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Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast

If you believe as I do that by uncovering tested, practical ways to help people move from functioning to flourishing at work, we can better navigate the incredible challenges and opportunities our world faces, then this podcast is for you. My goal each week is to give you access to the world’ leading positive psychology, positive organizational scholarship and neuroscience researchers and practitioners to explore their latest research findings on how you can improve wellbeing, develop strengths, nurture positive relationships, make work meaningful and cultivate the grit to accomplish what matters most. If you want evidence-based approaches to bringing out the best in yourself and others at work, then consider this podcast your step-by-step guide.
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Nov 10, 2016

Dr. Aaron Jarden is a senior lecturer in psychology at Auckland University of Technology. He is also the president of the New Zealand Association of Positive Psychology.

Aaron has done a lot of research on occupational wellbeing and in this conversation, he talks about how to introduce these practices to workplaces from the upper levels to the front-lines using a  “me, we, us” framework.

Aaron also shares his thoughts on the links between the research community and practitioners.  He also speaks about the gap between the academic world and the general public's perception of wellbeing.

You’ll Learn:

  • [01:40] - Aaron talks about some of his research findings on occupational wellbeing.
  • [03:12] - Aaron shares his thoughts on introducing these practices to workplaces.
  • [05:08] - There are different ways organizations implement these practices and Aaron shares the different strategies and his thoughts on the variety of techniques.
  • [06:23] - A challenge in implementing occupational well-being strategies is convincing leaders to buy in. Aaron talks about this necessary and difficult step in the process.
  • [08:13] - Aaron talks about varying levels of senior leadership and the upward trend in this area.
  • [09:14] - Aaron talks about the importance of small interventions that can make a huge difference to well being, that don't cost a lot..
  • [12:09] - Aaron shares an effective quick three-breath exercise to create a positive mindset.
  • [13:16] - Aaron talks about the poor job researchers do of communicating science to the public and what the research community can do to repair that.
  • [17:13] - Aaron talks about the difference between academics and general public understandings of wellbeing.
  • [19:02] - The Lightning Round with Dr. Aaron Jarden.

Your Resources:

Dr. Aaron Jarden’s website

Positive Psychology at Work: How Positive Leadership and Appreciative Inquiry Create Inspiring Organizations - Sarah Lewis

Elon Musk Biography

Second Wave Positive Psychology: Embracing the Dark Side of Life - Itai Ivtzan and Tim Lomas

Thanks so much for joining me again this week. If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.

Also, please leave an honest review for the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.

And finally, don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free! Special thanks to Aaron for joining me this week. Until next time, take care!

Until next time, take care!

Nov 3, 2016

Sarah Lewis is the founder and managing director of Appreciating Change in the UK. Sarah consults for organizations around the world on how to effectively create sustainable change.

In this conversation, you will hear Sarah talk about her philosophies on change and how she helps organizations through the change process. We discuss the questions that must be asked to unleash change. Often, the questions asked pertain to what is going wrong or what is broken. Instead, Sarah talks about the questions that need to be asked to unleash the power to move forward through positive change. Sarah also explains some other methodology for positive change, like World Cafe and Simu-Real.

In the Lightning Round, Sarah shares several authors and books for which she has great appreciation. She also shares that “positivity is a state as well as a trait.”These methodologies are not about ignoring the negativity in life, but rather to help us get to a state where we are coping and thriving.

You’ll Learn:

  • [01:30] - Sarah shares the advice she gives organizations wanting to bring out the best in their people during the change process.
  • [3:21] - Sarah talks about getting leaders to embrace a more system change, rather than a top-down implemented change.
  • [07:10] - Sarah talks about the questions that need to be asked to unleash the power to move forward.
  • [10:04] - Sarah talks about the burning platform and while that might be productive in the short-term, there is difficulty with sustaining that change.
  • [16:27] - Sarah explains the World Cafe and Simu-Real methodologies for change.
  • [22:45] - The Lightning Round with Sarah Lewis.

Your Resources:

Sarah Lewis’ Website
Sarah Lewis’ books on Amazon
Kim Cameron’s books
David Cooperrider’s books
Collaborating for Change: Appreciative Inquiry - David Cooperrider et al.
The Change Handbook: The Definitive Resource on Today’s Best Methods for Engaging Whole Systems - Peggy Holman and Tom Devane

Thanks so much for joining me again this week. If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.

Also, please leave an honest review for the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.

And finally, don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free! Special thanks to Chris for joining me this week. Until next time, take care!

Until next time, take care!

Oct 27, 2016

Chris White is the managing director of the Center for Positive Organizations and the University of Michigan’s Ross School of Business. Chris developed and co-teaches the MBA class on social intrapreneurship.

In this conversation, Chris explains social intrapreneurship - leading positive change without authority - and compares this with social movement activists.   Chris talks about how organizations can create workplace environments to foster more social intrapreneurship,  and where these efforts can go wrong.

You’ll Learn:

  • [01:24] - Chris talks about his presentation on leading positive change without authority. He draws parallels between social movement activists and trying to create change in organizations.
  • [02:06] - Chris goes over the 4 things that occur in social movement theory literature and those also apply to social intrapreneurship .
  • [04:24] - Chris talks about social intrapreneurship.
  • [06:25] - Chris shares his thoughts on the roles of passion, meaning, and purpose play in social intrapreneurship.
  • [08:30] - Chris talks about the things leaders of organizations can do to create more intrapreneur-friendly environments in workplaces.
  • [10:08] - People experience fear that leaders will not embrace intrapreneurship and Chris talks about what levels of the organization need to set the culture of intrapreneurship.
  • [11:25] - Chris points out that Barclay’s is an organization that has fostered and nurtured intrapreneurship.
  • [12:48] - Chris talks about social intrapreneurship gone wrong.
  • [16:00] - The Lightning Round with Chris White.

Your Resources:

Changing Your Company From the Inside Out - Chris White
Chris White’s Blog
Lift: The Fundamental State of Leadership - Ryan Quinn and Robert Quinn
Becoming Wise: An Inquiry into the Mystery and Art of Living - Krista Tippett
PositiveBusinessConference.com

Thanks so much for joining me again this week. If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.

Also, please leave an honest review for the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.

And finally, don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free! Special thanks to Chris for joining me this week.

Until next time, take care!

Oct 20, 2016

Jason Wilburn is the Vice President and General Manager for the Industrial Services Division of Conco Services Corporation. Conco was a finalist in the 2016 Positive Business Project competition, presented by The Center for Positive Organizations at the University of Michigan’s Ross School of Business.

Conco has a lot of remote employees that only see each other face-to-face twice a year, yet are expected to have the familiarity to be able to work effectively together. In January, Conco launched their program to develop and build high-quality connections.

In this conversation, Jason talks about how he and Conco implemented these positive psychology practices. He shares the results and growth that Conco has experienced in 2016, with these practices in place. He also talks about the next steps of maintaining this program of high-quality connections.

You’ll Learn:

  • [01:36] - Jason talks about what he and his team have done at Conco to make 2016 the year of high-quality connections.
  • [04:18] - Jason explains how Conco was able to convince people to buy into these concepts and approaches.
  • [07:17] - Jason talks about the financial benefits of implementing a culture of high-quality connections.
  • [08:30] - The change in culture with Conco has led to an increase in applicants.
  • [09:38] - Jason talks about what sparked his interest in these positive psychology practices.
  • [11:40] - Jason shares his advice on implementing these practices into an organization.
  • [14:48] - Jason talks about how to accomplish the goal of maintaining and turning people from practitioners to teachers.
  • [16:07] - The Lightning Round with Jason Wilburn.

Your Resources:

The Gratitude Journal
The Positive Organization - Bob Quinn
Why Nations Fail - Daron Acemoglu
Originals - Adam Grant
Bully Pulpit - Doris Kearns Goodwin
The Center for Positive Organization’s Positive Business Project

Thanks For Listening!

Thanks so much for joining me again this week. If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.

Also, please leave an honest review for the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.

And finally, don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free! Special thanks to Neil for joining me this week. Until next time, take care!

Until next time, take care!

Oct 13, 2016

Neil Garrett is a cognitive neuroscientist at the University College London. His research investigates the mechanisms by which individuals learn information about the world and the factors that influence learning processes.

Neil Garrett’s website: http://neilgarrett.org/

In this conversation, Neil shares that research suggests that our brains may be wired for optimism. People tend to over-estimate the likelihood of positive events in the future and under-estimate the likelihood of negative events in the future. Although this is not the case with everyone, as there are external factors that can influence this in individuals.

Neil’s findings can help leaders determine the best ways to deliver information in workplaces. There are some negatives that come from this optimism and Neil talks about what those negatives are and explains the necessary balance that needs to happen.

You’ll Learn:

  • [01:27] - Neil shares some takeaways from his presentation at the European Conference on Positive Psychology.
  • [02:13] - According to Neil, research suggests that our brains are wired for optimism. However, this can be influenced by factors such as depression, stress, and anxiety.
  • [03:21] - Neil talks about what is going on neurologically as our brain interprets good and bad information.
  • [05:10] - This filtering of information encourages motivation, but can lead to risk-taking.
  • [05:52] - Neil says that the role of genetics in this process is not yet known.
  • [06:31] - Neil talks about how his findings can influence the workplace.
  • [08:15] - Neil discusses how leaders can use this information to deliver information.
  • [09:47] - Neil talks about the impact technology can have on harnessing our brain’s activity.
  • [10:57] - Neil shares some of his current research, which involves work with firefighters.
  • [12:21] - Neil talks more about the negatives of this optimism, such as risk-taking behaviors and ignoring warning signs.
  • [13:34] - The Lightning Round with Neil Garrett

Your Resources:

The Great Brain Experiment (app)

What I Talk About When I Talk About Running - Haruki Murakami

Sweet Tooth: A Novel - Ian McEwan

Daily Rituals: How Artists Work - Mason Currey

European Conference on Positive Psychology

Positive Psychology Program

Thanks for listening!

Thanks so much for joining me again this week. If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.

Also, please leave an honest review for the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.

And finally, don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free! Special thanks to Sue for joining me this week. Until next time, take care!

Until next time, take care!

Oct 6, 2016

James Pawelski is the director of education and senior scholar in the Positive Psychology Center at the University of Pennsylvania, as well as the author of the book The Dynamic Individualism of William James.  He serves as the founding director of the Masters of Applied Positive Psychology program for more than 10 years, where he teaches courses on positive interventions, the humanities, and human flourishing.  James is an international keynote speaker who regularly makes presentations in English and Spanish.  He has spoken in more then twenty countries and on six continents.  In addition, he also holds paid leadership positions as the founding executive director of the International Positive Psychology Association, member of the steering committee of the International Positive Education Network, and president of the William James Society.

James Pawelski's website: (https://jamespawelski.com/)

In this discussion, James and I talk about the relationship between positive psychology and philosophy, the roots of positive psychology and why we should understand them, the role of the humanities in understanding, and what the positive in positive psychology is.  James tells us about some of his favorite books for gaining insight into human flourishing as well as why he thinks literature and story telling are so important for a happy life. 

You'll Learn:

1:43 – You will learn about James’ recent talk at the European Conference on Positive Psychology about the importance of theory for research and practice.  He talks about the interesting things that happen when you ask careful questions deeply.

3:50 – James talks about what positive psychology means by positive.

5:30 – We hear of how positive psychology, with its focus on what is going well with a person, is complementary to mainstream psychology, which focuses on the negative psychological aspects such as depression or anxiety.

6:58 – James goes into more detail about the relationship between the positive and negative.

8:20 – James answers the question, “Is positive psychology fundamentally about the best things in life, or is it fundamentally about living the best life we can?”

10:40 – We talk more about the importance of a comprehensive approach to positive psychology.

12:00 – The question is raised, “What happens if various positives are in conflict?”

14:28 – James discusses the connection between positive psychology and the humanities.

17:04 – We go into the intersection of positive psychology and the humanities in the workplace.

20:06 – The importance of stories and story telling to a happy life is discussed.

20:36 – James tells us how using the Values in Action Classification of Strengths and Virtues has helped in his own life.

21:27 – He talks about two of his favorite books to help people bring out the best in themselves and others.

22:58 – James talks about a few of the books he is currently reading and why he recommends people studying mindfulness meditation.

24:08 – We hear why James is not a fan of the term optimism and why he prefers the term meliorism.

Your Resources:

James Pawelski’s website (https://jamespawelski.com/)

European Conference on Positive Psychology (www.enpp.eu)

Positive Psychology program (www.PositivePsychologyProgram.com)

International Positive Psychology Association-Learning Library

(Learning Library)

James’ Book List:

Authentic Happiness by Martin Seligman

The Upside to Your Dark Side by Todd Kashdan and Robert Biswas-Diener

Positive Emotion: Integrating the Light Sides and Dark Sides by June Gruber and Judith Tedlie Moskowitz

The Death of Ivan Ilyich by Leo Tolstoy

“Neighbour Rosicky” by Willa Cather

Grit: The Power of Passion and Perseverance by Angela Duckworth

Thanks for listening!

Thanks so much for joining me again this week. If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.

Also, please leave an honest review for the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.

And finally, don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free! Special thanks to Sue for joining me this week. Until next time, take care!

Until next time, take care!

Sep 12, 2016

Sue Langley, is a speaker, master trainer, global business consultant and leading advisor, and founder and CEO of the Langley Group of Companies. Sue has taught thousands of business leaders how to create positive work-places.

Sue Langley’s website: http://suelangley.com/

In this discussion, you will learn about creativity and innovation and how they benefit us as individuals, but also how organizations can foster creativity and innovation beyond just having “a culture of creativity.”You will hear Sue’s thoughts on how leaders and organizations can develop the right climate for creativity and innovation to flourish.

Sue shares a lot of valuable information on her approach with leaders and organizations. You will learn the vocabulary she uses, and how she convinces organizations to be open to the science and research of positive psychology. Sue also shares a recent example of an organization that wasn’t ready for these practices.

You’ll Learn:

  • [1:43] - Having a culture of creativity in an organization isn’t enough to foster innovation and creativity.
  • [2:31] - Sue describes two types of creativity and innovation.
  • [3:25] - The benefits of creativity.
  • [4:25] - Sue shares what research says about creativity.
  • [6:26] - How leaders and organizations can develop the right climate for creativity to flourish.
  • [10:29] - Sue talks about how she convinces leaders and organizations to be open to the science and research of positive psychology.
  • [11:31] - How to implement these changes into an organization.
  • [13:07] - The vocabulary used with organizations when introducing positive psychology and wellbeing.
  • [13:43] - The relationship between positive psychology and profitability.
  • [14:34] - When positive psychology practices aren’t the best fit for an organization.
  • [15:59] - Sue talks about individuals and organizations with too much creativity.
  • [17:30] - The lightning round with Sue Langley.

Your Resources:

Positivity: Top-Notch Research Reveals the Upward Spiral That Will Change Your Life - Barbara Fredrickson - http://a.co/bnlkrv1

Primer in Positive Psychology - Christopher Peterson -http://a.co/2vFFu3Q

Genetics of Psychological Well-Being: The Role of Heritability and Genes in Positive Psychology - Michael Pluess - http://a.co/gsEWpcv

European Conference on Positive Psychology - http://enpp.eu

Positive Psychology Program - http://positivepsychologyprogram.com

Thanks for listening!

Thanks so much for joining me again this week. If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.

Also, please leave an honest review for the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.

And finally, don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free! Special thanks to Sue for joining me this week. Until next time, take care!

Until next time, take care!

Sep 2, 2016

Felicia Huppert is the founding director of the Well-Being Institute at Cambridge University and a leading researcher on the science of well-being and promotion of human flourishing.

Felicia Huppert’s website: http://www.wellbeing.group.cam.ac.uk/who-we-are/founder/

In this interview, you will hear Felicia share her definition and understanding of “wellbeing”, which is “our ability to feel good and function well.”She also talks about what she considers to be the foundation of everything we do, mindfulness. It’s that combination of mindfulness and skills that allows us to navigate life effectively.

Felicia developed the .b (Dot B) program for adolescents to stop and reflect. Studies show the effects on well-being exist three months later. Felicia also discusses the role of self-compassion in our well-being. People who are more self-compassionate are more motivated to change their behaviors in ways they want. Felicia shares her thoughts on the importance of mindfulness training within organizations and how to go through that process.

You’ll Learn:

● [1:32] - Felicia describes her interpretation of “well-being”.
● [2:32] - The 10 features of well-being or flourishing.
● [3:41] - Felicia talks flourishing in life “most of the time”.
● [4:22] - The foundation of everything we do is mindfulness.
● [5:35] -Felicia developed the .b (Dot B) program for adolescents.
● [8:43] - The role of self-compassion in our well-being.
● [11:05] - Controlling emotions is one of the most powerful effects of mindfulness training.
● [12:07] - Mindfulness training within organizations.
● [14:41] - Felicia talks about the importance of shifting the population curve and making the whole population more resilient.
● [17:03] - The Lightning Round with Felicia Huppert

Your Resources:

10 Keys to Happier Living (Vanessa King) - https://amzn.com/1472233425
The Health Gap (Michael Marmot) - https://amzn.com/1632860783
European Conference on Positive Psychology - http://enpp.eu
Positive Psychology Program - http://positivepsychologyprogram.com

Thanks for listening!

Thanks so much for joining me again this week. If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.

Also, please leave an honest review for the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.

And finally, don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free! Special thanks to Felicia for joining me this week.

Until next time, take care!

Aug 26, 2016

Louis Alloro is the co-founder and director of the Certificate in Positive Psychology program. He consults on culture change initiatives all over the world.

Louis Alloro’s website: https://certificateinpositivepsychology.com/capp-faculty/louis-alloro/

In this interview, you will hear Louis describe the Certificate in Positive Psychology program.  He talks about the technical content of this six-month program.  He also shares how the program helps participants “walk the walk” with the concepts that are covered.  This includes how the program prepares participants in how to handle some of the challenges in helping organization implement positive psychology practices.

You’ll Learn:

  • [1:44] - Louis talks about the different types of professionals that are drawn to the Certificate in Positive Psychology program and he describes what this program offers.
  • [3:50] - The Certificate in Positive Psychology program is organized around the Perma-V model and Louis describes what this entails, in regards to technical content.
  • [5:44] - This program covers a lot in six months and Louis shares with us the pace and workflow of the program.
  • [6:48] - Louis talks about helping participants “walk the walk” and putting this technical content into practice.
  • [8:13] - “When happiness is our pursuit, sometimes that causes a deficit in happiness in some people.”
  • [10:13] - Louis talks about the growing trend of stress and burnout in practitioners.
  • [13:07] - Louis addresses resistance of positive psychology practices within organizations, especially at the executive level.  
  • [17:05] - Louis describes how “polarity thinking” helps bring light to interdependent values and how the program teaches how to manage the polarities.
  • [20:12] - The Lightning Round with Louis Alloro

Your Resources:

Sapiens: A Brief History of Humankind - Yuval Noah Harari - https://amzn.com/0062316095

Certificate in Positive Psychology - http://certificateinpositivepsychology.com

Thanks for listening!

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.  

Also, please leave an honest review for the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.

And finally, don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

Special thanks to Ilona for joining me this week. Until next time, take care!

Aug 19, 2016

Maureen McKenna,is a partner at Innovation Works and author of "Pink Steel-Toed Shoes," a story about her experience as the first female manager in manufacturing at Xerox.

She talks with us about her speech at the Canadian Conference about Positive Psychology, on creating a healthy organizational climate, and increasing return on energy.

Maureen's Blog: https://momentsbymoment.com/

You'll Learn:

  • [1:50] What she hopes people took away from her speech at the Canadian Conference
  • [2:40] How to focus on return on energy in the workplace
  • [4:40] Learning from the past, moving forward, and her "Fresh Air" framework
  • [6:40] She tells an anecdote that is an example of self-awareness in the workplace
  • [8:15] How we choose to respond to "Vertical Leadership"
  • [9:10] How to help people to change their mindset and have a safe place for micropractices
  • [12:20] How to challenge each other's thought processes without negative connotations
  • [14:00] The Lightning Round with Maureen McKenna!

Your Resources:

Innovation Works Website: http://www.innovationworks.ca/

"Appreciative Living" - Jacqueline Bascobert Kelm

"Reinventing Organizations" - Frederick Laloux

Canadian Positive Psychology Association

3rd Canadian Conference on Positive Psychology

Thanks for listening!

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.   

Also, please leave an honest review for the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.

And finally, don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

Special thanks to Maureen for joining me this week. Until next time, take care!

Aug 12, 2016

Ilona Boniwell is the program leader for the first Master’s Degree in Applied Positive Psychology in Europe at Angila Ruskin University. She is also the CEO of Positran.

In this interview, you will hear Ilona share her insights on making Positive Psychology real and tangible, and practical for people to integrate into their lives. She also talks about the role of Positive Psychology in the workplace, including how it can be integrated through play, the current state of these practices in Europe, and the terminology she avoids when proposing these changes to organizations.

Ilona Boniwell’s website: https://lifelabs.psychologies.co.uk/users/579-dr-ilona-boniwell

You’ll Learn:

● [2:00] - Ilona talks about her goal of making Positive Psychology “real and tangible.”
● [3:17] - Making strengths real by taking them from a questionnaire and knowing what to do with them.
● [4:52] - Ilona describes The Happiness Dashboard.
● [7:35] - Ilona talks about using the available tools to build our skills and maintain changes.
● [9:04] - The importance of play and it’s role in corporate workplaces.
● [10:55] - Ilona talks about how organizations in Europe are embracing Positive Psychology practices.
● [12:20] - Ilona talks about how she frames this discussion to get organizations on board with these practices.
● [13:40] - Is there a time when positive psychology is not the right solution?
● [15:28] - The Lightning Round with Ilona Boniwell!

Your Resources:

“Positive Psychology in a Nutshell: The Science of Happiness” - Ilona Boniwell 

“Oxford Handbook of Happiness”

“Building a Better Business Using the Lego Serious Play Method” - Per Kristiansen, Robert Rasmussen

“Play: How it Shapes the Brain, Opens the Imagination, and Invigorates the Soul” - Stuart Brown, Christopher Vaughn

The European Conference on Positive Psychology

The Positive Psychology Program

Thanks for listening!

Thanks so much for joining me again this week. If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.

Also, please leave an honest review for the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.

And finally, don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

Special thanks to Ilona for joining me this week. Until next time, take care!

Aug 5, 2016

Gretchen Spreitzer is the faculty director for the Center of Positive Organizations at the Ross School of Business at the University of Michigan.

In this interview, you will hear Gretchen talk about enabling sustainable performance. There are several factors that make it quite easy to get burned out at work and organizations need to implement certain things to promote sustainable performance and allow individuals to thrive. Gretchen gives practical ways for organizations to do this through her four levers to promote sustainability. Gretchen also shares some basic and easily implemented tactics for individuals to thrive.

Gretchen Spreitzer’s website: https://sites.google.com/a/umich.edu/spreitzer/home

You’ll Learn:

● [1:43] - In today’s world, it is easy to get burned out and we need to make performance sustainable.
● [3:44] - Gretchen shares the four levers organizations can use to promote sustainability.
● [7:42] - Gretchen talks about the balance of responsibility between organizations and individuals in regards to employee growth and sustainability.
● [8:40] - What can individuals do when their organization doesn’t promote growth and sustainability?
● [12:05] - Gretchen discusses about her findings that co-working spaces lead to higher mean scores of thriving.
● [15:47] - Gretchen talks about resilience for people in difficult situations. Thriving is not about bouncing back, it’s about bouncing better.
● [17:43] - Thriving and growing proactively, when there isn’t a difficulty or challenge.
● [19:13] - Should organizations expect and encourage an approach of thriving when someone is struggling, personally?
● [20:04] - The lightning round with Gretchen Spreitzer

 

 

Your Resources:

Reflected Best Self Exercise - http://positiveorgs.bus.umich.edu/cpo-tools/reflected- best-self-exercise-2nd- edition/

How to Be a Positive Leader: Small Actions, Big Impact - Jane E. Dutton and Gretchen M. Spreitzer - https://amzn.com/1626560285

The Positive Organization: Breaking Free from Conventional Cultures, Constraints, and Beliefs - Robert E Quinn - https://amzn.com/1626565627

Finding Purpose: Environmental Stewardship as a Personal Calling - Andrew J. Hoffman - https://amzn.com/1783533722

Positive Business Conference - http://positivebusinessconference.com

Thanks for listening!

Thanks so much for joining me again this week. If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.

Also, please leave an honest review for the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.

And finally, don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

Special thanks to Gretchen for joining me this week. Until next time, take care!

Jul 29, 2016

Emiliya Zhivotovskaya is the founder of The Flourishing Center of Benefit Corporation.  She is the creator of the Certification in Applied Positive Psychology. Emiliya talks about the connection of mind and body, specifically in regards to vitality.

Our bodies affect our thoughts and vice versa. So how do we bring that vitality into our lives?  It’s not through major interventions, but rather through daily life hacks.  Emiliya shares a few that you can implement into your life. 

You will learn about the importance of our digestive system in this conversation.  Emiliya talks about how our gut is our “second brain.”  She describes its effect on our our mind body health and lists ways for us to keep the second brain healthy.  This is a conversation with a lot of practical and easily implemented tips and exercises. 

Emiliya Zhivotovskaya’s website

You’ll Learn:

  • [2:06] - Emiliya shares her model of vitality.
  • [6:28] - Why do many researchers teach the mind and body are separate components?
  • [7:10] - Emiliya talks about why we move our bodies.  It’s not to meet an exercise goal, but our cells have inherent wisdom to move.
  • [8:28] - The enteric nervous system tells us our gut is “the second brain.”
  • [10:45] - Daily hacks are a way to bring vitality into our lives.
  • [14:02] - Emiliya talks about the importance of probiotics and prebiotics in our diets.
  • [15:29] - In modern times, we don’t squat enough.  Squatting also helps with healthy bowel movements.
  • [17:33] - Sleep is the foundation of all vitality.
  • [19:35] - The lightning round with Emiliya Zhivotovskaya

Your Resources:

Sapiens: A Brief History of Humankind by Yuval Noah Harari - https://amzn.com/0062316095

Certificate in Positive Psychology - http://getcertifiedinpospsych.com

The Canadian Positive Psychology Association - http://cppa.ca

Thanks for listening!

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post. 

Also, please leave an honest review for the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.

And finally, don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

Special thanks to Emiliya for joining me this week. Until next time, take care!

Jul 22, 2016

Wayne Baker is a professor of management at the University of Michigan’s Ross School of Business. Wayne is also the first director of the Center for Positive Organizations.Wayne talks about the idea of a giving culture at work.

People are inherently generous and often, the biggest barrier is getting people to ask for what they need. Wayne talks about the ROI that a giving culture brings to organizations. He also talks about who is likely to reciprocate and what their motivations might be. I enjoyed this conversation with Wayne Baker and I’m certain you will too!

Wayne Baker’s website

You’ll Learn:

● [1:41] - Wayne shares some takeaways from his presentation at The Positive Business Conference on creating a giving culture.
● [2:30] - Wayne talks about the reciprocity ring.
● [3:21] - What steps need to be taken after an individual makes a request?
● [4:08] - The biggest barrier is getting people to ask for what they need.
● [5:07] - Wayne talks about why so many organizations struggle to create a giving culture.
● [6:35] - This process taps into the fundamental human principle of reciprocity.
● [7:12] - Takers give almost as frequently as givers give.
● [8:03] - The business benefits of the reciprocity ring.
● [10:19] - You can use technology to help you with the reciprocity ring.
● [11:19] - Early adopters become evangelists for the reciprocity ring.
● [12:37] - Setting boundaries in reciprocity and denying the power in reciprocity by not asking.
● [16:15] - Asking without expectations of receiving.
● [17:08] - The Lightning Round with Wayne Baker

Your Resources:

Learn more about the reciprocity ring at http://www.humaxnetworks.com/default.asp

The Reflected Best Self

The Power of Visioning

Give and Take: Why Helping Others Drives Our Success - Adam M. Grant

Seveneves - Neal Stephenson

A Book of Uncommon Prayer: 100 Celebrations of the Miracle & Muddle of the Ordinary - Brian Doyle

The Positive Business Conference

Thanks for listening!

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.

If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.

Also, please leave an honest review for the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.

And finally, don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

Special thanks to Wayne for joining me this week. Until next time, take care!

Jul 15, 2016

Jessica Amortegui is a leading expert in positive psychology and positive organizational scholarship in organizations. Jessica is the Senior Director of Learning and Development at Logitech, where she has developed a two-day workshop on positive psychology practices for her team members.

Jessica shares how she organized this workshop, including her strategy to gain management support and team buy-in. Jessica also talks with us about job crafting and the idea of “the perfect job vs. the best job for us.” I think you will really enjoy this conversation with Jessica Amortegui.

This interview was produced in partnership with the Center for Positive Organization’s Positive Business Project.

Jessica's website: http://www.jessicaamortegui.com

You’ll Learn:

● [2:15] - Jessica talks about need for meaningful experience in order to open people’s hearts and minds to new ways of leading.
● [4:05] - How Jessica got Logitech leadership and the team to buy into a two-day workshop course on leading through positive psychology.
● [5:50] - Jessica shares what she taught the workshop attendees to get them so enthusiastic about these new philosophies.
● [8:21] - Jessica talks about balancing the science and the experience in teaching these practices to team members.
● [10:00] - The perfect job vs. the best job for us.
● [12:18] - Jessica talks about job crafting at Logitech.
● [13:49] - Job crafting through mastery, meaning, and membership.
● [15:49] - When might job crafting might not be ideal?
● [17:51] - Management support and involvement is vital to creating system-wide change.
● [18:28] - The lightning round with Jessica Amortegui

Your Resources:

● VIA Strengths Finder Survey - http://www.viacharacter.org/www/Character-Strengths-Survey
● Shawn Achor Ted Talk - “The happy secret to better work
● Simon Sinek Ted Talk - https://www.ted.com/speakers/simon_sinek
● “Never Split the Difference: Negotiating As If Your Life Depended On It” - Chris Voss & Tahl Raz
● Center for Positive Organization’s Positive Business Project - http://positiveorgs.bus.umich.edu/

Thanks for listening!

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.

If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.

Also, please leave an honest review for the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.

And finally, don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

Special thanks to Ryan for joining me this week. Until next time, take care!

Jul 8, 2016

Ryan Niemiec is a leading expert in mindfulness based strengths practices. Ryan recently spoke at the Canadian Conference on Positive Psychology and in this conversation, he shares his thoughts and findings on mindfulness.

In this interview, you will hear Ryan’s insight into mindfulness. He shares how mindfulness based strength practice can have positive changes in people’s lives. Individuals can use positive psychology to help with problems as much as they do to flourish and mindfulness based strength practice helps manage these problems. Ryan also addresses some of the opposition to mindfulness and the idea that some people are not able to benefit from mindfulness.

This interview was produced in partnership with the Canadian Positive Psychology Association and the 3rd Canadian Conference on Positive Psychology.

Ryan Niemiec’s website: http://www.ryanniemiec.com/

You’ll Learn:

● [2:35] - Self-regulation and curiosity are at the core of mindfulness.
● [4:18] - Ryan shares two ways to integrate self-regulation and curiosity.
● [5:35] - Ryan talks about his 8-week program, “Mindfulness Based Strength Practice”and explains the difference between this program and others.
● [8:10] - Mindfulness based strength practice has a large impact on positive relationships.
● [9:08] - Ryan shares how mindfulness based strength practice can help people manage their problems.
● [10:18] - Ryan provides information on how you can experience the 8-week program.
● [11:52] - Ryan addresses opposition to mindfulness and talks about the idea of deliberate mind-wandering.
● [13:32] - Are there some people that can’t benefit from mindfulness?
● [15:05] - New research on the development and application of character strengths.
● [18:19] - Ryan talks about bringing character strengths to our work and that leading to a “life-calling”.
● [20:00] - The lightning round with Ryan Niemiec

Your Resources:

http://www.viacharacter.org/www/

Thich Nhat Hanh’s books on Amazon

The Illusion of Separateness: A Novel - Simon Van Booy

 

Jul 1, 2016

Bob Vallerand is a leading scholar in motivational processes and optimal functioning. Bob spoke on his theory on passion at Canadian Conference on Positive Psychology and he shares his insights with us in this conversation.

The passions we have as individuals bring satisfaction to our lives. They also help form our identities.  So today, I talk with Bob Vallerand about his research on passion. 

In this interview, you will hear that there are two types of passion, obsessive and harmonious.  Bob shares how obsessive passions develop and that these are not necessarily negative or harmful activities, but can be productive passions that begin to control an individual.  Bob also shares how to identify if a passion is harmonious or obsessive. How do organizations help members develop harmonious passions, which benefit the organization and individuals themselves?  Listen to find out!

This interview was produced in partnership with the Canadian Positive Psychology Association and the 3rd Canadian Conference on Positive Psychology. 

Bob's website: http://www.lrcs.uqam.ca/default_en.htm

You’ll Learn:

  • [1:46] - Passion can be obsessive or harmonious and the benefits of harmonious passion.
  • [2:30] - Bob defines overall passion.
  • [3:40] - Obsessive passions and how these seemingly productive activities can control a person.
  • [5:10] - How to determine if a passion is harmonious or obsessive.
  • [7:11] - Passions can go back and forth from being harmonious and obsessive. Bob shares what makes this change happen.
  • [9:25] - How organizations can nurture harmonious passion with members.
  • [11:25] - Having multiple passions is a healthier situation.
  • [12:08] - How to turn things around when a passion becomes obsessive.
  • [13:16] - There are certain activities in which you will only get the positive benefits if the passion is harmonious.
  • [15:08] - The lightning round with Bob Vallerand.

Your Resources:

“The Psychology of Passion” - Bob Vallerand

“Why We Do What We Do: Understanding Self-Motivation” - Edward Deci

“Flow: The Psychology of Optimal Experiences” - Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi

“Positivity: Top-Notch Research Reveals the Upward Spiral That Will Change Your Life” - Barbara Fredrickson

Canadian Positive Psychology Association

Jun 24, 2016

Robert Quinn is a world leading expert on positive organizations, and how to introduce and implement positive practices into workplaces. He shares examples of handling situations through conventional strategy and positive practices.

While many organizations experience success with introducing and implementing positive practices, this is a transition that can be difficult to accomplish. We have a natural fear and to flourish, we need to overcome the conventional mind map. However, the most effective outcomes are the result of finding a balance of conventional methods and positive practices. 

Robert shares the four questions to ask to transform yourself into a positive state and get different results than you have in the past: 

  1. What results to I want to create?
  2. Am I internally directed?
  3. Am I other-focused?
  4. Am I externally open?

This interview was produced in partnership with the Canadian Positive Psychology Association and the 3rd Canadian Conference on Positive Psychology.

Robert’s Blog: https://thepositiveorganization.wordpress.com/

You’ll Learn

  • [2:26] - Assumptions of conventional social science and alternatives to those assumptions
  • [4:29] - Robert shares an example of the destruction of the culture of an organization through conventional decision-making and strategy.
  • [5:55] - To contrast the previous story, Robert shares an example of handling down-sizing with positive practices.
  • [7:59] - Flourishing means overcoming natural fear
  • [9:41] - Positive practices are an addition, not a replacement to the conventional mind map.
  • [10:44] - Finding a balance with conventional methods and positive practices
  • [12:50] - Robert shares his thoughts on how to introduce and implement these ideas.
  • [16:21] - Contributive goals help people take risks
  • [17:45] - Robert talks about the transformation he sees in his workshops.
  • [18:33] - The lightning round with Robert Quinn. 

Resources:

“The Positive Organization: Breaking Free from Conventional Cultures, Constraints, and Beliefs” - Robert Quinn

Lift Exchange Tool

“Life on Purpose: How Living for What Matters Most Changes Everything” - Victor J Strecher

“The Path of Least Resistance: Learning to Become the Creative Force in Your Own Life” - Robert Fritz

Canadian Conference on Positive Psychology

Positive Business Conference

 

Thanks for listening!

Thanks so much for joining me again this week. If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post. 

Also please leave an honest review for the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.

And finally, don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

Special thanks to Robert for joining me this week. Until next time, take care!

Jun 15, 2016

David Cooperrider is renowned for his research in appreciative inquiry, a strength-based approach to creating change. David shares how appreciative inquiry is being used to build a better world.

David explains how organizations can align strengths in ways that make the system’s weaknesses irrelevant. He also shares how individuals and organizations can use this life-centric approach to go through the steps of this positive change model.

This interview was produced in partnership with the Canadian Positive Psychology Association and the 3rd Canadian Conference on Positive Psychology.

Tune in to hear more!

Website: www.davidcooperrider.com

Twitter: @Dlc6David

You’ll Learn:

  • [2:25] - David explains basics of appreciative inquiry
  • [4:52] - What you and your organization can gain from this positive change model
  • [5:27] - People don’t resist change. People love change.
  • [7:05] - Positive re-framing
  • [9:30] - Omni search and bringing in all of the strengths at every level
  • [10:50] - Strengthen the strengths
  • [12:28] - Imagining our future
  • [14:40] - Translate and improvise
  • [16:30] - Valuing progress moments
  • [18:02] - Embedding the change and reversing our mindset on change
  • [20:50] - The lightning round with David Cooperrider

Links from this discussion:

DavidCooperrider.com

The Spell of the Sensuous by David Abram

Canadian Conference On Positive Psychology

Thanks for Listening!

Thanks so much for joining me again this week. If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.

Also, please leave an honest review for the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings for the show, and I read each and every one of them. And finally, don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

Special thanks to David for joining me this week. Until next time, take care.

Jun 15, 2016

Caroline Adams Miller is one of the world’s leading positive psychology experts on goal-setting, accomplishment, grit, happiness, and success.

It seems everywhere you turn lately somebody is talking about grit. Is it really the key to success? Can you have too much? How do you cultivate it? So today, I turned to Caroline who is one of the world’s leading practitioners in grit to see what all the fuss is about.

In this interview you’ll hear why she believes grit has to be authentic and how to avoid the downsides of “stupid grit”, “selfie grit” and “faux grit”. She explains how organizations can build grit through embedding it and why organization leaders must model grit in workplaces.

This interview was produced in partnership with the Canadian Positive Psychology Association and the 3rd Canadian Conference on Positive Psychology.

Tune in to hear more!

Website: www.carolinemiller.com

Twitter: @CarolineMCoach

You’ll Learn

  • [2:43] - Caroline defines “authentic grit”
  • [3:22] - Caroline shares what she considers to be “stupid grit”
  • [5:45] – Caroline explains “selfie grit” and why grit paragons all have humility
  • [7:54] - Caroline explains “faux grit” and how this gets us into trouble
  • [10:11] - How to build and embed grit
  • [12:38] – Why leaders must have grit
  • [15:18] - Should every workplace cultivate grit?
  • [18:54] - The lightning round with Caroline Adams Miller

Your Resources:

Thanks For Listening!

Thanks so much for joining me again this week. If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of the post.

Also, please leave an honest review for the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.

And finally, don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

Special thanks to Caroline for joining me this week. Until next time, take care

Jun 15, 2016

Kim Cameron is one of the top 10 scholars in organizational sciences. Kim recently spoke at the Canadian Conference on Positive Psychology and he talks with us about positive and relational energy.

Positive energy and relational energy has a tremendous positive impact on individuals and organizations. So today, I talk with Kim Cameron, a leading scholar on these topics and positive psychology.

In this interview, you will hear how the positive impact of positive energy and relational energy are measurable down to the cellular level. Kim also shares that contribution is more powerful than achievement and he provides examples from the University of Michigan. Some employees may perceive positive practices as manipulation and Kim shares why he believes this opposition will not become more common.

This interview was produced in partnership with the Canadian Positive Psychology Association and the 3rd Canadian Conference on Positive Psychology.

Tune in to hear more!

Kim Cameron’s Website: http://webuser.bus.umich.edu/cameronk/?_ga=1.99712030.1617036109.1465915693

You’ll Learn

  • [2:20] - People with positive energy and relational energy are four times more likely to succeed.
  • [5:53] - The characteristics of positively energizing leaders.
  • [7:45] - The heliotropic effect and how to unleash it.
  • [9:22] - Contribution goals trump achievement goals
  • [12:58] - Kim talks about the culture of abundance and its positive impact on organizations.
  • [14:34] - The notion of happiness and well-being can be used as a manipulation.
  • [16:18] - Positive practices show results at the cellular level.
  • [18:31] - The lightning round with Kim Cameron

Your Resources:

 

Thanks for listening!

Thanks so much for joining me again this week. If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of the post.

Also, please leave an honest review for Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.

And finally, don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

Special thanks to Caroline for joining me this week. Until next time, take care!

Jun 15, 2016

Thank you for joining me for the very first episode of Making Positive Psychology Work. Every week, I’ll be interviewing the world’s leading researchers and practitioners who applying the evidence-based practices of positive psychology and neuroscience in workplaces to bring out the best in people. You see I believe that by uncovering tested, practical ways to help people move from functioning to flourishing at work, together we’ll be able to better navigate the incredible challenges and opportunities our world faces.

Website: www.michellemcquaid.com

Twitter: @chellemcquaid

When you watch the ongoing economic, environmental, social and political challenges current reverberating around our world, can make it hard to feel hopeful about our future. But when you start diving into the growing body of research on the power of positive psychology and positive organizational scholarship approaches to improve people’s wellbeing, to leverage their strengths, to cultivate compassion, to motivate ourselves by the positive difference we can each make, and to harness our grit to accomplish the things that matter most, it’s impossible to deny the individual and collective potential we truly have at our fingertips.

My goal on this podcast is to make this as easy, enjoyable and effective as possible for you. In this podcast, you’ll hear how.

Tune in to hear more!

You’ll Learn

  • [1:40] – Who will join us each week on the podcast.
  • [2:11] – How we’ll help you to become intelligent users of positive psychology, positive organizational scholarship and neuroscience research in your own life and in our workplaces.
  • [2:53] – Why it’s so important to play with these ideas and not just accept the research at face value.
  • [3:18] – How listening to this podcast can you save you time and money by freely and succinctly bringing your the world’s best researchers and practitioners every week.
  • [3.41] – Who am I to take you on this journey.

Your Resources:

Thanks for listening!

Thanks so much for joining me. If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of the post.

Also, please leave an honest review for Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.

And finally, don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

Until next time, take care.

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