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Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast

If you believe as I do that by uncovering tested, practical ways to help people move from functioning to flourishing at work, we can better navigate the incredible challenges and opportunities our world faces, then this podcast is for you. My goal each week is to give you access to the world’ leading positive psychology, positive organizational scholarship and neuroscience researchers and practitioners to explore their latest research findings on how you can improve wellbeing, develop strengths, nurture positive relationships, make work meaningful and cultivate the grit to accomplish what matters most. If you want evidence-based approaches to bringing out the best in yourself and others at work, then consider this podcast your step-by-step guide.
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Dec 5, 2019

My guest today is David Cooperrider, renowned for his research in appreciative inquiry, a strength-based approach to creating change.

In this interview, you will hear how appreciative inquiry is being used to build a better world. David explains how organizations can align strengths in ways that make the system’s weaknesses irrelevant. He also shares how individuals and organizations can use this life-centric approach to go through the steps of his new P.O.S.I.T.I.V.E change model.

This interview was produced in partnership with the Canadian Positive Psychology Association and the 3rd Canadian Conference on Positive Psychology.

Tune in to hear more!

Connect with Wayne Baker: 

Website: www.davidcooperrider.com

Twitter: @Dlc6David

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You’ll Learn

  • [2:25] - David explains the basics of appreciative inquiry
  • [4:52] - What you and your organization can gain from this positive change approach
  • [5:27] - Rethinking our approach to change.
  • [7:05] - Step P - Positive re-framing
  • [9:30] - Step O - Omni search and bringing in all of the strengths at every level
  • [10:50] - Step S - Strengthen the strengths
  • [12:28] - Step I - Imagining our future
  • [14:40] - Steps T & I - Translate and improvise
  • [16:30] - Step V - Valuing progress moments
  • [18:02] - Step E - Embedding the change and reversing our mindset on change
  • [20:50] - The lightning round with David Cooperrider

Your Resources:

Thanks for listening! 

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.

Please leave an honest review of the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.  And don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

You can also listen to all the episodes of Making Positive Psychology Work streamed directly to your smartphone or iPad through stitcher. No need for downloading or syncing.

Until next time, take care!  Thank you David!

Nov 28, 2019

Dr. Wayne Baker is a professor of business administration and professor of management and organizations at the University of Michigan's Ross School of Business, and faculty director of the Centre for Positive Organizations. The author of the forthcoming book, 'All You Have to Do Is Ask', as well as five other books and many scholarly articles. Wayne's research focuses on social capital, social networks, generosity, and positive organizations. He's also the co-founder and board member of Give and Take, Inc. who are developers of collaboration technologies based on the principles in All You Have to Do Is Ask.

In this week’s podcast, we learn why being able to ask to help is one of the keys to workplace success, and the simple steps you can take to ask in ways that make it easy for people to say yes!

Connect with Wayne Baker: 

You’ll Learn:

  • [03:15] - Wayne explains why being a good giver-requester at work shapes our success and wellbeing in workplaces.
  • [04:29] - Wayne outlines how his research on giver-requesters intersects with the research of Professor Adam Grant on being successful self-protective givers.
  • [06:07] - Wayne shares what the research is finding on how gender influences our ability to ask for help at work.
  • [06:57] - Wayne offers insights on how age and power influence our ability to ask for help at work.
  • [08:39] - Wayne outlines how psychological safety in our workplaces influences our ability to ask for help at work and what we can do to improve this
  • [10:34] - Wayne outlines the SMART criteria to make it easier to ask for help at work and for people to say yes.
  • [13:12] - Wayne shares his free assessment tool to measure your ability to ask for help and shares the findings surfacing from this new research.
  • [14:54] - Wayne shares the barriers that make it difficult for most people to ask for help at work and how we can overcome these.
  • [18:01] - Wayne shares why researchers are finding that you should ask people more than once for help.
  • [19:06] - Wayne provides some plug and play routines that workplaces can use to help make asking for help easier.
  • [20:34] - Wayne shares how we can map the energy for asking and giving within our teams to measure what is unfolding.
  • [21:23] - Wayne explains how mini-games can be used to playfully incentivize a group to ask for help to solve a problem together.
  • [23:22] - Wayne offers some tips to help recruit and rewards leaders who are chief help seekers.
  • [24:50] - Wayne offers two cautions about asking for help at work.
  • [26:28] - Wayne completes the Lightning Round.

Your Resources:

Thanks for listening! 

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.

Please leave an honest review of the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.  And don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

You can also listen to all the episodes of Making Positive Psychology Work streamed directly to your smartphone or iPad through stitcher. No need for downloading or syncing.

Until next time, take care!  Thank you Wayne!

Nov 21, 2019

Stephen Carter is the founder of one of Australia's fastest-growing, privately-owned recruitment firms, Sharp and Carter, who have five offices and more than 120 staff around the country.

In this week’s podcast, we explore how putting people first by using positive leadership approaches has helped one workplace grow their revenue by 55% per annum for the last five years.

Connect with Stephen Carter: 

You’ll Learn:

  • [02:13] - Carts explains how putting people first has helped his organization grow 55% per annum for the past five years.
  • [04:35] - Carts shares why their leadership team felt confident to put people before profit.
  • [07:03] - Carts outlines how the shift to putting people first was explained to employees and what they did to overcome people’s cynicism about this approach.
  • [09:30] - Carts share the cultural pillars that emerged as a result of putting people first and how these are used to guide people’s day to day behaviors in the business.
  • [13:24] - Carts outlines how positive leadership practices have been scaled and embedded across their organization – even when trust gets broken.
  • [18:15] - Carts explains how they try to support people who are really struggling when it comes to their wellbeing at work.
  • [21:07] - Carts offers some tips for how leaders can look after their own wellbeing as they try to put people first in their organization.
  • [24:31] - Carts completes the Lightning Round.

Your Resources:

Thanks for listening! 

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.

Please leave an honest review of the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.  And don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

You can also listen to all the episodes of Making Positive Psychology Work streamed directly to your smartphone or iPad through stitcher. No need for downloading or syncing.

Until next time, take care!  Thank you Stephen!

Nov 14, 2019

Dr. BJ Fogg teaches good people how behavior works, so they can create products and services that benefit everyday people around the world. A behavioral scientist with deep experience in innovation and teaching, BJ runs a research lab at Stanford University, and trains innovators to use his work, so they can create solutions that influence behavior in health, financial well-being, learning, productivity, and more. He's personally coached over 40,000 people informing new habits using his breakthrough method called Tiny Habits. And, his forthcoming book Tiny Habits: The Small Changes That Change Everything is scheduled for publication in early 2020.

In this week's episode, we learn the simple recipe for creating tiny habits and how to deal with our motivation monkeys and surface the golden behaviors that improve our wellbeing.

Connect with BJ Fogg: 

You’ll Learn:

  • [02:39] - BJ explains why most of us find changing our behaviors challenging because we approach change in the wrong way.
  • [04:16] - BJ outlines the three variables his research has found that can make changing our behavior easier.
  • [08:17] - BJ explains why our motivations for changing our behavior is often unreliable and how we can tame our motivation monkeys.
  • [09:49] - BJ shares some tips on managing motivation conflicts and motivation waves when it comes to changing our behaviors.
  • [13:12] - BJ shares his tips for how we can surface golden behaviors to create more of the changes we’re wanting.
  • [15:43] - BJ helps us understand the important difference between our aspirations, our goals, and our behaviors when it comes to surfacing our golden behaviors.
  • [17:32] - BJ shares the recipe for turning golden behaviors into tiny habits.
  • [20:22] - BJ explains why we need to celebrate the completion of our habits and the role mood plays in helping us to create behavior changes.
  • [25:46] - BJ outlines how an ability chain model can help us troubleshoot our tiny habits when the changes we want to create become stuck.
  • [27:41] - BJ completes the Lightning Round.

Your Resources:

Thanks for listening! 

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.

Please leave an honest review of the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.  And don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

You can also listen to all the episodes of Making Positive Psychology Work streamed directly to your smartphone or iPad through stitcher. No need for downloading or syncing.

Until next time, take care!  Thank you BJ!

Nov 7, 2019

Dr. Timothy R. Clark is the founder and managing partner at LeadFactor and a highly sought after advisor, coach, and facilitator to CEOs and senior leadership teams around the world. He's the author of four books with his newest, The Four Stages of Psychological Safety due out in early 2020, and he's written more than 150 articles on leadership, change, strategy, human capital, culture, and employee engagement.

In this week’s podcast, we explore the four stages of psychological safety and how we can shape our wellbeing and performance at work.

Connect with Dr. Timothy R. Clark: 

http://leaderfactor.com/

You’ll Learn:

  • [02:19] - Tim explains what psychological safety is and why it recently became a hot topic of conversations in many workplaces when it comes to helping people thrive at work.
  • [03:44] - Tim shares some of the research-based findings on the potential benefits for leaders who invest in psychological safety.
  • [07:16] - Tim explains why improving diversity and inclusion successfully depends on also heightening psychological safety.
  • [09:39] - Tim explains what studies are finding out about the link between psychological safety and people’s levels of wellbeing at work.
  • [11:31] - Tim offers two practical recommendations based on what researchers are finding right now can help to improve psychological safety in workplaces.
  • [15:30] - Tim outlines the four stages of psychological safety that can help organizations understand where they’re people are at practically and how it can be heightened.
  • [21:24] -Tim challenges us to think about when leaders push the fear buttons in workplaces and what impact does this have on psychological safety for ourselves and others.
  • [24:56] - Tim completes the Lightning Round.

Your Resources:

Thanks for listening! 

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.

Please leave an honest review of the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.  And don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

You can also listen to all the episodes of Making Positive Psychology Work streamed directly to your smartphone or iPad through stitcher. No need for downloading or syncing.

Until next time, take care!  Thank you Tim!

Oct 31, 2019

Tom Rath is an author and researcher who has spent the past two decades studying how work can improve human health and wellbeing. His ten books including, "Strengths Finder 2.0", "Wellbeing", and "Eat Move Sleep", have sold more than ten million copies, and made hundreds of appearances on global bestseller lists. During his 13 years at Gallup, Tom was the Program Leader for the development of Clifton Strengths Finder, which has helped over 20 million people to uncover their talents, and went on to lead the organization’s employee engagement, wellbeing, and leadership practices worldwide. He has served for the past five years as a Gallup Senior Scientist. And he's also an advisor, investor, and partner in several start-ups.

In this podcast, we explore how small changes in the way you eat, move and sleep can improve your wellbeing and performance at work.

Connect with Tom Rath: 

You’ll Learn:

  • [04:29] - Tom explains how the small choices around how we eat, move and sleep each day can have a big impact on our wellbeing and performance at work.
  • [08:16] - Tom outlines why tackling the way we eat, move, and sleep simultaneously is a better way to improve our energy levels.
  • [11:38] - Tom offers some small choices that can improve the way we’re eating each day.
  • [15:44] - Tom provides some tips to help leaders improve the way people eat at work together.
  • [18:18] - Tom explains why sitting is our biggest health challenge at work and the easy ways we can get people moving more at work.
  • [21:35] - Tom explains why lack of sleep is the most underestimated threat to our wellbeing and performance at work.
  • [25:17] - Tom completes the Lightning Round.

Your Resources:

Thanks for listening! 

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.

Please leave an honest review of the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.  And don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

You can also listen to all the episodes of Making Positive Psychology Work streamed directly to your smartphone or iPad through stitcher. No need for downloading or syncing.

Until next time, take care!  Thank you Tom!

Oct 24, 2019

Jane Dutton is a Professor Emerita of Business Administration and Psychology at the University of Michigan. Jane's research focuses on how organizational conditions enable human thriving, and in particular, how the quality of connection between people at work affects individual and organizational flourishing. Her research explores compassion in organizations, resilience in organizations, as well as energy in organizations, and she's published over 100 articles and book chapters, edited 12 books, and written a book for managers called Energise Your Workplace: How To Build And Sustain High-Quality Connections At Work. In 2012, Jane was awarded the Scholarly Contributions in Management Award for the Academy of Management, which is a lifetime achievement award.

In this week’s podcast, we explore the value of creating high-quality connections with people at work and the simple steps you can take to authentically connect with anyone – even your most challenging colleagues.

Connect with Jane Dutton: 

You’ll Learn:

  • [02:23] - Jane defines what creates a high-quality connection for us at work.
  • [04:43] - Jane explains the difference between high-quality connections and Professor Barbara Fredrickson’s micro-moments of connections.
  • [06:37] - Jane outlines the benefits of prioritizing high-quality connections when it comes to our wellbeing and performance at work.
  • [10:11] - Jane shares what her latest research is finding out about the ability of high-quality connections to improve psychological safety in teams.
  • [11:58] - Jane offers some tips on how high-quality connections can help ease the rising rates of loneliness in workplaces.
  • [14:33] - Jane explains how leaders can create cultures that prioritize high-quality connections among their workers.
  • [17:33] - Jane offers some simple suggestions for convincing leaders of the need to prioritize high-quality connections in our workplaces.
  • [21:32] - Jane offers some practical suggestions for us to create more high-quality connections in our relationships at work.
  • [25:11] - Jane shares what her research is finding can help us manage our corrosive connections and more challenging relationships at work.
  • [30:04] - Jane completes the Lightning Round.

Your Resources:

Thanks for listening! 

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.

Please leave an honest review of the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.  And don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

You can also listen to all the episodes of Making Positive Psychology Work streamed directly to your smartphone or iPad through stitcher. No need for downloading or syncing.

Until next time, take care!  Thank you Jane!

Oct 17, 2019

Dr. Steven Rogelberg is an organizational psychologist who holds the title of Chancellor's Professor at UNC Charlotte for distinguished national, international and interdisciplinary contributions. He's an award-winning teacher and recipient of the very prestigious Humboldt Award for his research with over 100 publications, addressing issues such as team effectiveness, leadership, engagement, health and employee wellbeing, meetings at work and organizational research methods. His latest book, The Surprising Science of Meetings: How You Can Lead Your Team to Peak Performance, was recognized by the Washington Post as the number one leadership book to watch for in 2019 and has been featured in media outlets around the world

In this week’s podcast, we explore the simple steps you can take to run more positive and productive meetings at work.

Connect with Steven Rogelberg: 

You’ll Learn:

  • [02:27] - Steven explains how workplace meetings offer opportunities to improve our individual and collective wellbeing.
  • [03:22] - Steven outlines what his research is finding out about the best meetings in workplaces.
  • [05:13] - Steven outlines why so many workplaces meetings struggle to bring out the best in people.
  • [06:44] - Steven explains how we can design meetings in ways that allow us and others to be more effective givers at work.
  • [08:57] - Steven outlines why planning your meetings to create a little stress can be beneficial for all participants.
  • [10:22] - Steven shares what his research has found about the ideal length of our meetings.
  • [11:31] - Steven offers some practical tips on how many people to invite to a meeting.
  • [14:14] - Steven explains why meetings leaders need to be mindful of the mood of their meetings and how can they shape this practically.
  • [17:44] - Steven explains how silence can be used to improve our meetings.
  • [19:21] - Steven offers some tips for team members to improve meetings.
  • [20:42] - Steven explains how we can make virtual meetings more productive and supportive of our wellbeing.
  • [23:36] - Steven completes the Lightning Round.

Your Resources:

Thanks for listening! 

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.

Please leave an honest review of the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.  And don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

You can also listen to all the episodes of Making Positive Psychology Work streamed directly to your smartphone or iPad through stitcher. No need for downloading or syncing.

Until next time, take care!  Thank you Steven!

Oct 10, 2019

Alissa Daire Nelson is a certified strength strategy coach who gives people the tools and guidance to put their strengths to work. She's the host of the Maximize Your Strengths podcast, and author of From Frustrated To Frickin' Awesome: 4 Steps to Achieve the Success You're Wired For. Alissa's work has been featured in media outlets all over the world.

In this week’s episode, we explore the practical steps we can take to spot and develop people’s strengths – the things we’re good at and enjoy doing – using tools like Clifton Strengths in workplaces.

Connect with Alissa Nelson: 

You’ll Learn:

  • [02:13] - Alissa explains why people’s strengths can help us quickly strengthen our relationship at work.
  • [04:49] - Alissa explains how tools like Clifton Strengths can give us a language to spot and understand the strengths in each other.
  • [08:04] - Alissa explains how we can use the talents that tools like Clifton Strengths surface for us as we go about our jobs to improve our performance and wellbeing at work.
  • [11:06] - Alissa explains why it's helpful to understand the contributions our strengths can make and the needs we each have to support our strengths at work.
  • [14:11] - Alissa explains how we can become aware and manage the triggers that occur when our strengths are overlooked or undervalued by others we work with.
  • [19:37] - Alissa offers some tips to help us get better at noticing how we can develop our strengths more effectively at work.
  • [22:36] - Alissa offers tips for leaders to help develop their people’s strengths more at work.
  • [26:37] - Alissa completes the Lightning Round.

Your Resources:

Thanks for listening! 

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.

Please leave an honest review of the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.  And don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

You can also listen to all the episodes of Making Positive Psychology Work streamed directly to your smartphone or iPad through stitcher. No need for downloading or syncing.

Until next time, take care!  Thank you Alissa!

Oct 4, 2019

Wendy Wood is a professor at the University of Southern California and visiting faculty at Insead Business school in France. Wendy has spent the last 30 years studying people's habits and understanding how to change them, and her research has been featured in media publications all over the world and is the focus of her forthcoming book Good Habits, Bad Habits.

In this week’s episode, we explore what the latest research is finding out about how we can create and sustain good habits to support our wellbeing.

Connect with Wendy Wood: 

You’ll Learn:

  • [02:38] - Wendy explains why creating good habits can be challenging for many of us.
  • [04:27] - Wendy shares what her research is finding about how we can develop good habits.
  • [06:22] - Wendy shares why her research has found that it doesn’t take 21 days to build a habit.
  • [08:40] - Wendy explains why thinking about the context for the habits we want to create is so important and offers some tips to make it easier to activate the habits we want to build.
  • [11:24] - Wendy explains the power of repetition when it comes to building the habits we most want.
  • [13:09] - Wendy outlines the role rewards play in creating our habits and what kind of rewards work best.
  • [16:13] - Wendy offers some tips for aligning our goals and our habits to make them easier to sustain.
  • [17:28] - Wendy explains the surprising finding in her research on the impact our habits have on our levels of self-control.
  • [19:47] - Wendy helps us understand how stacking or swapping habits can make it easier to create changes in our behavior.
  • [22:26] - Wendy offers some cautions and caveats for building good habits in ways that are good for you and others.
  • [24:29] - Wendy offers tips for breaking bad habits like constantly checking our mobile phones.
  • [27:20] - Wendy shares why she believes friction is important for our habits.
  • [28:24] - Wendy completes the Lightning Round.

Your Resources:

Thanks for listening! 

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.

Please leave an honest review of the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.  And don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

You can also listen to all the episodes of Making Positive Psychology Work streamed directly to your smartphone or iPad through stitcher. No need for downloading or syncing.

Until next time, take care!  Thank you Wendy!

Sep 27, 2019

Cy Wakeman is a drama researcher, global thought leader, and New York Times bestselling author, recognized for cultivating a counter-intuitive, reality-based approach to leadership. Cy has helped companies such as Google, Facebook, NASA, and many others to navigate our rapidly changing world, using good mental processes to harness energy wasted in workplace drama, and reinvest that effort into achieving profound business results. Her work has been featured in several media outlets around the world. The author of several books, her latest is No Ego: How to Cut the Cost of Drama and Entitlement, and Drive Big Results.

In this week’s episode, we explore at why most of us waste 2.5 hours a day on average in emotional workplaces dramas and the simple steps we can take to ditch the drama, improve our wellbeing and save ourselves time, energy, and money.

Connect with Cy Wakeman: 

You’ll Learn:

  • [02:36] - Cy explains why workplaces lose billions of dollars every year due to the emotional waste of employees.
  • [03:29] - Cy outlines what her research has found drives drama in workplaces.
  • [05:23] - Cy shares why most of us lose 2.5 hours a day in unnecessary dramas at work.
  • [08:07] - Cy provides some questions leaders can use to help their people ditch the drama.
  • [14:23] - Cy shares why leaders can find it hard to ditch the drama in workplaces.
  • [15:54] - Cy outlines why a lack of accountability drives drama in many workplaces and how this can be addressed.
  • [20:24] - Cy shares why fostering engagement without accountability often leads to entitlement in workplaces.
  • [24:29] - Cy shares her insights on why change management should die as an organizational practice in order to minimize drama in workplaces.
  • [27:27] - Cy explores how managing our emotional waste better can improve psychological safety in workplaces.
  • [29:52] - Cy explains why it’s not enough for employees to just manage their own emotional waste, but why leaders and organizations need to support these behaviours.
  • [31:26] - Cy completes the Lightning Round.

Your Resources:

Thanks for listening! 

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.

Please leave an honest review of the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.  And don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

You can also listen to all the episodes of Making Positive Psychology Work streamed directly to your smartphone or iPad through stitcher. No need for downloading or syncing.

Until next time, take care!  Thank you Cy!

Sep 20, 2019

Rachael Powell is the Chief Customer, People and Marketing Officer at Xero, a cloud-based accounting platform for small and medium businesses around the world. She's an experienced business executive with a demonstrated success across strategy, marketing, and human resources. Rachael has a Masters in Applied Positive Psychology from the University of Melbourne and is passionate about enabling people to do the best work of their lives.

In this week’s episode, we explore how Xero, a cloud-based accounting platform for small and medium businesses around the world, are using positive psychology to help their people thrive as they do the best work of their lives.

Connect with Rachael Powell: 

You’ll Learn:

  • [02:29] - Rachael explains how she began applying what she learned in the Masters of Applied Positive Psychology to her leadership of the people and culture function at Xero.
  • [04:22] - Rachael shares why Xero chose Professor Martin Seligman’s PERMAH framework to guide their wellbeing strategy.
  • [05:32] - Rachael outlines how Xero operationalized the PERMAH framework across five different continents in a volatile, uncertain, complex and ambiguous environment.
  • [10:14] - Rachael shares her tips for what’s worked best when it comes to embedding a wellbeing strategy across the workplace.
  • [13:05] - Rachael talks about the struggles of embedding a wellbeing strategy across a workplace and how Xero is working to overcome these.
  • [17:43] - Rachael shares her biggest a-ha when it comes to taking the science of positive psychology and applying it practically in a workplace.
  • [19:50] - Rachael shares her thoughts on the role CEOs and leadership teams play in the success or failure of wellbeing strategies in workplaces.
  • [21:53] - Rachael offers some cautions and caveats for people trying to improve wellbeing in workplaces.
  • [23:09] - Rachael completes the Lightning Round.

Your Resources:

Thanks for listening! 

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.

Please leave an honest review of the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.  And don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

You can also listen to all the episodes of Making Positive Psychology Work streamed directly to your smartphone or iPad through stitcher. No need for downloading or syncing.

Until next time, take care!  Thank you Rachael!

Sep 13, 2019

Robert Quinn is a Professor Emeritus at the University of Michigan's Ross School of Business, one of the co-founders of the field of positive organizational scholarship, and a co-founder of the Ross Centre for Positive Organisations. Bob's research and writing focuses on purpose, leadership, culture and change,and he is in the top 1% of professors cited in organizational behaviour textbooks. The recipient of multiple teaching awards, Bob was recently named one of the top speakers in the world on the topics of organisational culture and related issues. And last year, his talk on personal purpose went viral and has been viewed by over 16 million people. Bob has published 18 books, and his most recent book, The Economics of Higher Purpose, has just been released.

In this week’s podcast we explore the economics of higher purpose in our workplaces and how we can find and consistently honor our purpose.

Connect with Robert Quinn: 

You’ll Learn:

  • [03:22] - Bob explains why the economics of higher purpose is a conversation every workplace should be exploring at the moment.
  • [07:33] - Bob outlines why a higher purpose shifts our mindsets and commitment from being employees or agents to owners in our workplaces.
  • [11:51] - Bob shares how workplaces can envision being a higher purpose organization and overcome the thought walls that might get in their way.
  • [16:03] - Bob explains why organizations need to discover – rather than invest – their higher purpose.
  • [22:13] - Bob shares his tips for embracing the messy and magical process of bringing a higher purpose to life across a workplace.
  • [27:30] - Bob shares the story of how KPMG gave their people the freedom to self-organize and take responsibility for the things that matter most to them in relation to the higher purpose.
  • [33:05] - Bob completes the Lightning Round.

Your Resources:

Thanks for listening! 

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.

Please leave an honest review of the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.  And don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

You can also listen to all the episodes of Making Positive Psychology Work streamed directly to your smartphone or iPad through stitcher. No need for downloading or syncing.

Until next time, take care!  Thank you Bob!

Sep 6, 2019

David Bryce Yaden is a Research Fellow and PhD student at the University of Pennsylvania, where he works in the Positive Psychology Centre. David's research focus is on the psychology and neuroscience of spiritual, self-transcendent and other positively transformative experiences. Specifically, he's interested in understanding how these experiences can result in longterm changes to wellbeing. And how they alter fundamental faculties of consciousness, such as the sense of time, space, and self. He's the editor of the book, Being Called. And he's currently writing a book called, The Varieties of Spiritual Experiences: A Twenty-First Century Update. His work is being covered by the New York Times, the Wall Street Journal, the Washington Post, New York Magazine, and NPR.

In this week’s podcast, we explore how positively transformative experiences can leave us feeling called to our futures and the impact they can have on our wellbeing and performance.

Connect with David Yaden: 

You’ll Learn:

  • [03:53] - David explains why we’re called by our futures – not just pulled by the past - and what impact this has for our wellbeing.
  • [06:28] - David outlines the difference between trying to find meaning and purpose in our work, to being called to the work we do.
  • [09:07] - David shares what his research is finding makes a positively transformative moment possible for each of us.
  • [11:06] - David explores if positively transformative experiences can be created or need to be allowed to spontaneously occur.
  • [13:13] - David outlines what his research is finding in terms of the impact the positively transformative moments might have for us or others.
  • [16:58] - David explores potential interventions workplaces can use to create positively transformative experiences for people and their limitations.
  • [20:33] - David outlines ways workplaces can help people to feel more called to their work.
  • [22:30] - David completes the Lightning Round.

Your Resources:

Thanks for listening! 

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.

Please leave an honest review of the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.  And don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

You can also listen to all the episodes of Making Positive Psychology Work streamed directly to your smartphone or iPad through stitcher. No need for downloading or syncing.

Until next time, take care!  Thank you David!

Aug 30, 2019

Loretta Breuning is the founder of the Inner Mammal Institute, which helps people manage the ups and downs of their mammal brain. As professor emerita of management at California State University East Bay, Loretta's research explores how people can discover the power of their mammalian operating system. The author of several books, including Habits of a Happy Brain, Loretta had shared her research, and talks all over the world.

In this week’s podcast, we explore our brain’s happy chemicals and how we can create more happy chemicals as we work.

Connect with Loretta Breuning: 

You’ll Learn:

  • [02:11] - Loretta explains how dopamine work and why it is important for us at work.
  • [05:10] - Loretta offers some practical ways to spark more dopamine at work.
  • [06:33] - Loretta outline how endorphins help our brains to perform.
  • [09:00] - Loretta explores if endorphins might help ease social or emotional pain at work.
  • [10:15] - Loretta explains the upside and the downside of oxytocin at work.
  • [13:01] - Loretta explores how oxytocin can help us to build belonging and psychological safety in workplaces.
  • [16:44] - Loretta explains how serotonin shapes our relationships at work.
  • [21:35] - Loretta outlines how we can create happy brain habits to stimulate these chemicals.
  • [23:43] - Loretta completes the Lightning Round.

Your Resources:

Thanks for listening! 

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.

Please leave an honest review of the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.  And don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

You can also listen to all the episodes of Making Positive Psychology Work streamed directly to your smartphone or iPad through stitcher. No need for downloading or syncing.

Until next time, take care!  Thank you Loretta!

Aug 23, 2019

Michael Steger is the founder and director of the Centre for Meaning and Purpose, and a professor of psychology at Colorado State University. Endlessly curious about learning how to create a life worth living, Michael has spent the better part of two decades studying the vital role that meaning and purpose play in our work, health, relationships, growth, and happiness. His research has been featured in academic and general publications around the world, and he's also written several books on this topic, including Purpose and Meaning in the Workplace.

In this week’s episode, we explore how meaning can be found in any job, and how workplaces can help people find the right balance to minimize both boredom and burnout.

Connect with Michael Steger: 

You’ll Learn:

  • [02:29] - Michael explains why a growing number of workplaces have become interested in helping their people find more meaning in their work.
  • [05:40] - Michael shares what the research is finding when it comes to creating more meaning in our work.
  • [08:04] - Michael explains why meaning is an ongoing process when it comes to our work and some of the simple ways we can find more meaning in what we do each day.
  • [14:19] - Michael offers some tips for leaders and workplaces to help people make their work more meaningful.
  • [20:46] - Michael explains what the research is finding about having too much meaning at work, and how we can keep this in balance.
  • [25:02] - Michael completes the Lightning Round.

Your Resources:

Thanks for listening! 

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.

Please leave an honest review of the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.  And don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

You can also listen to all the episodes of Making Positive Psychology Work streamed directly to your smartphone or iPad through stitcher. No need for downloading or syncing.

Until next time, take care!  Thank you Michael!

Aug 16, 2019

Ethan Kross is a professor of psychology at the University of Michigan's top-ranked social psychology programme. He's an award-winning scientist and teacher who studies how the conversations people have with themselves impact their health, performance, decisions, and relationships. And his research has been published in academic journals and featured in the New York Times, the Economist and the New Yorker, to name just a few.

In this week’s episode, we explore how we can avoid being sucked into negativity vortex by using self-distancing and other simple hacks to improve our self-regulation at work.

Connect with Ethan Kross: 

You’ll Learn:

  • [02:03] - Ethan outlines the consequences of becoming stuck in a negativity vortex at work.
  • [03:38] - Ethan explains how the practice of self-distancing can help us to avoid the negativity vortex.
  • [05:14] - Ethan provides examples of how the language we use can help us to self-distance during moments of rumination.
  • [07:27] - Ethan shares some tips for practicing self-distancing successfully.
  • [08:47] - Ethan explains how self-distancing can be taught in workplaces.
  • [10:41] - Ethan shares some other simple hacks to help us avoid the vortex of negativity at work.
  • [13:48] - Ethan offers some insight into the current evidence-based debates on how self-control and willpower works.
  • [16:05] - Ethan explains how to avoid co-rumination when it comes to our relationships at work and instead be an effective supporter of others.
  • [19:37] - Ethan provides some cautions on using distancing wisely and not as an avoidance strategy.
  • [21:33] - Ethan completes the Lightning Round.

Your Resources:

Thanks for listening! 

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.

Please leave an honest review of the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.  And don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

You can also listen to all the episodes of Making Positive Psychology Work streamed directly to your smartphone or iPad through stitcher. No need for downloading or syncing.

Until next time, take care!  Thank you Ethan!

Aug 9, 2019

Jeremy Clifton is a doctoral candidate in psychology at the University of Pennsylvania under Dr. Martin Seligman, who is often regarded as the founder of positive psychology. After an initial career in urban economic development strategy, Jer has spent five years creating a foundational, empirically-derived typology of primal world beliefs, and his research examines many of these variables and their impact on well-being, personality traits and character strengths, professional success, depression, and voting behaviour.

In this podcast, we explore how our primal beliefs about the world impact our levels of wellbeing, trust, and success at work.

Connect with Jeremy Clifton: 

You’ll Learn:

  • [03:07] - Jer explains what his research is finding out about our primal world beliefs.
  • [05:36] - Jer helps us to understand how primals differ from our other beliefs like growth mindsets.
  • [06:58] - Jer outlines the 26 primal beliefs his research has uncovered.
  • [09:56] - Jer helps us to understand what a ‘good’ primal might mean practically for us when it comes to our work and wellbeing.
  • [12:37] - Jer explains what his research has found to date about the stability or our primal beliefs.
  • [14:45] - Jer explores if our primal beliefs are shaped by nature or nurture.
  • [17:53] - Jer shares his thoughts on whether workplaces should be trying to cultivate higher levels of specific primal beliefs like ‘good’ in order to improve wellbeing and success.
  • [20:52] - Jer explores the potential impact of primals on psychological safety in workplaces.
  • [24:49] - Jeremy completes the Lightning Round.

Your Resources:

Thanks for listening! 

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.

Please leave an honest review of the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.  And don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

You can also listen to all the episodes of Making Positive Psychology Work streamed directly to your smartphone or iPad through stitcher. No need for downloading or syncing.

Until next time, take care!  Thank you Jer!

Aug 2, 2019

Sigal Barsade is a professor of management at the Wharton School of Business and focusses her research on emotional intelligence, organizational culture, unconscious bias, teamwork, leadership, and organizational change. Having consulted for organizations of all sizes across a myriad of industries, including Cisco, Coca Cola, Deloitte, Google, the NBA, and the United Nations, Sigal’s research has been featured in leading academic research journals and in media outlets around the world.

In today’s episode, we explore why loneliness in workplaces is on the rise, how it impacts our wellbeing and performance, and how we can tackle it together. We also learn more about the contagion of loneliness and other emotions in the workplace and how we can manage this better.

Connect with Sigal Barsade: 

You’ll Learn:

  • [02:25] - Sigal explains the impact of loneliness in workplaces on our wellbeing and performance.
  • [08:57] - Sigal helps us understand why loneliness is on the rise in many workplaces.
  • [11:02] - Sigal explains what leaders and organizations can do to address the loneliness epidemic many workplaces are experiencing.
  • [14:20] - Sigal outlines how we can help lonely people help themselves in workplaces.
  • [16:23] - Sigal explores if talking about loneliness in workplaces improves people’s wellbeing or creates further isolation.
  • [18:04] - Sigal explains why loneliness can be contagious and how emotions can spread in workplaces and communities.
  • [19:21] - Sigal shares why leaders are more emotionally contagious in workplaces.
  • [21:39] - Sigal offers some tips for leaders to help manage their moods and how they infect their teams more mindfully at work.
  • [23:32] - Sigal offers some insights for leaders to positive infect the mood in their team.
  • [26:03] - Sigal completes the Lightning Round.

Your Resources:

Thanks for listening! 

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.

Please leave an honest review of the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.  And don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

You can also listen to all the episodes of Making Positive Psychology Work streamed directly to your smartphone or iPad through stitcher. No need for downloading or syncing.

Until next time, take care!  Thank you Sigal!

Jul 25, 2019

Dr. Kelly McGonigal is a health psychologist and lecturer at Stanford University. As a pioneer in the field of science help, her mission is to translate insights from psychology and neuroscience into practical strategies that support personal wellbeing and strengthen communities.

Kelly is the author of several books, including the international bestseller, The Willpower Instinct, The Upside Of Stress, and her upcoming book, The Joy Of Movement. Her TED Talk, How To Make Stress Your Friend, is one of the most viewed TED Talks of all time with over 20 million views.

In today’s podcast, we explore how we can tap into our different stress responses to shape our wellbeing and performance at work.

Connect with Kelly McGonigal: 

You’ll Learn:

  • [03:12] - Kelly shares some of the latest research insights on the upside of stress when it comes to our wellbeing and performance at work.]
  • [06:45] - Kelly explains biologically how our fight-or-flight stress response helps us to engage better with life.
  • [07:53] - Kelly shares how a challenge stress response can help us step up in challenging situations.
  • [10:16] - Kelly explains how a social stress response can help us reach for courage and connection during challenging experiences.
  • [14:37] - Kelly outlines how our resilience stress response works to help us learn and grow in the face of difficult or traumatic experiences.
  • [18:46] - Kelly explains how we can trigger the stress responses that will serve us best as we navigate work and life.
  • [21:49] - Kelly recommends some exercises to help build our levels of stress confidence so we can respond in the ways that serve us and others best.
  • [27:24] - Kelly shares her tips on how we can help to shape the conversations about reducing stress in workplaces.
  • [33:38] - Kelly completes the Lightning Round.

Your Resources:

Thanks for listening! 

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.

Please leave an honest review of the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.  And don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

You can also listen to all the episodes of Making Positive Psychology Work streamed directly to your smartphone or iPad through stitcher. No need for downloading or syncing.

Until next time, take care!  Thank you Kelly!

Jul 12, 2019

Dr Peggy Kern who is an associate professor at the Centre for Positive Psychology at the University of Melbourne’s Graduate School of Education. Her research is collaborative in nature and draws on a variety of methodologies to examine questions around who thrives in life and why. She is the world’s leading researcher on measuring wellbeing using the PERMAH pillars, and has published 2 books and over 80 peer-reviewed articles and chapters.

In today’s episode, we explore how systems informed positive psychology is can help workplaces to think more holistically about their wellbeing strategies and the tools that researchers and practitioners can use to help them take a systems approach.

Connect with Peggy Kern: 

You’ll Learn:

  • [02:37] - Peggy explains why we need a systems-informed approach when it comes to improving wellbeing in our workplaces.
  • [04:01] - Peggy defines how a systems-informed positive psychology approach makes visible what is invisible.
  • [05:19] - Peggy shares some of the underlying assumptions of positive psychology research and practices that limit our ability to positively impact a system.
  • [07:51] - Peggy offers some tips for helping leaders embrace “simplexity’ when it comes to understanding how to impact wellbeing in their workplace.
  • [09:59] - Peggy explores how we can better understand what is happening across a workplace to create a systems-informed approach for improving wellbeing.
  • [11:28] - Peggy explains how Appreciative Inquiry approaches can be used to help map a system's response for workplaces wanting to improve wellbeing.
  • [15:31] - Peggy shares how mapping energy networks in workplaces can help identify the best people and teams to target for wellbeing interventions in the system.
  • [17:54] - Peggy explains why a systems-informed mindset needs us to let go of the illusion of control and instead learn to dance between order and chaos.
  • [21:26] - Peggy shares why creating feedback loops is an important part of any systems informed strategy to improve wellbeing.
  • [23:41] - Peggy explains how thinking though a systems lens can help us to build our growth mindsets, psychological safety, and self-compassion.
  • [23:41] - Peggy explains why systems are always changing and what this means for our workplace wellbeing strategies.
  • [27:39] - Peggy completes the Lightning Round.

Your Resources:

Thanks for listening! 

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.

Please leave an honest review of the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.  And don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

You can also listen to all the episodes of Making Positive Psychology Work streamed directly to your smartphone or iPad through stitcher. No need for downloading or syncing.

Until next time, take care!  Thank you Peggy!

Jul 5, 2019

Jerry Colonna is the CEO and Co-Founder of reboot.io, an executive coaching and leadership development firm dedicated to the notion that better humans make better leaders. After many years as a partner and founder of private equity firms, Jerry has spent the last 20 years using the knowledge gained as an investor, an executive, and a board member for more than 100 organizations, to help entrepreneurs and others to lead with humanity, resilience, and equanimity to overcome the psychological baggage that has held them back professionally. In his new book 'reboot, leadership and the art of growing up', Jerry captures his unique blend of Buddhism, Jungian therapy and entrepreneurial insight. 

In this week’s episode, we explore why better humans make better leaders, and what we can do practically to improve our leadership and resilience skills as we work.

Connect with Jerry Colonna: 

You’ll Learn:

  • [02:37] - Jerry explains why better humans make better leaders.
  • [04:01] - Jerry shares why so many leaders struggle to prioritize becoming better human beings.
  • [05:19] - Jerry outlines why we tend to be fixated on outcomes in workplaces, even when this approach often burns us out.
  • [07:51] - Jerry explains the simple steps we can take to become more effective and resilient leaders who don’t burn ourselves out.
  • [09:59] - Jerry offers some questions to help us create a sense of wellbeing and discover the kind of leaders we are capable of being.
  • [11:28] - Jerry explains how our stories about our past, present, and future shape our belief systems and the outcomes we’re able to achieve.
  • [15:31] - Jerry offers some tips to help leaders challenge the stories that undermine their resilience and effectiveness as leaders.
  • [17:54] - Jerry explains how our willingness to be better humans helps us to build more psychological safety in our workplaces.
  • [21:26] - Jerry explains how why becoming a better human being is an ongoing process and how we can navigate it gracefully.
  • [23:41] - Jerry shares his formula for enhancing leadership and building greater resiliency.
  • [27:39] - Jerry completes the Lightning Round.

Your Resources:

Thanks for listening! 

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.

Please leave an honest review of the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.  And don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

You can also listen to all the episodes of Making Positive Psychology Work streamed directly to your smartphone or iPad through stitcher. No need for downloading or syncing.

Until next time, take care!  Thank you Jerry!

Jun 28, 2019

Nataly Kogan is the creator of the Happier Method, and an entrepreneur, speaker, and author, whose mission is to help millions of people optimize their emotional health through science-backed practical skills, so they can thrive in work and life.
She's the founder of Happier, whose online courses, Happier@Work Training Programmes, and her book Happier Now, have helped more than a million people live their best life.

In this week’s episode we explore why happiness is a set of skills that workers can build in any organization, and the small, practical ways this can be incorporated into even the busiest of days.

Connect with Nataly Kogan: 

You’ll Learn:

  • [03:11] - Nataly shares the many benefits researchers are finding of having happier employees in workplaces.
  • [05:53] - Nataly offers some tips for helping skeptical leaders discover the value of having happier employees.
  • [09:02] - Nataly explains why our goal shouldn’t be perfecting the skills of happiness if we want to be happier.
  • [11:57] - Nataly explains why measuring people’s levels of confidence and motivation to shape their wellbeing may be a better goal than overall happiness.
  • [13:45] - Nataly explains how we can build our happiness skills at work.
  • [15:46] - Nataly outlines the five key happiness skills every worker needs.
  • [20:23] - Nataly provides some examples of how these happiness skills can be built in practices that take no more than a few minutes as people go about their jobs.
  • [25:40] - Nataly offers some advice on how to help busy leaders embed these happiness skills into the way they work each day.
  • [28:16] - Nataly completes the Lightning Round.

Your Resources:

Thanks for listening! 

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.

Please leave an honest review of the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.  And don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

You can also listen to all the episodes of Making Positive Psychology Work streamed directly to your smartphone or iPad through stitcher. No need for downloading or syncing.

Until next time, take care!  Thank you Nataly!

Jun 21, 2019

Mandy O'Neill is an associate professor of management at the George Mason University School of Business. Mandy's research focuses on how conceptualizing organizational culture as a function of emotions and gender enhances the link between culture and a number of individual teams, organizational processes, and outcomes, including decision making, attitudes, career success, health behavior, corporate strategy, and financial performance. Her research has been featured in journal and media publications all over the world.

In this week’s episode, we explore why leaders and teams need to invest in creating healthy emotional cultures and the practical steps they can take based on the latest research in workplaces.

Connect with Mandy O'Neill: 

You’ll Learn:

  • [02:54] - Mandy explains what her research has found about the importance and bottom-line value of intentionally, managing the emotional culture of an organization.
  • [04:48] - Mandy outlines what an emotional culture strategy might look like practically in workplaces.
  • [07:21] - Mandy explains why creating a healthy emotional culture doesn't mean leaders should try to eliminate negativity.
  • [10:12] - Mandy shares an example of how a health organization intentionally improved their emotional culture.
  • [13:09] - Mandy offers guidance on the best ways to measure a workplace’s emotional culture.
  • [17:03] - Mandy provides some tips for how we can practically improve the emotional culture of our workplaces and create more affection, caring, and concern for each other.
  • 21:45] - Mandy offers some suggestions for navigating more uncomfortable conversations with each other.
  • [25:20] - Mandy completes the Lightning Round.

Your Resources:

Thanks for listening! 

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.

Please leave an honest review of the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.  And don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

You can also listen to all the episodes of Making Positive Psychology Work streamed directly to your smartphone or iPad through stitcher. No need for downloading or syncing.

Until next time, take care!  Thank you Mandy!

Jun 14, 2019

Chris Myers is an assistant professor in the management and organization discipline, the academic director of executive education at the John Hopkins University Carey Business School and holds a joint appointment in anesthesiology at the John Hopkins University School of Medicine. Chris' research and teaching focuses on individual learning, leadership development and innovation with particular attention to how people learn vicariously and share knowledge and his work has been recognized with several scholarly awards and has been featured in a range of leading academic journals and popular media articles and outlets.

In this week’s podcast, we explore why focusing on learning opportunities can help workers to manage their levels of stress and how opportunities for coactive vicarious learning ensures there are no passive observers to the learning process.

 

Connect with Chris Myers: 

You’ll Learn:

  • [02:53] - Chris explains why focusing on learning opportunities, rather than gritting our teeth, grinding through or taking a break, can be a more effective way of dealing with stress at work.
  • [05:59] - Chris offers some tips to help us reach for learning opportunities during moments of stress.
  • [07:56] - Chris shares some examples of how workplaces are encouraging their workers to reach for more learning opportunities.
  • [09:34] - Chris explains why when teams engage together in learning behaviour, they report significantly lower levels of burnout.
  • [11:08] - Chris outlines how learning together in teams helps to improve workers growth mindsets and their levels of psychological safety.
  • [12:07] - Chris explains why the process of vicarious learning has been found to be one of the most effective ways for teams to learn together.
  • [13:53] - Chris walks us through how coactive vicarious learning takes our ability to learn together a step further, by ensuring there are no passive observers to the learning process.
  • [18:19] - Chris provides some tips on how the process of coactive vicarious learning could be used to amplify the use of wellbeing strategies in workplaces.
  • [20:20] - Chris offers some caveats and cautions for supporting coactive vicarious learning in your workplace.
  • [22:58] - Chris completes the Lightning Round.

Your Resources:

 

Thanks for listening! 

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.

Please leave an honest review of the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.  And don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

You can also listen to all the episodes of Making Positive Psychology Work streamed directly to your smartphone or iPad through stitcher. No need for downloading or syncing.

Until next time, take care!  Thank you Chris!

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