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Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast

If you believe as I do that by uncovering tested, practical ways to help people move from functioning to flourishing at work, we can better navigate the incredible challenges and opportunities our world faces, then this podcast is for you. My goal each week is to give you access to the world’ leading positive psychology, positive organizational scholarship and neuroscience researchers and practitioners to explore their latest research findings on how you can improve wellbeing, develop strengths, nurture positive relationships, make work meaningful and cultivate the grit to accomplish what matters most. If you want evidence-based approaches to bringing out the best in yourself and others at work, then consider this podcast your step-by-step guide.
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Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast
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Mar 9, 2018

Reuben Rusk is the founder of Mind Quip, a social enterprise in Christ Church New Zealand whose vision is to create a happier and more productive workforce. Reuben is a lifelong learner and a big picture thinker who's passionate about teaching people to improve their lives and their wellbeing by distilling large amounts of research into down to earth training about what matters most. An experienced presenter and recognized expert in well being and resilience, Reuben’s research has been published in the Journal of Positive Psychology, the psychology of wellbeing, and the Journal of Happiness studies.

In today’s episode, we’ll be talking about the five domains Rueben’s research has found lie at the heart of more than 18,000 peer-reviewed positive psychology intervention articles and how these can be combined to create a synergistic and holistic approach to create wellbeing behavior changes that work.

Connect with Reuben Rusk:

Website: mindquip.com

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You’ll Learn:

  • [02:00] - Reuben identified more than 18,000 documents, and here talks about what he found that can help us to improve our well being?
  • [03:47] - Reuben discusses the five clusters of terms that he identified.
  • [07:09] - Reuben talks about how the synergistic change model might help to shape our wellbeing.
  • [08:59] - Reuben explains how the synergistic change model provides a framework to think through some important complexities.
  • [11:41] - Reuben talks about how he helps people understand how to navigate emotional and social complexities.
  • [12:50] - Reuben discusses the concept of relapse.
  • [14:45] - Reuben explains how to think synergistically across those five domains of emotions, attention and awareness, comprehension and coping, goals and habits and social relationships, when trying to make a positive intervention.
  • [15:58] - Reuben talks about the environmental factors that can affect positive interventions.
  • [18:38] - Reuben discusses how the simpler option is not necessarily easier, and how simplifying complex systems can do more harm than good.
  • [21:37] - Lightning Round with Reuben Rusk

Your Resources:

Thanks for listening!

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.

Please leave an honest review for the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.  And don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

You can also listen to all the episodes of Making Positive Psychology Work streamed directly to your smartphone or iPad through stitcher. No need for downloading or syncing.

Until next time, take care!  Thank you Reuben!

Mar 1, 2018

David Desteno is a Professor of Psychology at Northeastern University where he directs the social immersions group. David’s research examines the mechanisms of the mind that shape vice and virtue, and his work continually reveals that human moral behaviour is much more variable than most would predict. He’s regularly featured in the media, including the New York Times, the Wall Street Journal, and the Harvard Business Review to name just a few. David is the author of several books including Emotional Success, The Truth about Trust, and the co-author of the Wall Street Journal’s spotlight psychology best seller, Out of Character.

In today’s episode David shares his research on self-control and why harnessing social emotions – like gratitude, compassion and pride – can be an effective and energizing way to improve our levels of grit.

Connect with David Desteno:

Website: www.davedesteno.com

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You’ll Learn:

  • [01:56] - David talks about the ability to be future oriented and persevere to our future goals is an important part of life.
  • [03:27] - David explains how the human mind tends to discount the value of the future.
  • [05:01] - David lists gratitude, compassion and pride, as the social emotions that help with control and grit?
  • [06:58] - David discusses how being self interested and aggressive is not an effective recipe for success, in the long term.
  • [07:42] - David explains that what is adaptive for helping other people is adaptive for ourselves as well.
  • [09:03] - David talks about how people who practise gratitude, compassion and pride, will demonstrate greater perseverence and less procrastination. He also discusses how the practise of meditation and mindfulnes can improve these qualities.
  • [10:21] - David talks about making a habit of taking pride in steps along the way, not just when you reach your ultimate goal.
  • [14:02] - David explains how pride can lead to perseverance.
  • [15:47] - David gives examples of things that we can do to create a sense of authentic pride for ourselves.
  • [17:21] - David details the intersection between the social emotions and our ability to maintain a growth mindset as we go about our jobs.
  • [18:42] - David talks about our biases on who we choose to show compassion to, and how.
  • [20:00] - David gives some practical tips on how to cultivate more compassion to improve relationships at work.
  • [21:32] - David lists some other emotions that play into our social relationships, impact the choices we make, and our levels of self-control and grit.
  • [22:24] - Lightning round with David Desteno.

Your Resources:

Thanks for listening!

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.

Please leave an honest review for the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.  And don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

You can also listen to all the episodes of Making Positive Psychology Work streamed directly to your smartphone or iPad through stitcher. No need for downloading or syncing.

Until next time, take care!  Thank you David!

Feb 22, 2018

Jo Mitchell is a clinical psychologist and co-founder of the Mind Room, a health, wellbeing and performance psychology practice in Melbourne, Australia. Jo has over 20 years of sports industry experience and has a specialist interest in working with high performers across all fields to improve their wellbeing, particularly by using the tools of Positive Psychology, Acceptance Commitment Therapy and Mindfulness. She is also on the board for Action for Happiness Australia.

In today’s episode, we’ll be discussing how to introduce wellbeing practices into workplaces that are cautious or skeptical about ‘soft skills’. We’ll explore how to tailor language, create a systems approach and a new app that opens this science up to a much wider market.

Connect with Jo Mitchell:

Website: themindroom.com.au

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You’ll Learn:

  • [01:58} - Jo explains how she taylors the language used to present ideas of positive psychology, to be openly accepted in typically tough and competitive workplaces.
  • [04:55] - Jo talks about setting up a support network to help footballers stick with newly learned behaviours, using repetition and reinforcement.
  • [10:24] - Jo talks about her new wellbeing mobile app called Mind Max.
  • [14:37] - Jo discusses the gender bias in men around wellness and wellbeing.
  • [20:45] - Jo explains how we can prevent burnout by scheduling moments of rejuvenation into our daily life, and the importance of giving ourselves permission to do this.
  • [21:39] - Lightning round with Jo Mitchell

Your Resources:

Thanks for listening!

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.

Please leave an honest review for the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.  And don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

You can also listen to all the episodes of Making Positive Psychology Work streamed directly to your smartphone or iPad through stitcher. No need for downloading or syncing.

Until next time, take care!  Thank you Jo!

Feb 15, 2018

Patty McCord is a workplace innovator, culture and leadership consultant, and former chief talent officer at Netflix. Patty has many years of working with business leaders and aspiring management to help people realize and practice leadership. She is the author of a wonderful new book, Powerful: Teams, Leaders and the Culture of Freedom and Responsibility, which pushes the boundaries of thinking about the way we work. From abolishing performance reviews to challenging the need for policies, Patty believes people come to work as fully formed adults with a desire to make an impact and to be proud of what they do. Her ideas have been featured in publications around the world, including the Harvard’s Business Review, Fast Company and The Wall Street Journal.

In today’s podcast Patty explains why mapping engagement and happiness measures against productivity in workplaces may undermine the very results workplaces are trying to create.  She also shares how Netflix built a thriving culture by treating employees like adults, balancing freedom and responsibility and replacing performance reviews with radical honesty.

Connect with Patty McCord:

Website: pattymccord.com

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You’ll Learn:

  • [02:03] - Patty gives some of the dangers of overlaying engagement and happiness scores with team performance.
  • [06:48] - Patty talks about the value of saying something radically honest every day.
  • [07:53] - Patty explains how if you practise giving people feedback every day, 50% of it will work and be positive feedback.
  • [11:24] - Patty says why the freedom and responsibility has to live inside of the business that you're trying to accomplish.
  • [12:28] - Patty explains why strategy is figuring out what not to do.
  • [16:52] - Patty tells how to orchestrate vigorous debates to encourage people to get curious, and put themselves on the other side of the argument.
  • [19:23] - Patty gives examples of what should managers do instead of formal perfomance reviews.
  • [21:40] - Lightning round with Patty McCord.

Your Resources:

Thanks for listening!

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.

Please leave an honest review for the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.  And don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

You can also listen to all the episodes of Making Positive Psychology Work streamed directly to your smartphone or iPad through stitcher. No need for downloading or syncing.

Until next time, take care!  Thank you Patty!

Feb 8, 2018

Dr. Peter McGraw is an associate professor of marketing and psychology at the University of Colorado Boulder’s Leeds School of Business. As a behavioral scientist, his research examines the interrelationship of judgment, emotion, and choice—with a focus on the production and consumption of entertainment. McGraw directs The Humor Research Lab (HuRL) and is the co-author of The Humor Code: A Global Search for What Makes Things Funny.

His research has been covered by The New York Times, Wall Street Journal, TIME NPR, BBC, and CNN. His work appears in the Journal of Consumer Research, Journal of Marketing Research, Management Science, Psychological Science, and the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology.  He is currently trying to kick a sweater vest habit – even if it does get him kicked off the Stylist Scientist List.

Today we’re talking all about humor; how it can bring people together and push them apart. We’ll also cover it’s role in generating success for several key business areas.

Connect with Pete McGraw:

Website: petermcgraw.org/

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You’ll Learn:

  • [03:17] - Pete explains the principles of humour, and it's commonalities and differences across various demographics.
  • [05:03] - Pete dicsuses how to cultivate humour.
  • [07:32] - Pete covers the negative side of humour, and how it should be regulated in a work environment.
  • [09:53] - Pete talks about humour within cultures, and how forgiveness can be a complimentary quality.
  • [11:03] - Pete uses the analogy of being a supporting actor in life, and how productive it is when people act with this mindset.
  • {16:59] - Pete discusses the role of humour in sales and marketing, and how enthusiasm is a powerful tool for making an impact.
  • [18:55] - Pete lists some qualities that present charisma, including the use of movement and well placed silence.
  • [20:41] - Lightning round with Peter McGraw.

Your Resources:

Thanks for listening!

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.

Please leave an honest review for the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.  And don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

You can also listen to all the episodes of Making Positive Psychology Work streamed directly to your smartphone or iPad through stitcher. No need for downloading or syncing.

Until next time, take care!  Thank you Gervase!

Feb 1, 2018

Gervase Bushe is the Professor of Leadership and Organisational Development at the Beedie School of Business, Simon Fraser University in Vancouver, Canada. His career spans over three decades of transforming organisational structures, cultures and processes, away from command and control and towards more collaborative work systems. Gervase is an award winning author of over one hundred papers and has three books on organisational change, leadership, teams and teamwork. His newest co-authored book, “Dialogic Organisation Development: The Theory and Practise of Transformational Change,” builds on his ground breaking research into how appreciative inquiry leads to transformational change, and is gathering international acclaim. He has consulted to blue chip corporations and start-ups, public sector and business corporations in a variety of sectors and, in 2016, HR Magazine in the UK added him to their list of the 30 Most Influential HR thinkers.

Today we’re talking with Gervase about how to create changes in workplaces that enable them to flourish. Gervase shares his award-winning insights on why we need to understand more about how living systems thrive, the role of leaders and the danger of big visions, and how to ask generative questions that shift people’s thinking and behavior.

Connect with Gervase Bushe:

Website: gervasebushe.ca

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You’ll Learn:

  • [03:05] - Gervase introduces transformational change processes, and explains the results of tests he's done in that area.
  • [07:18] - Gervases gives his experience of how self organisation has been integrated into the workplace.
  • [11:26] - Gervase explains the difference between a 'positive' and 'generative' approach.
  • [16:27] - Gervase shares his tips on asking more generative questions.
  • [16:35] - Gervase talks about how to focus on developing positive traits, rather than trying to eliminate the negative.
  • [26:59] - Lightning round with Gervase Bushe

Your Resources:

Thanks for listening!

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.

Please leave an honest review for the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.  And don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

You can also listen to all the episodes of Making Positive Psychology Work streamed directly to your smartphone or iPad through stitcher. No need for downloading or syncing.

Until next time, take care!  Thank you Gervase!

Jan 25, 2018

Peggy Holman is an author and consultant who employs dialogical practices to turn passivity into participation. Her award-winning book, Engaging Emergence: Turning Upheaval into Opportunity, provides a roadmap for tackling complex systems challenges. In the Change Handbook she and her co-authors profile 61 processes that enable diverse groups to create their desired future. As co-founder of the non-profit, Journalism that Matters, Peggy has helped to cultivate a journalism community of practise that is committed to journalism, which supports communities and democracy to thrive.

Today we’re talking to Peggy about what researchers are learning enables workplaces and systems to flourish, and why chaos rather than balance holds the key to learning and growth. Peggy shares her insights on how to create positive disruptions that enable a system to change, why passion and responsibility are the keys to authentic leadership and how leaders can mobilize and support people in taking action.

Connect with Peggy Holman:

Website: www.peggyholman.com

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You’ll Learn:

  • [03:40] - Peggy explains why it's important to challenge the current systems in place, and how disturbance can prompt change.
  • [07:47] - Peggy talks about how to actively guide disruptive factors, rather than taking a passive approach.
  • [15:16] - Peggy discusses the benefits of open space technology.
  • [18:47] - Peggy explains why organisations have difficulty embracing self organisation.
  • [21:10] - Peggy covers how self organisation has been proven to benefit work processes.
  • [22:25] - Peggy gives examples of principles and support that can help open space technology function at it's best.
  • [23:20] - Peggy talks about some new approaches that have been discovered.
  • [25:11] - Peggy lists some cautions and caveats when implementing these approaches.
  • [25:51] - Lightning round with Peggy Holman

Your Resources:

Thanks for listening!

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.

Please leave an honest review for the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.  And don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

You can also listen to all the episodes of Making Positive Psychology Work streamed directly to your smartphone or iPad through stitcher. No need for downloading or syncing.

Until next time, take care!  Thank you Peggy!

Jan 18, 2018

Jacqueline Stavros is an Associate Professor at the Lawrence Technological University and has been honored with the LTU Inaugural Presidential Research Award. She’s known for her creation of SOAR, a profoundly positive approach to strategic thinking, planning, and leadership, based on the concept of Appreciative Inquiry.

Today we’re talking to Jacqui about how the SOAR framework and how this can be used to help organizations and teams take a strengths-based, systems approach to strategic planning. and the kind of results they might expect.  Jacqui helps us to understand how SOAR differs from SWOT approaches, how to help the cynics embrace a more strengths-orientated approach and how you conduct a quick SOAR in just a few hours with a team.

Connect with Jacqueline Stavros:

Website: http://soar-strategy.com/

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You’ll Learn:

  • [02:14] - Jackie talks about 'meeting people where they're at].
  • [02:50] - Jackie explains generative questions.
  • [03:43] - Jackie gives an introduction to SOAR (strengths, opportunities, aspirations & results) and how it works.
  • [05:55] - Jackie gives example of which situations SOAR is most appropriate for.
  • [08:59] - Jackie explains the '5 'I' Approach'.
  • [12:05] - Jackie discusses the impact of SOAR on the workplace.
  • [17:15] - Jackie talks about potential cautions and caveats of using SOAR.
  • [24:18] - Lighting round with Jacqueline Stavros.

Your Resources:

Thanks for listening!

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.

Please leave an honest review for the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.  And don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

You can also listen to all the episodes of Making Positive Psychology Work streamed directly to your smartphone or iPad through stitcher. No need for downloading or syncing.

Until next time, take care!  Thank you Jackie!

Dec 21, 2017

Reb Rebele is the Research Director for Wharton People Analytics, and teaches in the Masters in Applied Positive Psychology Programme at the University of Pennsylvania. Reb's research, writing and consulting projects bring behavioral science and research into the world of work, to drive better employee experiences and organizational outcomes.

Today we're talking to Reb about why being a 'giver' at work can backfire and cause you to hurt the very people you want to help and burn yourself out in the process.  Discover what drives giving behaviors at work, the practical steps you can take to be a self-protective giver and what leaders can do to create their dream team of reciprocity approaches.

Connect with Reb Rebele:

Website: www.rebrebele.com

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You’ll Learn:

  • [01:44] - Reb explains how helpfulness creates value in the workplace.
  • [03:21] -  Reb talks about how giving too much can be draining and counter-productive.
  • [08:05] - Reb discusses the generosity spectrum that he calls 'reciprocity style' - that includes takers, matchers & givers.
  • [11:37] - Reb explores how personality styles, beliefs and mindsets might drive these behaviors.
  • [14:15] - Reb shares the habits of highly effective giving, including how you can perform small five minute favors.
  • [19:31] - Reb talks about how leaders can build dream teams of reciprocity styles.
  • [23:48] - Lightning round with Reb Rebele

Your Resources:

Thanks for listening!

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.

Please leave an honest review for the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.  And don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

You can also listen to all the episodes of Making Positive Psychology Work streamed directly to your smartphone or iPad through stitcher. No need for downloading or syncing.

Until next time, take care!  Thank you Reb!

Dec 14, 2017

Amy Wrzesniewski is a Professor of organizational behavior at the Yale School of Management. For almost two decades, her research has focused on how people make meaning of their work in challenging work contexts or conditions Her findings have been published in a wide range of top academic journals, and highlighted in several best-selling books and popular press outlets, including Forbes, Time, Business Week, Harvard Business Review, U.S. News and World Report, The Economist, as well as bestselling books such as Drive by Daniel Pink, The Happiness Advantage by Shawn Achor, Authentic Happiness by Martin Seligman, and The Art of Happiness by the Dalai Lama and Howard Cutler.

Do you wish you had more meaning in your work?  Amy explains how you can craft your job, whatever your role and status, to find more meaning in what you do each day at work.  She also shares practical tips for leaders to create an environment that encourages job crafting among employees to help them feel more proactive, engaged and productive at work.

Connect with Amy Wrzensieski:

Website: www.jobcrafting.org

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You’ll Learn:

  • [02:10] - Amy defines job crafting.
  • [04:02] - Amy explains the value of meaning in our work, including how it affects our job choices, longevity of a particular role, and peoples perception of their careers.
  • [07:32] - Amy gives examples of how leaders can support job crafting for employees.
  • [09:46] - Amy suggests ways people can create more meaning in their own work.
  • [12:58] - Amy discusses the latest findings and developments in job crafting.

Your Resources:

Thanks for listening!

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.

Please leave an honest review for the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.  And don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

You can also listen to all the episodes of Making Positive Psychology Work streamed directly to your smartphone or iPad through stitcher. No need for downloading or syncing.

Until next time, take care!  Thank you Amy!

Dec 7, 2017

Christopher Kukk is a Professor of Political Science and Social Science at Western Connecticut State University, the Founding Director for the Centre for Compassion, Creativity and Innovation, the author of the Compassionate Achiever, and the co-host of the Compassionate Achiever Podcast. Chris’ research and publications combine neuroscience with the social sciences and focus on education issues, the political economy of natural resources, and the creation and sustainability of civil society. Chris was also a counterintelligence agent for the United States Army, and is regularly featured in the media for his analysis on a wide range of topics and issues.

Today Chris explains the neurological differences between empathy and compassion and why compassion may be the key to success in workplaces. He also shares his simple four step approach to creating more compassion and ways this can be practically be applied in workplaces.

Connect with Chris Kukk:

Website: http://chriskukk.com/

You’ll Learn:

  • [02:16] - Chris explains the difference between empathy and compassion
  • [05:51] - Chris discusses the complications of empathy and why it can lead to burn out.
  • [07:09] - Chris talks about how compassion leads to success personally and professionally.
  • [11:10] - Chris gives an example to show how kindness is a precursor to compassion and how this can help us to be more effective givers.
  • [12:42] - Chris lists the 4 steps for cultivating compassion (LUCA) - 'listen to learn', 'understanding to know', 'connect to capabilities' and 'act to solve'.
  • [19:19] - Chris explains how to teach these skills in workplaces.
  • [25:10] - Lightning round with Chris Kukk

Your Resources:

Thanks for listening!

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.

Please leave an honest review for the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.  And don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

You can also listen to all the episodes of Making Positive Psychology Work streamed directly to your smartphone or iPad through stitcher. No need for downloading or syncing.

Until next time, take care!  Thank you Chris!

Nov 30, 2017

Jennifer Moss is a researcher, Co-founder of Plasticity Labs, and a member of the Workplace Happiness Group at the United Nations Global Happiness Council. She is considered to be a Workplace Culture Expert and Thought Leader on the topic of happiness and emotional intelligence, and is author of the bestselling book Unlocking Happiness at Work.

In this conversation, Jen guides us through the seven traits that enable happy and high performing employees and offers simple happiness hacks any workplace can use to help improve people's wellbeing.  She also cautions us about the happiness inhibitors that can bring us unstuck and why being happy at work doesn't mean avoiding stress or sadness.

Connect with Jennifer Moss:

Website: https://plasticitylabs.com/

You’ll Learn:

  • [02:38] - Jen discusses the traits needed for people to be happy and effective at work.
  • [07:27] - Jen talks about how paying attention to the little things can have a big impact on productivity.
  • [10:27] - Jen explains how you can utilize technology to better engage with staff, and learn what's happening in the workplace.
  • [12:12] - Jen talks about the three R's of building habits and why habits don't get created in 21 days.
  • [14:45] - Jen gives examples of how to create habits that help improve wellbeing.
  • [19.21] - Jen explains how to make changes at work a more positive experience.
  • [21:44] - The lightning round with Jennifer Moss

Your Resources:

Thanks for listening!

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.

Please leave an honest review for the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.  And don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

You can also listen to all the episodes of Making Positive Psychology Work streamed directly to your smartphone or iPad through stitcher. No need for downloading or syncing.

Until next time, take care!  Thank you Jen!

Nov 23, 2017

Gabrielle Kelly is the SAHMRI Wellbeing and Resilience Centre's inaugural director. Gabe is a filmmaker, digital media executive, social entrepreneur and strategist, who has worked on human behaviour and systems change in a range of settings, including the groundbreaking Adelaide Thinkers in Residence Programme, where she commissioned and led the residency of professor Martin Seligman in South Australia in an effort to build mental wellbeing and resilience and reduce mental illness at a societal level. 

In this conversation, Gabe takes us inside the amazing work being done across the state of South Australia to help an entire population flourish.  She explains the PERMA PLUS dashboard and measure they have created to build a common language for resilience and wellbeing and walks us through the LIMBE approach they have created for embedding systems change.

 

Connect with Gabrielle Kelly:

Website: http://www.wellbeingandresilience.com/

You’ll Learn:

  • [01:55] - Gabe shares how she convinced an entire State to invest in improving the wellbeing and resilience of its population.
  • [05:10] - Gabe walks us through how she's learned to deal with the cynics of positive psychology and wellbeing approaches.
  • [08:18] - Gabe explains the PERMA PLUS model the State has adopted to education and measure wellbeing and resilience.
  • [13:58] - Gabe shares the LIMBE approach they have created to help implement systems change.
  • [20:44] - Gabe provides a real life example of using positive psychology and resilience training to deliver wellbeing, resilience and bottom line results to help closing car manufacturers.
  • [28:11] - The Lightning Round with Gabrielle Kelly

 

  • Your Resources:

 

Nov 16, 2017

Fred Bryant is Professor of Social Psychology at Loyola University in Chicago, where he teaches on Social Psychology, Personality Statistics, and Research Methods. Fred has won numerous teaching awards.  He has produced more than 200 professional publications in Psychology, has presented over 150 papers at professional conferences around the world, and given numerous invited addresses and workshops at many prominent universities.  Fred is best known for his work on savoring, on which he has conducted cross-cultural investigations in a variety of Eastern and Western cultures. 

In this discussion, you will hear Fred talk about the practice of savoring and the impact it has on your wellbeing.  Fred summarizes the research on savoring, the process by which savoring works, practical ways we can introduce more savoring into workplaces and cautions for where savoring may go wrong. He also explains why women are generally better at savoring than men!

Connect with Fred Bryant:

Website: bryant.socialpsychology.org

You’ll Learn:

  • [02:00] - Fred’s research shows that we don’t always make the most out of the positive experiences. He explains why this is the case. 
  • [03:34] - Fred shares what his studies show about the impact of savoring on our wellbeing.
  • [06:29] - Fred describes the benefits of savoring in the workplace.
  • [09:32] - Fred explains that if happiness and joy are outcomes, then savoring is the process through which they are achieved, and exactly how this process works.
  • [10:42] - Fred shares what it might look like if we apply this model of savoring to our everyday lives.
  • [12:23] - Savoring doesn’t need to just be about the present. Fred explains how time impacts our ability to savor through reminiscence.
  • [15:33] - Fred talks about the difference between savoring in the moment and mindfulness.
  • [18:09] - Fred shares what his research has shown about gender differences in savoring.
  • [20:46] - Celebrating success is a double-edged sword. Fred cautions avoiding excessive celebration.
  • [22:09] - The Lightning Round with Fred Bryant. 

Your Resources:

Thanks for listening!

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.  

Please leave an honest review for the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.  And don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

You can also listen to all the episodes of Making Positive Psychology Work streamed directly to your smartphone or iPad through stitcher. No need for downloading or syncing.

Until next time, take care!  Thank you Fred.

 

Nov 9, 2017

Jessica Amortegui is the Senior Director of Learning and Development at Logitech. Logitech were the winners of the 2016 Positive Business Project Competition, presented by the Center for Positive Organizations at The University of Michigan’s Ross School of Business. Logitech designs personal peripherals, and they connect customers to their digital experiences. They are recognized for their work in creating community, where it’s employees are invigorated by the work that they do each day. Jessica has spent many years studying, writing about, and applying the practices of positive psychology and positive organizational scholarship.

In this conversation, you will hear Jessica share how Logitech is helping its employees use their strengths intelligently at work. She talks about the changes the company has seen from individuals completing the VIA Survey, using job crafting and participating in the free online strengths challenge and explains how Logitech is taking the next step of helping people discover the fears that get in the way of them using their strengths effectively at work.

Connect with Jessica Amortegui:

Website - JessicaAmortegui.com

You’ll Learn:

  • [02:30] - Jessica tells us what Logitech is doing to helping people put their strengths to work each day.
  • [06:02] - Recently, hundreds of Logitech employees joined us for the free online strengths challenge. Jessica talks about the change that has been seen from individuals picking one strength to work on.
  • [07:46] - Jessica talks about how Logitech is taking things one step further with strengths by looking at the fears that get in the way of using our strengths intelligently.
  • [10:44] - Jessica provides some examples of things that are holding people back from being able to embrace their strengths at work.
  • [15:05] - Jessica shares information on creating a safe environment for people to have more authentic conversatioins about their strengths.
  • [17:40] - Getting leaders prepared to support people after the workshops is vital. Jessica explains how she is doing this.
  • [19:18] - The Lightning Round with Jessica Amortegui

Your Resources:

Thanks for listening!

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.

Please leave an honest review for the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.  And don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

You can also listen to all the episodes of Making Positive Psychology Work streamed directly to your smartphone or iPad through stitcher. No need for downloading or syncing.

Until next time, take care!  Thank you Jessica!

Nov 2, 2017

Robert McGrath is Professor of Psychology at Fairleigh Dickinson University.  He is also a Senior Scientist at the VIA Institute on Character, program evaluator for Thriving Learning Community, a character development program implemented in fifty middle schools around the United States, and Director of Integrated Care for the Underserved of Northeast New Jersey.  

In this conversation, you will hear Robert talk about the exciting work he is doing with various assessments at the VIA Institute.  He shares the latest tools and insights to assess and understand character strengths and explains how these can help you to bring out the best in yourself and others at work.

 

Connect with Robert McGrath:

Website:  http://fdu-psych.com/mcgrath

You’ll Learn:

  • [01:53] -Bob explains how you can use your character strengths at work.
  • [04:53] - Bob shares how understand the rankings of their character strengths in the VIA survey and what this means practically for developing our strengths.
  • [9:01] - Bob talks about the recent research on the overuse and underuse of our strengths and how this impacts our ability to flourish at work.
  • [10:44] - Bob shares how character strengths are being used to assist in clinical diagnosis.
  • [13:20] - Bob talks about the new Global Assessment of Character Strengths and how this can help people to identify the strengths they find essential to their identity.
  • [18:00] - Bob shares the new Signature Strengths Survey and talks about how this can be used to gather 360 degree feedback.
  • [19:40] - Bob has been working on re-examining the character strengths virtue groupings and why new studies suggest there are three, rather than six virtues.
  • [24:16] - The Lightning Round with Robert McGrath

Your Resources:

Thanks for listening!

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.  

Please leave an honest review for the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.  And don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

You can also listen to all the episodes of Making Positive Psychology Work streamed directly to your smartphone or iPad through stitcher. No need for downloading or syncing.

Until next time, take care!

Oct 26, 2017

Linda Robson is a scholar practitioner, blending work in executive education with consulting and coaching around the elevation of organizations and the individuals who work within them.  Linda received her Ph.D. from Case Western Reserve University.  She studied with David Cooperrider and Ron Frey.  She is an advisor at the Fowler Center for Sustainable Value. Linda also helped write The Flourishing Enterprise: The New Spirit of Business

In this conversation, you will hear Linda share her fascinating research on the language used by high performing teams and why the words we speak impact the results we are able to achieve particularly in organizational change programs. Linda also shares while simply being more positive is not enough, why we need to acknowledge the sense of loss that any change in our workplaces can bring and the practical things leaders can do to use language to improve people's wellbeing at work.

 Connect with Linda Robson:

Email - Linda.Robson@Case.edu

You’ll Learn:

  • [02:20] - Linda explains why Professor David Cooperrider believes her research will be so influential in helping organizations navigate change.
  • [04:23] - Linda defines and describes mirror flourishing.
  • [06:55] - Linda shares why language plays such a large role in our interactions with each other and our willingness to embrace and act upon change.
  • [07:48] - Linda talks about what positive and negative language sounds like, in the workplace.
  • [09:07] - Linda explains that the use of positive language is a missed opportunity.
  • [12:18] - Linda shares what we can do to help leaders be more strategic in their language.
  • [14:40] - Linda talks about the idea of some forms of negative language being helpful with change in workplaces.
  • [20:20] - Linda explains what a flourishing enterprise looks like.
  • [22:56] - The Lightning Round with Linda Robson.

Your Resources:

Thanks for listening!

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post. 

Please leave an honest review for the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.  And don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

You can also listen to all the episodes of Making Positive Psychology Work streamed directly to your smartphone or iPad through stitcher. No need for downloading or syncing.

Until next time, take care!

 

Oct 19, 2017

Anna Box is a psychologist, story strategist, and founder of Screen and Soul, where she delivers film and thriving workshops, designed to deliver evidence-based well-being and performance psychology, all while feeling like a day at the movies.  In all she does, Anna mashes the art of story with the science of thriving.   

Connect with Anna Box:

Anna Box on LinkedIn - https://www.linkedin.com/in/annabox/

You’ll Learn:

  • [02:55] - Anna explains how to fuse storytelling and thriving in workplaces.
  • [04:45] - Anna talks about the role of Joseph Campbell’s “Hero's Journey Approach” in storytelling.
  • [06:05] - Anna describes how she’s teaching leaders to improve thriving in workplaces by helping them understand more about the hero’s journey.
  • [10:30] - Anna shares cautions about using film to teach wellbeing and how to protect from those things.
  • [17:02] - Anna shares that the neuroscience of stories work.
  • [18:14] - Anna discusses teaching leaders how to tell stories that might help to improve their people’s wellbeing.
  • [20:12] - The Lightning Round with Anna Box.

Your Resources:

Thanks for listening!

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.  

Please leave an honest review for the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.  And don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

You can also listen to all the episodes of Making Positive Psychology Work streamed directly to your smartphone or iPad through stitcher. No need for downloading or syncing.

Until next time, take care!

Oct 12, 2017

Scott Barry Kaufman is an author, researcher, speaker, and public science communicator. He is interested in using psychological science to help all kinds of minds live a creative, fulfilling, and meaningful life. Scott is a professor of positive psychology at The University of Pennsylvania. His research has been featured in The Atlantic, Scientific American, Psychology Today, and the Harvard Business Review, just to name a few of the many publications.  Scott is the host of The Psychology Podcast, which I highly recommend listening to.

In this conversation, you will hear Scott talk about creativity in the workplace. While creativity can be messy, and organizations typically don’t like “mess,” Scott explains how a “no agenda zone”, openness to new experiences, opportunities for awe and other leadership behaviors can improve people's creativity.  We also explore the psychological tools of growth mindsets, git and self-compassion that may be needed to support creative risk taking.  shares some ways we can improve our creativity at work.

Connect with Scott Barry Kaufman:

Website: ScottBarryKaufman.com
Podcast: The Psychology Podcast

You’ll Learn:

  • [02:26] - Creativity is messy and organizations typically don’t like a mess.  Scott explains how they can embrace creativity by embracing uncertainty.
  • [05:10] - Scott discusses the relationship between positive emotion and the creative process.
  • [07:42] - Scott talks about the latest in the neuroscience of creativity.  He talks about the importance of “the imagination network.”
  • [09:14] - Scott shares way researchers are finding can improve our creativity at work.
  • [11:20] - Scott explains how awe can impact our creativity.
  • [13:46] - Scott talks about how unusual environments can foster creativity, and what organizations and leaders can do to create weird experiences.
  • [16:15] - Scott talks about the psychological skills of growth mindsets and self-compassion that enables us to take creative risks.
  • [17:20] - The Lightning Round with Scott Barry Kaufman.

Your Resources:

Thanks for listening!

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.  

Please leave an honest review for the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.  And don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

You can also listen to all the episodes of Making Positive Psychology Work streamed directly to your smartphone or iPad through stitcher. No need for downloading or syncing.

Until next time, take care!

Oct 5, 2017

Dr. Suzy Green is a coaching and clinical psychologist and founder of the Positivity Institute, a positively deviant organization dedicated to the research and application of positive psychology for life, school, and work.  She also holds a number of honorary academic positions at The Institute for Positive Psychology and Education, The Australian Catholic University, The Graduate School of Education at The University of Melbourne, and The Black Dog Institute. Her work has been published in articles around the world.

In this conversation, you will hear Suzy share the research on why cultivating positive emotions matter when it comes to our performance and wellbeing at work.  Suzy shares the practical things employees, leaders and organizations can do to improve mood in workplaces and how to implement these approaches at a systems level.

 

Connect with Suzy Green:

Website - http://thepositivityinstitute.com.au

You’ll Learn:

  • [02:00] - Suzy and I recently had the opportunity to work together on researching and writing a chapter for the new Handbook of the Psychology of Positivity and Strengths-Based Approaches to Work.  Suzy shares what stood out to her in this research.
  • [04:17] - There has been a lot of debate about measuring positivity ratios as a way to assess our wellbeing. Suzy shares the advice that she gives her clients about that approach.
  • [06:16] - Suzy explains the importance of self-awareness when it comes to managing our moods.  
  • [08:38] - If you are looking to boost your heart-felt positivity, Suzy gives you her go-to activities.
  • [09:56] - Suzy shares some advice if you are in a leadership role and trying to boost positivity within your team.
  • [12:03] - Suzy provides some advice to companies wanting to implement these ideas in authentic ways.
  • [14:50] - Suzy talks about helping organizations go beyond training with these practices.
  • [21:01] - Suzy shares what sees as the most compelling parts of the business case at the moment, based on research.
  • [25:05] - The Lightning Round with Suzy Green

Your Resources:

Thanks for listening!

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.  

Please leave an honest review for the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.  And don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

You can also listen to all the episodes of Making Positive Psychology Work streamed directly to your smartphone or iPad through stitcher. No need for downloading or syncing.

Until next time, take care!

Sep 29, 2017

BJ Fogg is an experimental psychologist who directs the behavior design lab at Stanford University.  He is renowned for creating breakthrough methods for changing human behavior. These methods are called, “Tiny Habits.”  Fortune Magazine has named BJ one of the 10 New Gurus You Should Know.

In this conversation, you will hear BJ talk about the tiny habits method.  He explains how small behavior changes are easier to implement and sustain when it comes to creating lasting positive changes.  He shares the three simple steps you can take to make tiny habits part of your daily wellbeing routine.

Connect with BJ Fogg:

Website: TinyHabits.com

You’ll Learn:

  • [01:29] - BJ talks about his research on making positive behaviors stick.
  • [02:09] - BJ explains what a “tiny habit” is and how it works.
  • [04:12] - BJ describes how he used the tiny habits method with daily pushups.
  • [06:19] - BJ talks about our brains adapting to tiny habits.
  • [07:23] - In case the habit isn’t “taking.” BJ shares how to tweak the recipe.
  • [10:26] - BJ explains that simplicity lies at the heart of behavior change.
  • [13:35] - BJ tells us why celebration is important to help behavior changes continue.
  • [18:34] - BJ shares how his newest research is looking to uncover super tiny ha bits that have the biggest impact on our wellbeing.

Your Resources:

Thanks for listening!

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.  

Please leave an honest review for the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.  And don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

You can also listen to all the episodes of Making Positive Psychology Work streamed directly to your smartphone or iPad through stitcher. No need for downloading or syncing.

Until next time, take care!

Sep 22, 2017

Dr. Richard Davidson is the William James and Vilas Professor of Psychology and Psychiatry and the Director of The Waisman Laboratory for Brain Imaging and Behavior, both at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. He is a renowned neuroscientist and one of the world’s leading experts on the impact of contemplative practices, such as meditation on the brain. He is perhaps best known for his groundbreaking work on the study of emotions in the brain. This conversation with Dr. Richard Davidson was recorded live at the 2014 World Congress on Positive Psychology.  This recording has never been played before on our podcast.  

In this conversation, you will hear Richard share what neuroscientists are discovering about ways to train our brains to improve wellbeing through small daily practices.

Connect with Richard Davidson:

Websites:

http://richardjdavidson.com
http://investigatinghealthyminds.org

You’ll Learn:

  • [01:38] -  Richard shares what the latest neuroscience research shows in the area of ways to improve wellbeing.
  • [03:10] - Richard explains that wellbeing can be improved with practice. He talks about practices when it comes to improving wellbeing.
  • [05:30] - Richard recommends that people start implementing these practices gradually.
  • [6:26] - Richard encourages you to go to InvestigatingHealthyMinds.org and download the Compassion Meditation Practice.
  • [07:02] - Mindfulness-based stress reduction is another excellent place to start, according to Richard.
  • [07:41] - Richard explains how gratitude practices can help train our brains.
  • [09:30] - Richard says that turning behaviors into habits is an effective way to embed these practices, neurologically.
  • [11:37] - Richard describes some of the newer research now underway to understand how we can train our brains for wellbeing.

Your Resources:

Thanks for listening!

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.  

Please leave an honest review for the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.  And don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

You can also listen to all the episodes of Making Positive Psychology Work streamed directly to your smartphone or iPad through stitcher. No need for downloading or syncing.

Until next time, take care!

Sep 15, 2017

Lindsay Oades is the director and an associate professor at The Center for Positive Psychology at The University of Melbourne, where he oversees the masters of applied psychology program.  Lindsey’s study and application of wellbeing ranges from individuals, mental health systems, educational institutions, workplaces and liveable cities. He has published over 100 journal articles and books chapters on these topics.  He is the co-editor of the International Journal of Wellbeing and a member of the Scientific Advisory Board at the Institute of Coaching at Harvard University.

In this conversation, you will hear Lindsay shares some of the latest findings on how wellbeing practices can improve organizational performance.  He also explains why focusing on improving individual wellbeing alone is not enough, and why we need to also address wellbeing at the team and organizational level and how we can approach this in workplaces. 

Connect with Lindsay Oades:

LindsayOades.com  
Wiley.com  
education.unimelb.edu.au/cpp

You’ll Learn:

  • [02:38] - Lindsay shares why he believes organizations are struggling to capitalize on the growing evidence about how wellbeing practices impact workplaces.
  • [03:59] - Lindsay talks about the individual approaches for applying positive psychology at work.
  • [06:09] - Lindsay explains why cultivating happy workers is overstated.
  • [08:03] - Lindsay shares the importance of improving wellbeing at team levels and how this can be addressed.
  • [14:30] - Lindsay talks about how organizational practices and policies and enable or restrict workplace wellbeing.
  • [16:27] - Lindsay shares the advice he is currently giving to leaders about improving wellbeing at a systemic level.
  • [20:33] - Lindsey explains why wellbeing literacy matters in workplaces.
  • [22:22] - The Lightning Round with Lindsay Oades.

Your Resources:

Thanks for listening!

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.  

Please leave an honest review for the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.  And don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

You can also listen to all the episodes of Making Positive Psychology Work streamed directly to your smartphone or iPad through stitcher. No need for downloading or syncing.

Until next time, take care!

Sep 8, 2017

Emilia Lahti is a researcher and social activist whose life mission is to be a catalyst for human connection, compassion, and nonviolence.  She has given talks at Stanford, UC Berkeley, and Tedx, as well as at Singularity University at NASA Ames, where she studied futurism and exponential technology.  Her work has been featured in the New Yorker, Business Insider, and Forbes, among others.

In this conversation, you will hear Emilia explain Sisu, which I describe as my reserve tank of motivation and energy in those moments when I’m up against something. Sisu exists in the presence of some sort of adversity. As humans, we tend to shy away from things that are difficult, but Sisu allows us to exceed ourselves.

Connect with Emilia Lahti:

Website: http://emilialahti.com

http://sisunotsilence.com

You’ll Learn:

  • [02:01] - Emilia explains that Sisu is a latent inner-power and she explains the difference between Sisu and power or grit.
  • [05:07] - Emilia says that Sisu is a universal capability with all humans.
  • [05:49] - Emilia addresses the question if Sisu is something we are born with or is cultivated.
  • [06:52] - Emila explains what an action mindset is and how it relates to Sisu.  
  • [08:33] - Emila talks about what she is learning about latent power.
  • [11:46] - Emilia shares what we can do for ourselves with Sisu.
  • [13:51] - Emilia provides with another way that we can cultivate Sisu.
  • [17:29] - Emilia explains “Sisu Not Silence” and how she plans to change culture through this venture.
  • [21:39] - Emilia defines the “Dark Sisu Zone.”

Your Resources:

Thanks for listening!

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.  

Please leave an honest review for the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.  And don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

You can also listen to all the episodes of Making Positive Psychology Work streamed directly to your smartphone or iPad through stitcher. No need for downloading or syncing.

Until next time, take care! Thank you Emilia.

Sep 8, 2017

Emilia Lahti is a researcher and social activist whose life mission is to be a catalyst for human connection, compassion, and nonviolence.  She has given talks at Stanford, UC Berkeley, and Tedx, as well as at Singularity University at NASA Ames, where she studied futurism and exponential technology.  Her work has been featured in the New Yorker, Business Insider, and Forbes, among others.

In this conversation, Emilia shares her research on sisu,an ancient Finnish construct that describes what enables you to endure the toughest of life’s situations and take extraordinary action against seemingly impossible odds.  Emilia explains how we might be able to cultivate more sisu and why it can help us to exceed our own expectations and discover what we're really capable of.

Connect with Emilia Lahti:

Website: http://emilialahti.com

http://sisunotsilence.com

You’ll Learn:

  • [02:01] - Emilia explains that sisu is a latent inner-power and the difference between sisu, resilience and grit.
  • [05:49] - Emilia addresses the question if sisu is something we are born with or is cultivated.
  • [06:52] - Emila explains what an action mindset is and how it relates to sisu.  
  • [08:33] - Emila talks about what she is learning about our latent power to exceed our own expectations.
  • [13:51] - Emilia shares why sisu is not a solo endeavor.
  • [17:29] - Emilia explains her “Sisu Not Silence” movement and how she hopes to run the length of New Zealand to end the silence on interpersonal violence.
  • [21:39] - Emilia defines the dark sisu zone and what to do if you find yourself there.

Your Resources:

Thanks for listening!

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.  

Please leave an honest review for the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.  And don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

You can also listen to all the episodes of Making Positive Psychology Work streamed directly to your smartphone or iPad through stitcher. No need for downloading or syncing. Thank you Emilia.

Until next time, take care!

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