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Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast

If you believe as I do that by uncovering tested, practical ways to help people move from functioning to flourishing at work, we can better navigate the incredible challenges and opportunities our world faces, then this podcast is for you. My goal each week is to give you access to the world’ leading positive psychology, positive organizational scholarship and neuroscience researchers and practitioners to explore their latest research findings on how you can improve wellbeing, develop strengths, nurture positive relationships, make work meaningful and cultivate the grit to accomplish what matters most. If you want evidence-based approaches to bringing out the best in yourself and others at work, then consider this podcast your step-by-step guide.
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Now displaying: December, 2019
Dec 20, 2019

George Bonanno is professor of clinical psychology, Director of the Lost Trauma and Emotion Lab, and Director of The Resilience Center for Veterans and Families at Columbia University’s Teacher’s College. George’s research focuses on resilience in the fact of loss and traumatic events.  

Most of us have the natural tools to deal with extreme adversities in our lives. We cope well when extreme things happen to us.  To deal with the world around us, it takes a repertoire of behaviors.  Sometimes, this involves what George calls “coping ugly.”  Sometimes we might need to do something that doesn’t seem pretty but is reasonably effective.  

Connect with George Bonanno:

Website for Lost Trauma and Emotion Lab

You’ll Learn:

  • [01:55] - George will be presenting on loss, trauma, and resilience at the 5th World Congress on Positive Psychology.  He shares what he would like attendees to take home from his presentation. 
  • [03:45] - Media coverage ensures that we are aware of negative events.  The negative psychological consequences can be overcome, and eventually they go away.
  • [05:38] - George believes that resilience is natural and speaks to the fact that organizations are spending money on trying to enhance resilience.
  • [08:50] - George talks about the behaviors that make us cope better.   
  • [11:43] - “Coping ugly” is a phrase that George coined and he talks about what this means.  
  • [12:55] - George talks about how laughter can be an example of coping ugly.  
  • [14:20] - We all know the famous five stages of grief.  George states that these stages have been harmful to many people.  
  • [16:25] - The Lightning Round with George Bonanno

Your Resources:

Thanks for listening!

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.  

Also, please leave an honest review for the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.

And finally, don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

Special thanks to George for joining me this week. Until next time, take care!

Dec 13, 2019

Kim Cameron is one of the top 10 scholars in organizational sciences. Kim recently spoke at the Canadian Conference on Positive Psychology and he talks with us about positive and relational energy.

Positive energy and relational energy has a tremendous positive impact on individuals and organizations. So today, I talk with Kim Cameron, a leading scholar on these topics and positive psychology.

In this interview, you will hear how the positive impact of positive energy and relational energy are measurable down to the cellular level. Kim also shares that contribution is more powerful than achievement and he provides examples from the University of Michigan. Some employees may perceive positive practices as manipulation and Kim shares why he believes this opposition will not become more common.

This interview was produced in partnership with the Canadian Positive Psychology Association and the 3rd Canadian Conference on Positive Psychology.

Tune in to hear more!

Kim Cameron’s Website: http://webuser.bus.umich.edu/cameronk/?_ga=1.99712030.1617036109.1465915693

You’ll Learn

  • [2:20] - People with positive energy and relational energy are four times more likely to succeed.
  • [5:53] - The characteristics of positively energizing leaders.
  • [7:45] - The heliotropic effect and how to unleash it.
  • [9:22] - Contribution goals trump achievement goals
  • [12:58] - Kim talks about the culture of abundance and its positive impact on organizations.
  • [14:34] - The notion of happiness and well-being can be used as a manipulation.
  • [16:18] - Positive practices show results at the cellular level.
  • [18:31] - The lightning round with Kim Cameron

Your Resources:

 

Thanks for listening!

Thanks so much for joining me again this week. If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of the post.

Also, please leave an honest review for Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.

And finally, don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

Special thanks to Caroline for joining me this week. Until next time, take care!

Dec 5, 2019

My guest today is David Cooperrider, renowned for his research in appreciative inquiry, a strength-based approach to creating change.

In this interview, you will hear how appreciative inquiry is being used to build a better world. David explains how organizations can align strengths in ways that make the system’s weaknesses irrelevant. He also shares how individuals and organizations can use this life-centric approach to go through the steps of his new P.O.S.I.T.I.V.E change model.

This interview was produced in partnership with the Canadian Positive Psychology Association and the 3rd Canadian Conference on Positive Psychology.

Tune in to hear more!

Connect with Wayne Baker: 

Website: www.davidcooperrider.com

Twitter: @Dlc6David

You’ll Learn

  • [2:25] - David explains the basics of appreciative inquiry
  • [4:52] - What you and your organization can gain from this positive change approach
  • [5:27] - Rethinking our approach to change.
  • [7:05] - Step P - Positive re-framing
  • [9:30] - Step O - Omni search and bringing in all of the strengths at every level
  • [10:50] - Step S - Strengthen the strengths
  • [12:28] - Step I - Imagining our future
  • [14:40] - Steps T & I - Translate and improvise
  • [16:30] - Step V - Valuing progress moments
  • [18:02] - Step E - Embedding the change and reversing our mindset on change
  • [20:50] - The lightning round with David Cooperrider

Your Resources:

Thanks for listening! 

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.

Please leave an honest review of the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.  And don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

You can also listen to all the episodes of Making Positive Psychology Work streamed directly to your smartphone or iPad through stitcher. No need for downloading or syncing.

Until next time, take care!  Thank you David!

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