michael Steger: 

You’ll Learn:

  • [02:29] - Michael explains why a growing number of workplaces have become interested in helping their people find more meaning in their work.
  • [05:40] - Michael shares what the research is finding when it comes to creating more meaning in our work.
  • [08:04] - Michael explains why meaning is an ongoing process when it comes to our work and some of the simple ways we can find more meaning in what we do each day.
  • [14:19] - Michael offers some tips for leaders and workplaces to help people make their work more meaningful.
  • [20:46] - Michael explains what the research is finding about having too much meaning at work, and how we can keep this in balance.
  • [25:02] - Michael completes the Lightning Round.

Your Resources:

Thanks for listening! 

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.

Please leave an honest review of the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.  And don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

You can also listen to all the episodes of Making Positive Psychology Work streamed directly to your smartphone or iPad through stitcher. No need for downloading or syncing.

Until next time, take care!  Thank you Michael!

Aug 16, 2019

Ethan Kross is a professor of psychology at the University of Michigan's top-ranked social psychology programme. He's an award-winning scientist and teacher who studies how the conversations people have with themselves impact their health, performance, decisions, and relationships. And his research has been published in academic journals and featured in the New York Times, the Economist and the New Yorker, to name just a few.

In this week’s episode, we explore how we can avoid being sucked into negativity vortex by using self-distancing and other simple hacks to improve our self-regulation at work.

Connect with Ethan Kross: 

You’ll Learn:

  • [02:03] - Ethan outlines the consequences of becoming stuck in a negativity vortex at work.
  • [03:38] - Ethan explains how the practice of self-distancing can help us to avoid the negativity vortex.
  • [05:14] - Ethan provides examples of how the language we use can help us to self-distance during moments of rumination.
  • [07:27] - Ethan shares some tips for practicing self-distancing successfully.
  • [08:47] - Ethan explains how self-distancing can be taught in workplaces.
  • [10:41] - Ethan shares some other simple hacks to help us avoid the vortex of negativity at work.
  • [13:48] - Ethan offers some insight into the current evidence-based debates on how self-control and willpower works.
  • [16:05] - Ethan explains how to avoid co-rumination when it comes to our relationships at work and instead be an effective supporter of others.
  • [19:37] - Ethan provides some cautions on using distancing wisely and not as an avoidance strategy.
  • [21:33] - Ethan completes the Lightning Round.

Your Resources:

Thanks for listening! 

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.

Please leave an honest review of the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.  And don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

You can also listen to all the episodes of Making Positive Psychology Work streamed directly to your smartphone or iPad through stitcher. No need for downloading or syncing.

Until next time, take care!  Thank you Ethan!

Aug 9, 2019

Jeremy Clifton is a doctoral candidate in psychology at the University of Pennsylvania under Dr. Martin Seligman, who is often regarded as the founder of positive psychology. After an initial career in urban economic development strategy, Jer has spent five years creating a foundational, empirically-derived typology of primal world beliefs, and his research examines many of these variables and their impact on well-being, personality traits and character strengths, professional success, depression, and voting behaviour.

In this podcast, we explore how our primal beliefs about the world impact our levels of wellbeing, trust, and success at work.

Connect with Jeremy Clifton: 

You’ll Learn:

  • [03:07] - Jer explains what his research is finding out about our primal world beliefs.
  • [05:36] - Jer helps us to understand how primals differ from our other beliefs like growth mindsets.
  • [06:58] - Jer outlines the 26 primal beliefs his research has uncovered.
  • [09:56] - Jer helps us to understand what a ‘good’ primal might mean practically for us when it comes to our work and wellbeing.
  • [12:37] - Jer explains what his research has found to date about the stability or our primal beliefs.
  • [14:45] - Jer explores if our primal beliefs are shaped by nature or nurture.
  • [17:53] - Jer shares his thoughts on whether workplaces should be trying to cultivate higher levels of specific primal beliefs like ‘good’ in order to improve wellbeing and success.
  • [20:52] - Jer explores the potential impact of primals on psychological safety in workplaces.
  • [24:49] - Jeremy completes the Lightning Round.

Your Resources:

Thanks for listening! 

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.

Please leave an honest review of the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.  And don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

You can also listen to all the episodes of Making Positive Psychology Work streamed directly to your smartphone or iPad through stitcher. No need for downloading or syncing.

Until next time, take care!  Thank you Jer!

Aug 2, 2019

Sigal Barsade is a professor of management at the Wharton School of Business and focusses her research on emotional intelligence, organizational culture, unconscious bias, teamwork, leadership, and organizational change. Having consulted for organizations of all sizes across a myriad of industries, including Cisco, Coca Cola, Deloitte, Google, the NBA, and the United Nations, Sigal’s research has been featured in leading academic research journals and in media outlets around the world.

In today’s episode, we explore why loneliness in workplaces is on the rise, how it impacts our wellbeing and performance, and how we can tackle it together. We also learn more about the contagion of loneliness and other emotions in the workplace and how we can manage this better.

Connect with Sigal Barsade: 

You’ll Learn:

  • [02:25] - Sigal explains the impact of loneliness in workplaces on our wellbeing and performance.
  • [08:57] - Sigal helps us understand why loneliness is on the rise in many workplaces.
  • [11:02] - Sigal explains what leaders and organizations can do to address the loneliness epidemic many workplaces are experiencing.
  • [14:20] - Sigal outlines how we can help lonely people help themselves in workplaces.
  • [16:23] - Sigal explores if talking about loneliness in workplaces improves people’s wellbeing or creates further isolation.
  • [18:04] - Sigal explains why loneliness can be contagious and how emotions can spread in workplaces and communities.
  • [19:21] - Sigal shares why leaders are more emotionally contagious in workplaces.
  • [21:39] - Sigal offers some tips for leaders to help manage their moods and how they infect their teams more mindfully at work.
  • [23:32] - Sigal offers some insights for leaders to positive infect the mood in their team.
  • [26:03] - Sigal completes the Lightning Round.

Your Resources:

Thanks for listening! 

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.

Please leave an honest review of the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.  And don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

You can also listen to all the episodes of Making Positive Psychology Work streamed directly to your smartphone or iPad through stitcher. No need for downloading or syncing.

Until next time, take care!  Thank you Sigal!

Jul 25, 2019

Dr. Kelly McGonigal is a health psychologist and lecturer at Stanford University. As a pioneer in the field of science help, her mission is to translate insights from psychology and neuroscience into practical strategies that support personal wellbeing and strengthen communities.

Kelly is the author of several books, including the international bestseller, The Willpower Instinct, The Upside Of Stress, and her upcoming book, The Joy Of Movement. Her TED Talk, How To Make Stress Your Friend, is one of the most viewed TED Talks of all time with over 20 million views.

In today’s podcast, we explore how we can tap into our different stress responses to shape our wellbeing and performance at work.

Connect with Kelly McGonigal: 

You’ll Learn:

  • [03:12] - Kelly shares some of the latest research insights on the upside of stress when it comes to our wellbeing and performance at work.]
  • [06:45] - Kelly explains biologically how our fight-or-flight stress response helps us to engage better with life.
  • [07:53] - Kelly shares how a challenge stress response can help us step up in challenging situations.
  • [10:16] - Kelly explains how a social stress response can help us reach for courage and connection during challenging experiences.
  • [14:37] - Kelly outlines how our resilience stress response works to help us learn and grow in the face of difficult or traumatic experiences.
  • [18:46] - Kelly explains how we can trigger the stress responses that will serve us best as we navigate work and life.
  • [21:49] - Kelly recommends some exercises to help build our levels of stress confidence so we can respond in the ways that serve us and others best.
  • [27:24] - Kelly shares her tips on how we can help to shape the conversations about reducing stress in workplaces.
  • [33:38] - Kelly completes the Lightning Round.

Your Resources:

Thanks for listening! 

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.

Please leave an honest review of the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.  And don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

You can also listen to all the episodes of Making Positive Psychology Work streamed directly to your smartphone or iPad through stitcher. No need for downloading or syncing.

Until next time, take care!  Thank you Kelly!

Jul 12, 2019

Dr Peggy Kern who is an associate professor at the Centre for Positive Psychology at the University of Melbourne’s Graduate School of Education. Her research is collaborative in nature and draws on a variety of methodologies to examine questions around who thrives in life and why. She is the world’s leading researcher on measuring wellbeing using the PERMAH pillars, and has published 2 books and over 80 peer-reviewed articles and chapters.

In today’s episode, we explore how systems informed positive psychology is can help workplaces to think more holistically about their wellbeing strategies and the tools that researchers and practitioners can use to help them take a systems approach.

Connect with Peggy Kern: 

You’ll Learn:

  • [02:37] - Peggy explains why we need a systems-informed approach when it comes to improving wellbeing in our workplaces.
  • [04:01] - Peggy defines how a systems-informed positive psychology approach makes visible what is invisible.
  • [05:19] - Peggy shares some of the underlying assumptions of positive psychology research and practices that limit our ability to positively impact a system.
  • [07:51] - Peggy offers some tips for helping leaders embrace “simplexity’ when it comes to understanding how to impact wellbeing in their workplace.
  • [09:59] - Peggy explores how we can better understand what is happening across a workplace to create a systems-informed approach for improving wellbeing.
  • [11:28] - Peggy explains how Appreciative Inquiry approaches can be used to help map a system's response for workplaces wanting to improve wellbeing.
  • [15:31] - Peggy shares how mapping energy networks in workplaces can help identify the best people and teams to target for wellbeing interventions in the system.
  • [17:54] - Peggy explains why a systems-informed mindset needs us to let go of the illusion of control and instead learn to dance between order and chaos.
  • [21:26] - Peggy shares why creating feedback loops is an important part of any systems informed strategy to improve wellbeing.
  • [23:41] - Peggy explains how thinking though a systems lens can help us to build our growth mindsets, psychological safety, and self-compassion.
  • [23:41] - Peggy explains why systems are always changing and what this means for our workplace wellbeing strategies.
  • [27:39] - Peggy completes the Lightning Round.

Your Resources:

Thanks for listening! 

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.

Please leave an honest review of the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.  And don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

You can also listen to all the episodes of Making Positive Psychology Work streamed directly to your smartphone or iPad through stitcher. No need for downloading or syncing.

Until next time, take care!  Thank you Peggy!

Jul 5, 2019

Jerry Colonna is the CEO and Co-Founder of reboot.io, an executive coaching and leadership development firm dedicated to the notion that better humans make better leaders. After many years as a partner and founder of private equity firms, Jerry has spent the last 20 years using the knowledge gained as an investor, an executive, and a board member for more than 100 organizations, to help entrepreneurs and others to lead with humanity, resilience, and equanimity to overcome the psychological baggage that has held them back professionally. In his new book 'reboot, leadership and the art of growing up', Jerry captures his unique blend of Buddhism, Jungian therapy and entrepreneurial insight. 

In this week’s episode, we explore why better humans make better leaders, and what we can do practically to improve our leadership and resilience skills as we work.

Connect with Jerry Colonna: 

You’ll Learn:

  • [02:37] - Jerry explains why better humans make better leaders.
  • [04:01] - Jerry shares why so many leaders struggle to prioritize becoming better human beings.
  • [05:19] - Jerry outlines why we tend to be fixated on outcomes in workplaces, even when this approach often burns us out.
  • [07:51] - Jerry explains the simple steps we can take to become more effective and resilient leaders who don’t burn ourselves out.
  • [09:59] - Jerry offers some questions to help us create a sense of wellbeing and discover the kind of leaders we are capable of being.
  • [11:28] - Jerry explains how our stories about our past, present, and future shape our belief systems and the outcomes we’re able to achieve.
  • [15:31] - Jerry offers some tips to help leaders challenge the stories that undermine their resilience and effectiveness as leaders.
  • [17:54] - Jerry explains how our willingness to be better humans helps us to build more psychological safety in our workplaces.
  • [21:26] - Jerry explains how why becoming a better human being is an ongoing process and how we can navigate it gracefully.
  • [23:41] - Jerry shares his formula for enhancing leadership and building greater resiliency.
  • [27:39] - Jerry completes the Lightning Round.

Your Resources:

Thanks for listening! 

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.

Please leave an honest review of the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.  And don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

You can also listen to all the episodes of Making Positive Psychology Work streamed directly to your smartphone or iPad through stitcher. No need for downloading or syncing.

Until next time, take care!  Thank you Jerry!

Jun 28, 2019

Nataly Kogan is the creator of the Happier Method, and an entrepreneur, speaker, and author, whose mission is to help millions of people optimize their emotional health through science-backed practical skills, so they can thrive in work and life.
She's the founder of Happier, whose online courses, Happier@Work Training Programmes, and her book Happier Now, have helped more than a million people live their best life.

In this week’s episode we explore why happiness is a set of skills that workers can build in any organization, and the small, practical ways this can be incorporated into even the busiest of days.

Connect with Nataly Kogan: 

You’ll Learn:

  • [03:11] - Nataly shares the many benefits researchers are finding of having happier employees in workplaces.
  • [05:53] - Nataly offers some tips for helping skeptical leaders discover the value of having happier employees.
  • [09:02] - Nataly explains why our goal shouldn’t be perfecting the skills of happiness if we want to be happier.
  • [11:57] - Nataly explains why measuring people’s levels of confidence and motivation to shape their wellbeing may be a better goal than overall happiness.
  • [13:45] - Nataly explains how we can build our happiness skills at work.
  • [15:46] - Nataly outlines the five key happiness skills every worker needs.
  • [20:23] - Nataly provides some examples of how these happiness skills can be built in practices that take no more than a few minutes as people go about their jobs.
  • [25:40] - Nataly offers some advice on how to help busy leaders embed these happiness skills into the way they work each day.
  • [28:16] - Nataly completes the Lightning Round.

Your Resources:

Thanks for listening! 

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.

Please leave an honest review of the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.  And don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

You can also listen to all the episodes of Making Positive Psychology Work streamed directly to your smartphone or iPad through stitcher. No need for downloading or syncing.

Until next time, take care!  Thank you Nataly!

Jun 21, 2019

Mandy O'Neill is an associate professor of management at the George Mason University School of Business. Mandy's research focuses on how conceptualizing organizational culture as a function of emotions and gender enhances the link between culture and a number of individual teams, organizational processes, and outcomes, including decision making, attitudes, career success, health behavior, corporate strategy, and financial performance. Her research has been featured in journal and media publications all over the world.

In this week’s episode, we explore why leaders and teams need to invest in creating healthy emotional cultures and the practical steps they can take based on the latest research in workplaces.

Connect with Mandy O'Neill: 

You’ll Learn:

  • [02:54] - Mandy explains what her research has found about the importance and bottom-line value of intentionally, managing the emotional culture of an organization.
  • [04:48] - Mandy outlines what an emotional culture strategy might look like practically in workplaces.
  • [07:21] - Mandy explains why creating a healthy emotional culture doesn't mean leaders should try to eliminate negativity.
  • [10:12] - Mandy shares an example of how a health organization intentionally improved their emotional culture.
  • [13:09] - Mandy offers guidance on the best ways to measure a workplace’s emotional culture.
  • [17:03] - Mandy provides some tips for how we can practically improve the emotional culture of our workplaces and create more affection, caring, and concern for each other.
  • 21:45] - Mandy offers some suggestions for navigating more uncomfortable conversations with each other.
  • [25:20] - Mandy completes the Lightning Round.

Your Resources:

Thanks for listening! 

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.

Please leave an honest review of the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.  And don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

You can also listen to all the episodes of Making Positive Psychology Work streamed directly to your smartphone or iPad through stitcher. No need for downloading or syncing.

Until next time, take care!  Thank you Mandy!

Jun 14, 2019

Chris Myers is an assistant professor in the management and organization discipline, the academic director of executive education at the John Hopkins University Carey Business School and holds a joint appointment in anesthesiology at the John Hopkins University School of Medicine. Chris' research and teaching focuses on individual learning, leadership development and innovation with particular attention to how people learn vicariously and share knowledge and his work has been recognized with several scholarly awards and has been featured in a range of leading academic journals and popular media articles and outlets.

In this week’s podcast, we explore why focusing on learning opportunities can help workers to manage their levels of stress and how opportunities for coactive vicarious learning ensures there are no passive observers to the learning process.

 

Connect with Chris Myers: 

You’ll Learn:

  • [02:53] - Chris explains why focusing on learning opportunities, rather than gritting our teeth, grinding through or taking a break, can be a more effective way of dealing with stress at work.
  • [05:59] - Chris offers some tips to help us reach for learning opportunities during moments of stress.
  • [07:56] - Chris shares some examples of how workplaces are encouraging their workers to reach for more learning opportunities.
  • [09:34] - Chris explains why when teams engage together in learning behaviour, they report significantly lower levels of burnout.
  • [11:08] - Chris outlines how learning together in teams helps to improve workers growth mindsets and their levels of psychological safety.
  • [12:07] - Chris explains why the process of vicarious learning has been found to be one of the most effective ways for teams to learn together.
  • [13:53] - Chris walks us through how coactive vicarious learning takes our ability to learn together a step further, by ensuring there are no passive observers to the learning process.
  • [18:19] - Chris provides some tips on how the process of coactive vicarious learning could be used to amplify the use of wellbeing strategies in workplaces.
  • [20:20] - Chris offers some caveats and cautions for supporting coactive vicarious learning in your workplace.
  • [22:58] - Chris completes the Lightning Round.

Your Resources:

 

Thanks for listening! 

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.

Please leave an honest review of the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.  And don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

You can also listen to all the episodes of Making Positive Psychology Work streamed directly to your smartphone or iPad through stitcher. No need for downloading or syncing.

Until next time, take care!  Thank you Chris!

Jun 7, 2019

Johann Berlin is the CEO of the T-lex Institute, who work with fortune 500 companies to create resilience in businesses by using restorative techniques and authentic engagement to strengthen the energy and connections between individuals, teams, and organizations to achieve a greater purpose. Featured in the Harvard Business Review, the New York Times and Washington Post among many other publications. Johann, who shared his work at Tedx in London and with leading universities all over the world.

In this week’s podcast, we explore why we need to create spaces for recovery breaks in our work days, and how we can find ways to fit these moments into even the most demanding of roles and workplaces.

Connect with Johann Berlin: 

You’ll Learn:

  • [03:23] - Johann explains why making space for recovery can be so challenging in our workplaces.
  • [07:16] - Johann provides some examples of how workplaces are making recovery breaks a social norm to help people look after their wellbeing.
  • [11:37] - Johann offers some tips for tuning into the somatic, emotional, and neurological signals of your brain and body when you’re struggling, and how to create rituals and habits to help you recover in these moments.
  • [23:02] - Johann completes the Lightning Round.

Your Resources:

 

Thanks for listening! 

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.

Please leave an honest review of the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.  And don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

You can also listen to all the episodes of Making Positive Psychology Work streamed directly to your smartphone or iPad through stitcher. No need for downloading or syncing.

Until next time, take care!  Thank you Johann!

May 31, 2019

David Bright is a professor of organizational behavior and organizational development, and Chair of the Department of Management and International Business at Wright State University in Dayton, Ohio. An award-winning teacher with over 20 years of experience as a professional facilitator and executive coach, with expertise in organizational development, strategic planning, and change management, David is the co-author of Becoming a Master Manager, a textbook that features a values-based approach to leadership development.

In this episode, we explore how the state of an organization - dysfunctional to extraordinary -  impacts whether focusing on strengths or fixing weaknesses will be the best way to create positive changes, and how an appreciative lens can help the find the possibilities in any problems.

Connect with David Bright: 

You’ll Learn:

  • [02:27] - David explains how the Competing Values Management framework can help leaders and organization positively navigate the many paradoxes workplaces face today.
  • [08:16] - David shares how he has been practically applying the competing values framework as a leader during his university’s strategic planning process.
  • [13:53] - David outline why cynical conversations can provide positive experiences and outcomes in change processes and how to harness this energy.
  • [18:13] - David explains why it's important to assess the current state of a workplace – whether it leans towards dysfunction or extraordinary functioning – before deciding if a generative conversation or appreciative inquiry approach will be the best way to create positive changes.
  • [26:11] - David completes the Lightning Round.

Your Resources:

 

Thanks for listening! 

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.

Please leave an honest review of the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.  And don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

You can also listen to all the episodes of Making Positive Psychology Work streamed directly to your smartphone or iPad through stitcher. No need for downloading or syncing.

Until next time, take care!  Thank you David!

May 24, 2019

Thea O'Connor is a senior workplace wellbeing advisor, presenter, journalist, and coach. Thea has more than 20 years experience in the health sector, including her background as a dietitian and workplace health consultant, she is the founder of Nap Now and a committed nap-tivist.

In this week’s episode, Thea O’Connor explains why we need to raise people’s levels of body intelligence at work and the simple steps workplaces can take to help workers connect, listen, and respond to their bodies wellbeing needs as they go about their jobs.

Connect with Thea O'Connor: 

You’ll Learn:

  • [02:01] - Thea explains why improving people’s levels of body intelligence is an essential step for maintaining our wellbeing at work.
  • [04:52] - Thea provides some tips on how we can connect, listen, and respond better at work to what our bodies need to maintain our levels of energy.
  • [08:02] - Thea helps us to understand the importance of having a wellbeing rhythm in our days.
  • [09:45] - Thea explains the difference between our bodies circadian rhythm and ultradian rhythm and how we can manage these at work.
  • [12:21] - Thea shares the latest research on how chronotypes (body clocks) can influence people’s wellbeing and productivity at work.
  • [15:14] - Thea shares some examples of how teams can help look after each other’s physical wellbeing at work.
  • [17:23] - Thea explains how multitasking can undermine our wellbeing and performance at work and how we can break this bad habit.
  • [19:53] - Thea shares why she believes nap breaks should be the new coffee breaks in workplaces and how we can implement this practically.
  • [24:17] - Thea completes the Lightning Round.

Your Resources:

Thanks for listening! 

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.

Please leave an honest review of the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.  And don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

You can also listen to all the episodes of Making Positive Psychology Work streamed directly to your smartphone or iPad through stitcher. No need for downloading or syncing.

Until next time, take care!  Thank you Thea!

May 17, 2019

Dr. Toni Noble who is an adjunct professor in the Institute for positive psychology and education at the Australian Catholic University and is widely known in education as the coauthor of the multiple award-winning positive education programme, Bounce Back. Toni's government projects include the national safe schools' framework, the scoping study on student wellbeing and resourcing the student wellbeing hub. And she's worked with an international expert group in Bhutan to develop a new paradigm for the United Nations to promote wellbeing and happiness as a global goal.

In this week’s episode, Dr. Toni Noble explains why perfectionism and loneliness are rising in our schools and workplaces and what we can do practically to help people navigate these challenges to their wellbeing.

Connect with Dr. Toni Noble: 

You’ll Learn:

  • [02:19] - Toni explains why the rise of perfectionism is an issue workplaces need to be mindful of when it comes to improving people’s wellbeing
  • [07:30] - Toni shares why dealing with perfectionism takes more than just practicing a growth mindset
  • [10:09] - Toni explains why self-compassion is such an important skill to develop when it comes to taming perfectionism
  • [13:37] - Toni outlines why loneliness is also becoming a growing issue in workplaces and what we can do practically to improve people’s relationships at work
  • [21:35] - Toni completes the Lightning Round.

Your Resources:

Thanks for listening! 

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.

Please leave an honest review of the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.  And don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

You can also listen to all the episodes of Making Positive Psychology Work streamed directly to your smartphone or iPad through stitcher. No need for downloading or syncing.

Until next time, take care!  Thank you Toni!

May 10, 2019

Elise Morris, who is a disruptor of conventional leadership and people management practices and co-founder of the Strengths Lab. With more than 25 years of global and local human resources experience in corporate and public sector organizations and a masters of applied positive psychology, Elise's diverse background allows her to straddle the commercial realities of organizations while forming deep human connections to facilitate positive change and extraordinary outcomes.

In this week’s episode, Elise Morris explains how a strengths-focus can be infused across people management processes in workplaces.

Connect with Elise Morris: 

You’ll Learn:

  • [02:28] - Elise explains why strengths interventions in workplaces need to be more focused on how teams and organizations can support the development of people’s strengths.
  • [04:01] - Elise shares how the employee lifecycle or employee experience can be used to infuse a strengths focus throughout a workplace.
  • [05:40] - Elise offers some practical tips for strengths focused recruiting, from job descriptions to job advertisements, and job interviews.
  • [07:21] - Elise explains why she doesn’t generally recommend using strengths assessment surveys during the recruitment process.
  • [08:33] - Elise shares why the onboarding experience is a critical opportunity to help people embrace a strengths focus as they join a workplace.
  • [10:32] - Elise explains why it’s important that we are willing to be vulnerable with each other about our strengths and we experiment and learn how to use them more intelligently.
  • [11:28] - Elise offers some advice on how to address weaknesses in strengths focused workplaces.
  • [14:39] - Elise explains how leaders can have more meaningful strengths conversations with their people and provide some simple questions any leader can use.
  • [18:20] - Elise shares the steps workplaces can take to help develop people’s strengths as they go about their work.
  • [23:30] - Elise offers some ideas for how workplaces can be more strengths focused when people are leaving their organization and why this is worth the effort.
  • [25:44] - Elise completes the Lightning Round.

Your Resources:

Thanks for listening! 

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.

Please leave an honest review of the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.  And don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

You can also listen to all the episodes of Making Positive Psychology Work streamed directly to your smartphone or iPad through stitcher. No need for downloading or syncing.

Until next time, take care!  Thank you Elise!

May 3, 2019

Ashley Goodall is a senior executive, talent expert, and author who spent his career exploring large organizations from the inside. Ashley currently serves as the Senior Vice President of Leadership and Team Intelligence at Cisco, a new organization that is built to focus entirely on serving teams and team leaders. He is also the coauthor with Marcus Buckingham of the wonderful new book Nine Lies About Work: A Free Thinking Leader's Guide to the Real World, and they've recently published two cover stories in the Harvard Business Review, The Feedback Fallacy and Reinventing Performance Management.

In today's episode, Ashley Goodall shares the common mistakes most workplaces make when it comes to giving people feedback and the simple steps leaders and workplaces can take to build strengths-focused teams.

Connect with Ashley Goodall: 

You’ll Learn:

  • [02:18] - Ashley explains what his research with Marcus Buckingham found were the defining characteristics of the best teams at Deloitte’s
  • [03:54] - Ashley shares how he applied these insights to build a new organization at Cisco focused on serving teams and team leaders
  • [07:10] - Ashley offers tips for helping teach team leaders how to develop their own strengths and their people’s strengths
  • [08:53] - Ashley explains why leaders are rarely reliable raters of their people’s performance and what they can do instead.
  • [11:00] - Ashley provides an example of what a strengths-based conversation might sound like between a leader and a team member
  • [15:00] - Ashley explains how leaders can still address people’s weaknesses and areas for improvement whilst still being strengths-focused
  • [16:48] - Ashley shares why the approach most people take to developing people’s potential at work is a lie.
  • [20:25] - Ashley provides suggestions for leaders who may have employees who are disengaged and have no interest in developing their strengths
  • [22:49] - Ashley offers advice to help align people’s strengths to their work, even when the opportunities are challenging.
  • [25:28] - Ashley completes the Lightning Round.

Your Resources:

Thanks for listening! 

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.

Please leave an honest review of the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.  And don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

You can also listen to all the episodes of Making Positive Psychology Work streamed directly to your smartphone or iPad through stitcher. No need for downloading or syncing.

Until next time, take care!  Thank you Ashley!

Apr 26, 2019

Dr. Jillian Darwish currently serves as President and CEO of Mayerson Academy, a non-profit dedicated to transforming individuals, teams, and organizational performance. Under her leadership, the Academy has become the exclusive education partner to the VIA Institute, working with schools, universities, organizations, and communities to utilize the science of character strengths to transform cultures. The Academy’s work has been featured in EdWeek, Live Happy, and US News and World Report and Dr. Darwish has been invited to share the Academy’s work around the globe, including presentations in China, New Zealand, Mexico, Canada, and Hong Kong.

In today’s episode, Dr. Jillian Darwish shares the surprising findings of a recent study with 1,000 American workers about if, how, and why people are using their strengths each day at work and the practical steps many workplaces may be missing.

Connect with Jillian Darwish: 

You’ll Learn:

  • [01:45] - Jillian shares what a recent study of 1,000 people representative of the American workforce has discovered about if, when, and why people use their strengths – the things they good at and enjoy doing – at work each day.
  • [05:41] - Jillian explains why workers may feel that their workplaces are less committed to developing their strengths.
  • [09:57] - Jillian outlines why having psychological safety in our teams, leaders who are able to have meaningful strengths conversations, and organizations who are committed to building our strengths is so important.
  • [11:40] - Jillian offers some tips for helping more leaders have the willingness and confidence to have meaningful strengths conversations with their workers.
  • [13:38] - Jillian shares the three important steps workplaces can use to help their people use their strengths each day at work.
  • [15:55] - Jillian offers an important caution for workplaces trying to activate people’s strengths.
  • [22:41] - Jillian completes the Lightning Round.

Your Resources:

Thanks for listening! 

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.

Please leave an honest review of the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.  And don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

You can also listen to all the episodes of Making Positive Psychology Work streamed directly to your smartphone or iPad through stitcher. No need for downloading or syncing.

Until next time, take care!  Thank you Jillian!

Apr 12, 2019

Dr. Margaret Heffernan is an entrepreneur who mentors CEOs and senior executives of major global organizations and is lead faculty for the Forward Institute’s responsible leadership programme. She is the author of five books including Willful Blindness which was named one of the most important business books of the decade by the Financial Times, and in 2015 she was awarded the transmission prize for her book A Bigger Prize. Margaret’s Ted talks have been seen by over seven million people.

In today’s episode, Dr. Margaret Heffernan shares what researchers have learned about the impact competition has on our performance and wellbeing, and gives us some practical tips on building psychological safety in our organizations

Connect with Margaret Heffernan: 

You’ll Learn:

  • [01:45] - Margaret explains what research William Muir discovered about how competition impacts productivity and why every leader needs to be mindful of this research in workplaces
  • [05:41] - Margaret explains why leaders may remain willfully blind to the cost on performance and wellbeing of fiercely competitive environments in workplaces
  • [09:57] - Margaret explains how willful blindness is driven by our theories of the world and how this impacts our ability to take in data that challenges our ideas
  • [11:40] - Margaret offers some tips for nudging leaders out of their willful blindness so they can appreciate the importance of their people’s wellbeing
  • [13:38] - Margaret shares why and how institutionalizing dissent in workplaces can help to lower levels of willful blindness for ourselves and others
  • [15:55] - Margaret explains how we can improve our ability in workplaces for “scrapping” as we learn to navigate conflict in healthy ways with each other
  • [19:24] - Margret offers some tips for improving social capital in busy workplaces and the impact it can have on the bottom line in workplaces
  • [22:41] - Margaret completes the Lightning round.

Your Resources:

Thanks for listening! 

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.

Please leave an honest review of the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.  And don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

You can also listen to all the episodes of Making Positive Psychology Work streamed directly to your smartphone or iPad through stitcher. No need for downloading or syncing.

Until next time, take care!  Thank you Margaret!

Apr 4, 2019

As Professor Emerita of Management at California State University East Bay, Loretta's research explores how people can discover their power over their mammalian operating system(laughs). The author of several books, including her newest one Tame Your Anxiety which is being released shortly, she has shared her research and talks all over the world

In today’s episode, we explore, how we can tame the anxiety our mammalian brains when facing challenges at work.

Connect with Loretta Breuning: 

You’ll Learn:

  • [02:15] - Loretta explains how anxiety can impact us neurologically at work when we’re facing challenges.
  • [05:13] - Loretta explores why we might have become too anxious about being anxious at work.
  • [06:43] - Loretta outlines how rewards can create a treadmill system for behaviors that can make us feel more anxious at work.
  • [09:39] - Loretta explains how we can prepare ourselves to better navigate our feelings of anxiety at work.
  • [14:31] - Loretta shares a tool she has created to encrypt self-soothing to help manage the anxiety that can come with learning in workplaces.
  • [16:50] - Loretta offers some simple suggestions to help others tame their anxiety at work.
  • [21:25] - Loretta outlines some of the pitfalls for taming anxiety in workplaces.
  • [225:30] - Loretta completes the Lightning round.

Your Resources:

Thanks for listening! 

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.

Please leave an honest review of the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.  And don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

You can also listen to all the episodes of Making Positive Psychology Work streamed directly to your smartphone or iPad through stitcher. No need for downloading or syncing.

Until next time, take care!  Thank you Lorettaa!

Mar 28, 2019

Today we're talking to Wayne Baker, who's a professor of business administration at the University of Michigan Ross School of Business, and faculty director of the Centre for Positive Organisations. Wayne's teaching and research focuses on social capital, social networks, generosity, positive organizational scholarship, and values. And his latest book is Permission to Ask, which is coming out in 2020. He's also a founder and board member of Give and Take Inc., developers of the Givitas collaborative technology platform.

In this week’s episode, we explore how individual and organizational levels of energy impact our performance and wellbeing, and the small steps we can take to boost, maintain, and our renew our energy levels at work.

Connect with Wayne Baker: 

You’ll Learn:

  • [03:06] - Wayne explains how emotional energy, relational energy, and organizational energy can impact our wellbeing and performance at work.
  • [06:41] - Wayne shares what he and other researchers are finding about the benefits of intentionally managing our emotional, relational, and organization energy in workplaces.
  • [08:34] - Wayne provides some examples of how workplaces are intentionally creating strategies to manage people’s energy at work.
  • [11:26] - Wayne explains how we can help people understand that unlike machines our energy ebbs and flows during a day, and the small things they can do to maintain higher levels of energy.
  • [13:53] - Wayne outlines how psychological safety and the willingness to ask for help shape the levels of organizational energy a workplace experiences.
  • [17:44] - Wayne shares why leaders often find looking after the energy of their organization so challenging.
  • [19:36] - Wayne offers for some tips for leaders to embed behaviors that help people to renew and sustain their energy in their workplaces.
  • [22:09] - Wayne explains how we can maintain our energy wisely, so we avoid burning ourselves or others out at work.
  • [23:06] - Wayne completes the Lightning round.

Your Resources:

Thanks for listening! 

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.

Please leave an honest review of the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.  And don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

You can also listen to all the episodes of Making Positive Psychology Work streamed directly to your smartphone or iPad through stitcher. No need for downloading or syncing.

Until next time, take care!  Thank you Wayne!

Mar 21, 2019

Today we're talking to Michelle Etheve, who specializes in enabling people to create purposeful, strength-based change. With a Master's of Science in Coaching Psychology from the University of Sydney, post-graduate studies in Positive Psychology and Education, and experience utilising human centred design and appreciative inquiry, Michelle is sought around the world for her ability to create and deliver highly engaging learning and positive change experiences that enable people and teams to thrive.

In this episode, we explore how you can create more positive changes in your workplace by creating a coaching culture that supports continuous learning. We also explore where and why organizational changes often come unstuck.

Connect with Michelle Etheve: 

You’ll Learn:

  • [02:26] - Michelle explains how new research has found that organizational approaches to change can improve people’s wellbeing and create a virtuous cycle
  • [04:01] - Michelle provides a practical example of how one company is fusing wellbeing and changes approaches together as they deliver business outcomes
  • [08:09] - Michelle offers some tips for leaders to have more inclusive and meaningful conversations that invite people to take ownership of the changes that need to be created
  • [12:12] - Michelle shares some simple questions to help us support continuous learning as changes are implemented in our workplaces
  • [17:20] - Michelle shares an antidote to the “I’m too busy” stories that often bring change unstuck in workplaces
  • [18:46] - Michelle completes the Lightning round.

Your Resources:

Thanks for listening! 

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.

Please leave an honest review for the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.  And don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

You can also listen to all the episodes of Making Positive Psychology Work streamed directly to your smartphone or iPad through stitcher. No need for downloading or syncing.

Until next time, take care!  Thank you Michelle!

Mar 14, 2019

Today we're talking to Jon Berghoff, who is the co-founder and managing partner of the Flourishing Leadership Institute, and has designed and facilitated whole system change efforts through large group collaborative summits for the U.S. Navy, the United Nations, BMW and businesses and institutions of all sizes. Known for bringing out the "group genius" in high stakes, complex environments, with speed, ease, and playfulness, Jon is sought around the world for his ability to create powerful learning experiences around Appreciative Leadership, Emotionally Intelligent Negotiations, and Influence.

In this episode, Jon shares the insights from the new Change Lab 2019 Workplace Survey including why the quantity of change is not the real challenge workplaces face when it comes to supporting people's wellbeing.

Connect with Jon Berghoff: 

You’ll Learn:

  • [02:42] - Jon shares what The Change Lab 2019 Workplace Survey found when it comes to creating successful changes that support people’s wellbeing at work
  • [05:18] - Jon outlines why it is the quality of change experiences, not the quantity of change experiences that are burning people out in workplaces
  • [08:58] - Jon shares why having a clear organizational purpose has such an impact on creating successful changes in workplaces
  • [11:28] - Jon shares the three questions any workplace can use to help make changes more personally meaningful for workers
  • [14:07] - Jon outlines the six strengths-focused questions that workplaces can ask to make change more successful
  • [19:05] - Jon explains why 40% of workers might still believe that fixing weaknesses in their workplace is the best way to create successful changes
  • [20:56] - Jon shares how organizations can use an invite-and-inquire approach to creating change to drive more ownership and accountability for action
  • [24:56] - Jon outlines how the virtuous cycle between successful change and wellbeing in workplaces works and what we can do to harness it
  • [28:56] - Jon completes the Lightning round.

Your Resources:

Thanks for listening! 

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.

Please leave an honest review for the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.  And don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

You can also listen to all the episodes of Making Positive Psychology Work streamed directly to your smartphone or iPad through stitcher. No need for downloading or syncing.

Until next time, take care!  Thank you Jon!

Mar 7, 2019

Today we're talking to Ron Fry, who's a professor of organizational behavior at the Weatherhead School of Management, Case Western Reserve University and former chairman of the Department of Organizational Behaviour, which has been consistently ranked one of the best in the world by the Financial Times.


With 11 books and over 45 articles and chapters, Ron is widely published in the areas of organizational development, appreciative inquiry, team building, change management, executive development, and the role and function of the CEO. He's a co-creator of the appreciative inquiry theory and method and continues to both apply and study the applications of AI in organizations all over the world.

In this episode, we discuss the simple questions that leaders can ask to help their people not just survive, but thrive, through organizational change experiences.

Connect with Ronald Fry: 

https://weatherhead.case.edu/faculty/ronald-fry

You’ll Learn:

  • [02:03] - Ron explains the three most important evidence-based insights every leader should know in order to implement change effectively in their workplace.
  • [04:57] - Ron shares why the questions we ask as leaders set changes in motion and how we can be more intentional about the questions we choose.
  • [09:14] - Ron outlines how creating opportunities to build new connections inside and outside of our organizations can power our change efforts.
  • [12:38] -  Ron explains how Appreciative Inquiry can build rapid trust in workplaces to help people work together to make their hopes for a change a reality.
  • [17:39] -  Ron outlines why stability and change have an interconnected and interdependent relationship, and why stability is as important for our success as change is in workplaces.
  • [24:07] -  Ron challenges our language about change in workplaces, and provides insights on why we need to think of change as a verb.
  • [27:23] -  Ron shares his tips for helping people to flourish through change in workplaces.
  • [31:18] -  Ron explains what it takes to build a positive institution and if this is possible in any workplace.
  • [32:07] - Ron completes the Lightning round.

Your Resources:

Thanks for listening! 

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.

Please leave an honest review for the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.  And don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

You can also listen to all the episodes of Making Positive Psychology Work streamed directly to your smartphone or iPad through stitcher. No need for downloading or syncing.

Until next time, take care!  Thank you Ron!

Mar 1, 2019

Today we're talking to Marie McLeod who fuses her qualifications in social work, adult education, and positive pschology with her extensive experience in community culture change. As the director of PoPsy, Marie makes positive psychology practical for individuals, organizations, and families, and as the founder of The Kindness Company, she uses kindness and compassion to cultivate community level wellbeing.

In this episode, we explore why and how community-level kindness can be an active ingredient to improve wellbeing to workplaces and the frameworks and practical steps we can take to make this a reality. 

Connect with Marie McLeod: 

You’ll Learn:

  • [03:07] - Marie explains why we need to think about improving people’s wellbeing, at an individual and at the community level in workplaces.
  • [06:40] - Marie shares how she’s been using the Community Kindness Challenge to help wellbeing be taught and caught in workplaces at the levels of me, we, and us.
  • [12:01] - Marie outlines why she’s finding kindness is the superpower of wellbeing approaches.
  • [16:10] -  Marie outlines the BEACON framework for improving wellbeing at a community level and explains how this build shared accountability for the wellbeing actions people choose to take.
  • [21:09] -  Marie offers some practical tips for improving kindness in workplaces.
  • [24:43] - Marie completes the Lightning round.

Your Resources:

Thanks for listening! 

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.

Please leave an honest review for the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.  And don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

You can also listen to all the episodes of Making Positive Psychology Work streamed directly to your smartphone or iPad through stitcher. No need for downloading or syncing.

Until next time, take care!  Thank you Marie!

Feb 21, 2019

Today we're talking to David Zeitler who uses the latest research in neuroscience, adult development, and leadership development to help people find ways to embrace the process of change and create transformations for themselves and others. After beginning as a psychotherapist and later spending two years as a lay monk, David went on to train executives and life coaches in the Immunity for Change Coaching Program at Mind Works with Harvard Professor Lisa Lahey and Robert Kegan.

In this episode, we explore why we might be immune to creating the changes we want for ourselves and our teams in workplaces and how a simple mapping exercise can help us overcome our resistance to change.

Connect with David Zeitler: 

You’ll Learn:

  • [02:25] - David explains that our mind has its own immune system that impacts our ability to create changes in our lives
  • [04:51] - David outlines the three plateaus in adult mental development that help us navigate work and life
  • [11:17] - David offers some tips for different ways to approach technical challenges and adaptive challenges when it comes to creating change
  • [14:19] -  David outlines how a psychological immunity map can be used to embrace adaptative challenges and make change a little easier
  • [19:47] -  David outlines some of the common worries that drain people’s commitment for change
  • [22:40] - David shares how behavior change experiments can help us test our worries and concerns about creating change
  • [27:58] - David completes the Lightning round.

Your Resources:

Thanks for listening! 

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.

Please leave an honest review for the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.  And don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

You can also listen to all the episodes of Making Positive Psychology Work streamed directly to your smartphone or iPad through stitcher. No need for downloading or syncing.

Until next time, take care!  Thank you David!

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