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Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast

If you believe as I do that by uncovering tested, practical ways to help people move from functioning to flourishing at work, we can better navigate the incredible challenges and opportunities our world faces, then this podcast is for you. My goal each week is to give you access to the world’ leading positive psychology, positive organizational scholarship and neuroscience researchers and practitioners to explore their latest research findings on how you can improve wellbeing, develop strengths, nurture positive relationships, make work meaningful and cultivate the grit to accomplish what matters most. If you want evidence-based approaches to bringing out the best in yourself and others at work, then consider this podcast your step-by-step guide.
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Aug 25, 2017

Dr. Ryan Niemiec is a leading figure in the education, research, and practice of character strengths that are found in all human beings. He is Education Director of the VIA Institute on Character, a global, nonprofit organization.  He is an award-winning psychologist and adjunct professor at Xavier University, an annual instructor at The University of Pennsylvania.  He is a frequent speaker and workshop leader on positive psychology topics around the world. His latest book is Character Strengths Interventions: A Field Guide for Practitioners.

In this conversation, you will hear Ryan talk about how your character strengths are the fuel that makes our other strengths rise. Ryan talks about ways to identify and develop your strengths at work each day and the behavioral traps that can bring your strengths unstuck.

Connect with Ryan:

Websites:  http://www.ryanniemiec.com and http://viacharacter.org

You’ll Learn:

  • [02:12] - Ryan starts the conversation by explaining what a strength is.
  • [03:36] - Over 5 million people have measured their strengths by using the wonderful VIA Character Survey.
  • [04:24] - Ryan talks about The Power Zone of Strengths.
  • [07:35] - Ryan explains what he has found around subsets of our character strengths.  
  • [10:39] - Ryan discusses the idea of taking middle strengths and moving them up.  
  • [14:38] - Ryan selects three of his favorite strengths and interventions from his latest book.  He talks about subtract signature strength, appreciation, and alignment.
  • [21:00] - In his book, Ryan shares behavioral traps around developing our strengths.  He shares some words of caution. He talks about trying to immediately apply a concept and the need to be flexible in this work.
  • [23:35] - The Lightning Round with Ryan Niemiec.

Your Resources:

Thanks for listening!

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.  

Please leave an honest review for the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.  And don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

You can also listen to all the episodes of Making Positive Psychology Work streamed directly to your smartphone or iPad through stitcher. No need for downloading or syncing.

Until next time, take care! Thanks for joining us today Ryan!

Aug 18, 2017

Elise Morris is a positive psychology practitioner, and Director of People and Culture at Swisse Wellness, who were recently recognized by the University of Michigan's Ross School of Business as a global example of excellence for their work in whole person wellness.  Elise believes wholeheartedly that other people matter, and when we live and lead from this perspective, we can unlock ours and others ability to thrive and flourish.  . 

Would you like to implement a comprehensive wellbeing program to take people from functioning to flourishing in your organization?  Elise explains the programs and initiatives Swisse Wellness are implementing as part of their whole person wellness program. These come under three pillars – movement, nutrition and mindfulness.  Hear about the successes, and her hopes for further integrating the program within the organization.

Connect with Elise Morris: 

Website - StillNorth.com.au

You’ll Learn:

  • [02:08] - Elise shares why Swiss Wellness won an award at the 2017 Positive Business Project Conference.
  • [04:40] - Elise explains the growing business case to improve wellbeing at work.
  • [06:56] - Elise talks about getting past our own biases and understanding where someone else is coming from.
  • [08:23] - Elise shares the tools and practices in their program.
  • [10:20] - Elise explains how they are considering how to take a more systems perspective.
  • [13:04] - Elise discusses performance and contribution.
  • [14:17] - Elise shares how they measure the impact of their program.
  • [15:49] - Elise talks about gender and buy-in with the practices.
  • [17:31] - Elise shares a challenge they have faced with rolling out this program.
  • [19:18] - Elise provides advice to others who are thinking about rolling out a similar program.
  • [20:23] - Elise talks about scaling this program for working across multiple markets.
  • [22:55] - The Lightning Round with Elise Morris

Your Resources:

Thanks for listening!

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.  

Please leave an honest review for the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.  And don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

You can also listen to all the episodes of Making Positive Psychology Work streamed directly to your smartphone or iPad through Stitcher.

No need for downloading or syncing.

Until next time, take care!

Aug 11, 2017

Amy Blankson is one of the world’s leading experts on the connection between positive psychology and technology. Amy is the only person to be named “a point of light” by two Presidents for creating a movement to activate positive culture change. She has worked with government agencies and large companies to help foster a sense of well-being in the digital era.  

In this conversation, you will hear Amy talk about how technology is  positively and negatively impacting our wellbeing at work. Amy explains how our obsession with smart phones is wearing us out, how to be intelligent and deliberate in the way we use devices and the wearable technology that can actually help to improve our wellbeing.   

Connect with Amy Blankson: 

You’ll Learn: 

  • [02:01] - Amy explains why she believes that technology is the biggest disruptor of happiness in human history. 
  • [04:13] - Amy shares her thoughts where technology is taking us when considering the way we work and our wellbeing.   
  • [06:49] - Amy encourages us to consider our intentions when it comes to technology.   
  • [09:30] - Amy talks about an experiment she is currently working on, which involves the frequency of checking an email inbox.  
  • [11:39] - Amy shares some advice on how to set other people’s expectations based on our intentions.  
  • [14:04] - Amy provides us with some statistics on our technology use and its impact on our productivity.  
  • [16:30] - Amy talks about how this conversation may change the expectations managers put on employees. 
  • [19:15] - Amy explains what digital citizenship means and the practices we need to use to role model good behavior.  
  • [21:16] - Amy talks about her current favorite wearable, The Muse Headband. 
  • [23:03] - The Lightning Round with Amy Blankson 

Your Resources: 

Thanks for listening! 

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.   

Please leave an honest review for the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.  And don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free! 

You can also listen to all the episodes of Making Positive Psychology Work streamed directly to your smartphone or iPad through stitcher. No need for downloading or syncing. 

Until next time, take care!  

Aug 4, 2017

Jon Berghoff is a co-founder and managing partner of The Flourishing Leadership Institute. He has designed and facilitated whole system change efforts through large group collaborative summits for businesses and institutions of all sizes.  His work on appreciative leadership, emotionally intelligent negotiating, and influence has taken him to Australia, Japan, the UK, and Australia. Jon is the official design and facilitation partner for the 4th Global Forum for Business as an Agent of Well Benefit.

In this conversation, you will hear Jon share his knowledge and experience in appreciative inquiry.  He discusses the idea of an appreciative inquiry summit and provides some example of productive summits.  Jon explains how to bring appreciative inquiry into our daily lives and small groups, as well as larger groups and organizations.  Jon shares how micro moments can influence macro movements.

Connect with Jon Berghoff:

Website - http://lead2flourish.com
Jon Berghoff Ted Talk

You’ll Learn:

  • [01:54] - Jon shares what he has discovered unleashes our ability to come alive, be at our best, play to our strengths, innovate from everywhere, and deepen our sense of purpose.
  • [02:42] - Jon describes what an appreciative inquiry summit is.
  • [03:42] - Jon shares his definition of appreciative inquiry.
  • [04:53] - Jon provides an example of an appreciative inquiry summit.
  • [09:50] - Jon talks about his work with the city of Cleveland.  
  • [12:58] - Jon shares his thoughts on when an appreciative inquiry summit is an appropriate tool.
  • [19:43] - Jon explains why he views appreciative inquiry as a tool.
  • [25:19] - The Lightning Round with Jon Berghoff.

Your Resources:

Thanks for listening!

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.  

Please leave an honest review for the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.  And don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

You can also listen to all the episodes of Making Positive Psychology Work streamed directly to your smartphone or iPad through stitcher. No need for downloading or syncing.

Special thanks to Jon for joining us this week. Until next time, take care!

Jul 28, 2017

Adam Grant  is a leading expert on how we can find motivation and meaning, and live more generous and creative lives. He has been recognized as one of the world’s 25 most influential management thinkers, is the author of three New York Times best-selling books, and his TED Talks have been viewed more than 8-million times.

In this conversation, you will hear Adam explain how our beliefs about our relationships at work shape the success we are able to achieve.  Adam walks us through his research on givers, takers and matchers and what organizations can do to cultivate giving cultures.  He also explains how to deal with takers, the value of disagreeable givers and the small practices you can try to be an effective giver.

 

Connect with Adam Grant:

Website - http://AdamGrant.net

You’ll Learn:

 

  • [02:02] - Adam shares what advice he gives the organizations on how to lead and manage people better.
  • [03:23] - Adam talks about the importance of organization rewarding the right people through measuring others-focused behaviors and results.  
  • [05:51] - Adam shares his thoughts on dealing with “takers” in an organization and bringing out the positive qualities in these individuals.
  • [09:55] - Adam explains how to be a thoughtful giver within an organization.
  • [13:56] - Adam cites that doing 5-minute favors at work raises your job satisfaction. He goes on to explain that the receivers of those favors pay back at 278%.
  • [16:00] - Adam shares his thoughts on why self-compassion is important to help set boundaries and say “no” so we can be more effective givers.  
  • [17:46] - Adam explains how his opinions have changed on the topic of needing takers in an organization.
  • [20:56] - Adam recently found that the most important driver of engagement at work was pride in the company.
  • [23:31] - The Lightning Round with Adam Grant.

Your Resources:

Thanks for listening!

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.  

Please leave an honest review for the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.  And don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

You can also listen to all the episodes of Making Positive Psychology Work streamed directly to your smartphone or iPad through stitcher. No need for downloading or syncing.

Special thanks to Adam for joining us this week. Until next time, take care!

 

Jul 21, 2017

Shane was one of the world's leading researchers on hope and was also a senior scientist and research director at The Clifton Strengths Institute, where he explored the links between hope, strengths development, academic success, and overall well-being. For me, one of the most magical moments of this year’s World Congress on Positive Psychology was the chance to honor, savor, and build upon the research of Dr. Shane Lopez. I first met Shane at a World Congress years ago, and he was generous enough to allow me to interview him on several occasions.

To give you a chance to savor Shane’s insight, I thought you might enjoy this interview, which was recorded prior to his death.  Shane explains how using your strengths - those things you are good at and enjoy doing -  can help you be more engaged in what you do each day at work.  And when managers shift their thinking to a more strengths based approach that encourages each person to do what they do best they can make a big difference in engagement, profitability and productivity. Learn how to identify your strengths, how these can change over time, and what you can do to develop yours and others strengths.

You’ll Learn:

  • [01:45] - Shane shares his journey with strengths.  He talks about the work of Don Clifton at the University of Nebraska.
  • [04:00] - Shane explains what a talent is and how they grow into strengths.
  • [05:58] - In the workplace, we focus on weaknesses and try to “fix” those deficits rather than helping individuals find the right role.  Shane states how Don focused on talents on finding the roles for people based on those roles.
  • [07:20] - Shane shares that our talents are not static over time, but they don’t change a lot.  
  • [09:05] - Shane talks about Clifton Strengths Finder.  
  • [11:57] - Shane discusses the difference in strengths between entrepreneurs and those working within organizations.
  • [12:23] - If you have taken the strengths finder, Shane suggests you team up with someone else that has taken the assessment.
  • [13:49] - Shane talks about how a workplace can be transformed by catching people doing great work and providing quality feedback.
  • [15:57] - Shane talks about the 70% of disengagement in the workplace. Managers are not exempt from this lack of engagement.
  • [17:33] - Shane shares what managers do to help employees use their strengths at work.
  • [19:47] - Shane talks about the changes of strengths in college students and how that will eventually change the culture of workplaces.
  • [20:48] - Shane speaks about seeing strength development at the preschool level.

Your Resources:

Thanks for listening!

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post. 

Please leave an honest review for the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.  And don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

You can also listen to all the episodes of Making Positive Psychology Work streamed directly to your smartphone or iPad through stitcher. No need for downloading or syncing.

Vale Shane Lopez. Until next time, take care!

 

Jul 14, 2017

Richard Ryan is a professor at the Institute for Positive Psychology in Education at the Australian Catholic University. He is also a research professor of Psychology at the University of Rochester in New York. Rich is a clinical psychologist and co-developer of self-determination theory, one of the leading theories of human motivation. With over 300 papers and books in the areas of human motivation and personality and psychological well-being, he is among the most cited and influential researchers in psychology and social sciences.

In this conversation, Rich discusses how we can motivate ourselves and others at work and what we can do practically to cultivate autonomy, competence and relatedness.  He also explains the motivational pull of games and shares how elements within games can be used to improve wellbeing.

Connect with Rich Ryan:
Rich's Website

You’ll Learn:

  • [01:53] - Many organizations still struggle with motivating individuals to do their best work. Rich shares his findings in what actually works.
  • [02:41] - Rich explains why many organizations struggle with implementing strategies based on his findings.
  • [03:54] - Rich shares some of the factors his research finds are important for leaders to be able to enable in team members.
  • [05:10] - Rich explains why there are fundamental needs for flourishing.
  • [06:39] - Rich describes how neuropsychology is adding to his understanding of what motivates us.
  • [08:03] - Rich shares some outcomes leaders can expect if they make these changes.
  • [09:47] - Rich talks about how to teach leaders to be more autonomy supportive of their employees.
  • [10:53] - Rich shares that he has been inspired by the rise of the executive coaching culture.
  • [12:00] - Rich talks about the balance of incentives without undermining motivation.
  • [14:01] - Rich wrote a book on the motivational pull of games and he discusses the elements of games that can be utilized in workplaces. He also explains why gamification can be bad for organizations.
  • [18:04] - Rich talks about new health programs that use incentives to encourage behavior changes.
  • [20:19] - Rich talks about the importance of change in the process.
  • [21:26] - The Lightning Round with Rich Ryan

Your Resources:

Self-Determination Theory: Basic Psychological Needs in Motivation, Development, and Wellness - Richard Ryan and Edward Deci
Drive: The Surprising Truth About What Motivates Us - Daniel Pink
Glued to Games: How Video Games Draw Us In and Hold Us Spellbound - Scott Rigby and Richard Ryan
7 Minute Workout
Primed to Perform: How to Build the Highest Performing Cultures Through the Science of Total Motivation - Neel Doshi and Lindsay McGregor

Thanks for listening!

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post. 

Please leave an honest review for the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.  And don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

You can also listen to all the episodes of Making Positive Psychology Work streamed directly to your smartphone or iPad through stitcher. No need for downloading or syncing.

Special thanks to Rich for joining me this week. Until next time, take care!

Jul 7, 2017

Kristin Neff is an Associate Professor of Educational Psychology at the University of Texas at Austin. Kristin is a pioneer in the field of self-compassion research. In addition to writing numerous academic articles and book chapters on the topic, she’s the author of the book, Self-Compassion: The Proven Power of Being Kind to Yourself and creator of the CD series Self-Compassion Step by Step: The Proven Power of Being Kind to Yourself.  In conjunction with her colleague, Dr. Chris Germer, she’s developed an 8-week training program called Mindful Self-Compassion.

In this conversation, you will hear Kristin talk about self-compassion. She explains why our fear of failure and anxiety over performance are the two biggest reasons we don’t do as well as we should and shares how the simple practices of self-compassion can help us to feel more confident, motivated and resilient.

Connect with Kristin Neff:

Website: http://self-compassion.org/

You’ll Learn:

  • [01:58] – Kristin provides some cultural and biological reasons that self-criticism is often our first response when things don’t go to plan.
  • [04:06] – Kristin shares what her research shows to indicate that self-compassion is a better response in these moments.
  • [05:41] – Kristin describes some of the key skills people can learn through her program on self-compassion.
  • [07:26] – Kristin lists a few self-compassion practices that are ideal for work settings.
  • [09:17] – Kristin talks about the universal sound for comfort and compassion.
  • [13:49] – Kristin discusses the importance of self-compassion in the mix of other positive psychology practices.
  • [14:33] – Kristin shares some things organizations and leaders can do to encourage self-compassion practices.
  • [17:13] – Kristin explains “backdraft” and the types of people that may struggle with implementing self-compassion practices.
  • [19:20] – Kristin reports that women are less self-compassion, but more compassionate to others than men.
  • [20:58] – The Lightning Round with Kristin Neff

Your Resources:

Thanks for listening!

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.  

Also, please leave an honest review for the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.

You can also listen to all the episodes of Making Positive Psychology Work streamed directly to your smartphone or iPad through stitcher. No need for downloading or syncing.

And finally, don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

Special thanks to Kristin for joining me this week. Until next time, take care!

Jun 30, 2017

Duncan Young is the head of Workplace Health and Well-being at Lend Lease. Duncan is a passionate advocate for the positive impact of workplaces on our health.  

In this conversation, you will hear Duncan talk about the techniques he has helped implement in his organization to help leaders make well-being improvements. Leaders can make these changes based on the information they gather by wearing a heart-rate monitor, keeping the diary, and learning about improving the energy profile.  

Connect with Duncan Young:

LinkedIn - https://au.linkedin.com/in/duncan-young-6708389

You’ll Learn:

  • [01:40] - Duncan explains why improving well-being is such an important issue for Lend Lease and why leaders are becoming more aware of this importance.
  • [02:44] - Duncan believes we are becoming aware of the impact lifestyle have.
  • [03:20] - Duncan shares details on the programs he has created at Lend Lease to help leaders understand their well-being has on their performance.
  • [04:28] - Duncan describes the technology they are using to help leaders understand how their everyday choices impact their well-being.
  • [05:35] - Duncan explains how a diary is used in this process.
  • [06:51] - Duncan talks about the ideal balance of energy expenditure and energy renewal at work. 
  • [08:25] - Duncan shares what individuals can take away from the information from the programs he’s developed.
  • [09:18] - Duncan provides some examples of the techniques people can implement to improve their profile.
  • [11:25] - Duncan lists a few out-of-the-box ways to restore energy levels.
  • [12:55] - Duncan explains how collecting data can help individuals make changes.
  • [14:38] - Duncan believes it is important for leaders to share this information and these techniques with employees.
  • [16:31] - Duncan talks about how small changes can become embedded in the company culture and give individuals the support to improve well-being.  
  • [17:52] - Duncan shares one caution for organizations wanting to improve well-being.
  • [18:34] - The Lightning Round with Duncan Young.

Your Resources:

Thanks for listening!

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.  

Also, please leave an honest review for the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.

And finally, don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

Special thanks to Duncan for joining me this week. Until next time, take care!

Jun 23, 2017

Dr. Alia Crum is an Assistant Professor of Psychology at Stanford University. Her award-winning research focuses on how changes in our subjective mindsets can alter our objective reality through behavioral, psychological, and physiological mechanisms. She is an organizational training and consultant on mindset change and stress management.

A mindset is a lens in which you view the world. The mindsets we choose play a dramatic role in shaping our physiology and behavior.  In this conversation, you will hear Alia discuss some of her fascinating studies and the findings from those studies. She specifically talks about mindset with stress, exercise, and food indulgence.

Connect with Alia Crum:

Website: http://mbl.stanford.edu

You’ll Learn:

  • [01:40] - Alia sets the framework for this conversation by explaining what a mindset is and how they work.
  • [02:31] - Alia lists some of the things that shape our mindset and why they shape the way we feel and act.  
  • [04:15] - Alia talks about some of her research and findings. She discusses a mindset intervention she did with hotel room attendants in regards to exercise. Another study was on food indulgence.
  • [07:57] - Alia describes her studies on stress and mindset.
  • [11:23] - Alia talks about sharing the full truth of stress, then talking about the power of mindset and a 3-step approach.  She shares what this 3-step approach is.
  • [14:06] - Alia shares the overall purpose of a mindset shift.
  • [15:07] - Alia explains that mindsets on gender can impact organizations.
  • [16:04] - Alia describes how organizations can become more aware of mindsets.  
  • [17:43] - Alia shares what is currently on her mind in regards to mindsets.
  • [19:24] - The Lightning Round with Alia Crum.

Your Resources:

Thanks for listening!

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.  

Also, please leave an honest review for the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.

You can also listen to all the episodes of Making Positive Psychology Work streamed directly to your smartphone or iPad through stitcher. No need for downloading or syncing.

And finally, don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

Special thanks to Alia for joining me this week. Until next time, take care!

Jun 19, 2017

Barry Schwartz is an Emeritus Professor of Psychology at Swarthmore College and a visiting professor at the Haas School of Business at Berkeley. Barry spent 40 years thinking and writing about the interaction between economics and morality. He has written several best-selling books, including The Paradox of Choice and Why We Work. Barry’s Ted Talks have been viewed by more than 14 million people.

When it comes to making decisions do you sometimes feel overwhelmed by the number of choices you have? It seems that while choice is good for your wellbeing, more choice isn’t necessarily better – there’s a tipping point where too many options can paralyze you and lead to regrets.  Hear how adapting a ‘good enough’ strategy, rather than searching for the ultimate best option, can help you navigate more successfully through your choices and improve your wellbeing and how these practices can be applied in workplaces.

Connect with Barry Schwartz:

Website – http://www.swarthmore.edu/profile/barry-schwartz

Ted Talks – https://www.ted.com/speakers/barry_schwartz

You’ll Learn:

  • [01:58] – Barry shares the dogma he believes that guides many western industrialized societies that is undermining our wellbeing.
  • [03:38] – Barry talks about how having too many choices can lead to bad decisions and regrets.
  • [04:54] – Barry explains the difference between maximizing and satisficing strategies when it comes to your choices.
  • [06:48] – Barry shares how organizations with a culture of ‘good enough’ are likely to result in more satisfied, productive and effective employees.
  • [10:20] – Barry talks about growth mindset and clarifies that having high standards and an end-result to aim for can keep you motivated on the journey.
  • [11:41] – Barry shares his thoughts on balancing your inner-critic and self-compassion.
  • [13:50] – Barry explains his researcher with Adam Grant on the “The Inverted U” and why you can have too much of a good thing when it comes to improving your wellbeing.
  • [18:50] – Barry believes that it’s possible for every worker at every company to find meaning and fulfillment from their jobs and explains how.
  • [20:36] – The Lightning Round with Barry Schwartz

Your Resources:

Thanks for listening!

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.

Also, please leave an honest review for the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.

You can also listen to all the episodes of Making Positive Psychology Work streamed directly to your smartphone or iPad through stitcher. No need for downloading or syncing.

And finally, don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

Special thanks to Barry for joining me this week. Until next time, take care!

Jun 9, 2017

Emily Esfahani Smith is a graduate of Master of Applied Positive Psychology program at the University of Pennsylvania, where she now serves as an instructor.  Emily draws on psychology, philosophy, and literature to research and writes about the human experience.  She is the author of the best-selling book, The Power of Meaning: Crafting a Life That Matters.  

Research shows that people who value happiness in the way our culture encourages us to do are left feeling empty and unhappy. What brings true happiness and satisfaction is meaning.  We all want to know that our lives matter.  In this conversation, you will hear Emily share the four pillars of meaning and the small, practical ways you can find meaning in your work no matter what your job description or your boss says. 

Connect with Emily Esfahani Smith:

Website – http://emilyesfahanismith.com

Twitter – @EmEsfahaniSmith

You’ll Learn:

  • [01:44] – Emily explains why meaning matters when looking at wellbeing.  
  • [03:41] – Emily shares what her research shows might make life more meaningful.
  • [06:35] – While people are reporting their sense of loneliness is escalating, Emily provides some examples of how we can increase our sense of belonging at work.
  • [09:16] – Emily says that if we don’t feel a sense of belonging, it may be up to us to reach out and connect with others and explains how we can do this at work.
  • [10:03] – Emily puts “purpose” into context and shares how we can find purpose in our jobs.
  • [12:45] – Emily explains how storytelling provides a path to meaning.
  • [15:30] – Emily discusses Laura King’s exercise with our lost selves and how that might help us with storytelling.
  • [17:50] – Emily talks about The Moth and how it creates an environment for storytelling.
  • [18:56] – When looking at transcendence, Emily shares why aura is important to our sense of meaning.
  • [20:53] – The Lightning Round with Emily Esfahani Smith.

Your Resources:

Thanks for listening!

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.  

Also, please leave an honest review for the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.

You can also listen to all the episodes of Making Positive Psychology Work streamed directly to your smartphone or iPad through stitcher. No need for downloading or syncing.

 And finally, don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

Special thanks to Emily for joining me this week. Until next time, take care!

Jun 2, 2017

Paige Williams is a Positive Change Solutionary who uses the science of wellbeing to create sustainable positive change within individuals and organizations.  She is a lecturer with The Center for Positive Psychology at the University of Melbourne.

In this conversation, you will hear Paige share her research on how an Inside-Out-Outside-In approach to improving wellbeing can help to improve work happiness in organizations.  Paige explains how achieving successful and sustainable change relies on the dynamic interplay been the individual and the system that they are part of and the practical strategies organizations can use to create upward and sustainable spirals of wellbeing.

Connect with Paige Williams:

You’ll Learn:

  • [01:48] –  Paige published a paper, Inside-Out-Outside-In: A Dual Approach Model To Developing Work Happiness.  She explains this approach to wellbeing in workplaces.
  • [04:52] – Paige explains how workplaces can leverage the factors that help us to improve from the inside out.
  • [05:59] – Paige lists the factors that make up psychological capital and how they can influence outside in elements.
  • [07:42] – Paige describes how a three-day positive psychology training intervention helped build psychological capital in people.
  • [10:43] – Paige talks about using Kim Cameron’s Positive Practices framework to help organizations build more positive cultures.
  • [12:15] – Paige lists the insights she shares with leaders who are looking to improve workplace wellbeing.
  • [14:44] – Paige talks about helping organizations and individuals implement and sustain these wellbeing practices.  
  • [16:05] – Paige talks about how leaders can provide people with opportunities to reinforce the positive training they’ve received.
  • [17:02] – Paige discusses what she would like to research in the future.
  • [19:11] – The Lightning Round with Paige Williams

Your Resources:

Thanks for listening!

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.  

Also, please leave an honest review for the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.

You can also listen to all the episodes of Making Positive Psychology Work streamed directly to your smartphone or iPad through stitcher. No need for downloading or syncing.

And finally, don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

Special thanks to Paige for joining me this week. Until next time, take care!

May 26, 2017

Christine Porath is an associate professor at the School of Business at Georgetown University.  Christine’s research focuses on leadership, organizational culture, the effects of bad behavior in workplaces, and how organizations can create a more positive environment where people can thrive. She recently released a new book, Mastering Civility: A Manifesto for the Workplace.

How often does someone’s rude or insensitive behavior zap your energy and motivation? Unfortunately it seems that incivility is on the rise in our workplaces.  It can undermine your work performance, and your mental and physical wellbeing. Listen to Christine share strategies on buffering the negative effects of incivility and building more civil organizations.

Connect with Christine Porath:

You’ll Learn:

  • [01:48] – Christine defines “incivility” and says that it has become more prevalent in workplaces.  
  • [04:44] – Christine explains that the number one thing driving incivility is stress and feeling overwhelmed. She also talks about technology’s role in civility.
  • [06:20] – Christine describes the cost to employees and workplaces from tolerating incivility.  
  • [08:13] – Christine shares some tips on how to handle incivility.  
  • [11:04] – Christine talks about why wellbeing is the best antidote to incivility.
  • [12:30] – Christine asks, “Who do you want to be?”  She explains why answering this question each day may determine our success.
  • [14:36] – The Cycle to Civility is a four step process for organizations to become more civil places.
  • [18:34] – Christine talks about where civility can go awry.
  • [20:13] – There are simple techniques to improve our civility. Christine shares some of these.
  • [23:21] – The Lightning Round with Christine Porath.

Your Resources:

Thanks for listening!

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.  

Also, please leave an honest review for the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.

You can also listen to all the episodes of Making Positive Psychology Work streamed directly to your smartphone or iPad through stitcher. No need for downloading or syncing.

And finally, don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

Special thanks to Christine for joining me this week. Until next time, take care!

May 19, 2017

Ellen Langer is a Harvard psychology professor and the director of the Langer Mindfulness Institute.  She has been described as “The Mother of Mindfulness” and has authored 11 books and more than 200 articles. Her work has influenced two decades of research in positive psychology.  

In this conversation, you will hear Ellen share why mindfulness doesn’t require you to sit in hours of meditation.  She explains the benefits she has found over 40 years of research for the practice of mindfulness in workplaces and what leaders can do practically to be more mindful and how they can help the people they lead to do the same. 

Connect with Ellen Langer:

Websites:

You’ll Learn:

  • [01:30] – Ellen explains why “mindfulness” as the process of noticing new things.
  • [02:15] – Ellen lists some benefits of mindfulness in workplaces.
  • [06:07] – Ellen talks about the practical ways leads can be more mindful.  
  • [08:35] – Ellen provides an example of a mindful company that turned a failed product into a successful product.
  • [11:58] – Ellen shares how we can approach the same task differently, depending on our perception of that task and the impact this can have on our performance.
  • [13:53] – Ellen explains the simple changes we can each make to be more mindful.
  • [18:15] – Ellen shares the benefits she’s found of having happier workplaces
  • [18:55] – Ellen talks about the impact mindfulness can have on our health.

Your Resources:

Thanks for listening!

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.  

Also, please leave an honest review for the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.

You can also listen to all the episodes of Making Positive Psychology Work streamed directly to your smartphone or iPad through stitcher. No need for downloading or syncing.

And finally, don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

Special thanks to Ellen for joining me this week. Until next time, take care!

May 12, 2017

Roy Baumeister is one of the world’s most prolific and influential psychologists. He has published well over 500 scientific articles and more than 30 books. In 2013, he received the highest award given by the Association for Psychological Science, the William James Fellow Award. He is a professor of Psychology at Florida State University.  

Wish you had more willpower to stick to your resolutions?  Roy’s early studies found that generally self-control works like a muscle – it gets tired when you exercise it, but if you exercise it a lot, it seems to get stronger. Recently he is finding a link between your willpower and your body’s energy system, so when you are feeling tired, hungry, or run down your levels of self-control may be lower. Hear how self-control can help you manage the challenges of life.

Connect with Roy Baumeister:

Website: http://www.roybaumeister.com/

You’ll Learn:

  • [01:45] – Roy explains why self-control seems more important and powerful than self-esteem.
  • [04:30] – Roy describes his findings on how self-control works.
  • [07:01] – Roy comments on a recent study by Carol Dweck where if you believe you have unlimited willpower you will be less likely to deplete it.
  • [09:40] – Roy’s current research is finding that when your willpower is depleted you’re more likely to jump to conclusions.
  • [14:08] – Roy talks about self-defeating behavior, specifically in situations with short-term gain and long-term loss.
  • [17:36] – Roy explains that people with good self-control generally have fewer stresses and problems.
  • [19:35] – Roy shares some insights on when and how to make positive changes in your life.
  • [20:17] – The Lightning Round with Roy Baumeister

Your Resources:

Thanks for listening!

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.  

Also, please leave an honest review for the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.

You can also listen to all the episodes of Making Positive Psychology Work streamed directly to your smartphone or iPad through stitcher. No need for downloading or syncing.

And finally, don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

Special thanks to Roy for joining me this week. Until next time, take care!

May 5, 2017

Garry Davis’ corporate career has included more than a decade in executive HR and OD roles in public and private sectors.  His work in leadership development and applied positive psychology has been recognized through various awards.  

In this conversation, you’ll hear Garry share his award-winning approach to introducing positive leadership into organizations and his tips for embedding these behaviors to create lasting changes.  Garry also shares the surprising truths he learned about organizational cynics and how to manage them through the change process.

Connect with Garry Davis:

Website - thestylewisegroup.com

  • [01:47] – Garry shares takeaways from his award-winning work.  He explains the importance of context.  
  • [05:13] – Garry explains why a one-size fits all approach may not work when considering smaller teams within an organization.  There can be different cultures with these teams.
  • [07:18] – Garry shares his award-winning case study for the introduction of positive leadership into a workplace.
  • [09:19] – After the conversation is changed, the behaviors need to be embedded. This takes time and using this company as an example, Garry talks about the time-frame to reach sustainability.
  • [13:48] – Garry talks about early adopters and laggers and the impact they can have on implementing these practices.  He draws a parallel to the movie, Toy Story.  
  • [18:03] – Garry shares what the strategy should be when it comes to the “terrorists” that don’t immediately buy in.
  • [19:56] – Garry shares that there may be companies that are not ready for positive psychology practices.
  • [21:10] – The Lightning Round with Garry Davis.

Your Resources:

Thanks for listening!

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.  

Also, please leave an honest review for the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.

You can also listen to all the episodes of Making Positive Psychology Work streamed directly to your smartphone or iPad through stitcher. No need for downloading or syncing.

And finally, don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

Special thanks to Garry for joining me this week. Until next time, take care!

Apr 28, 2017

Sue Ashford is a professor in management and organization at the University of Michigan.  Her research interests include leader effectiveness and development, issue selling, self-management and feedback processes in organizations.  

Are you keen to step up to a leadership role but worried you aren’t quite ready?  Sue suggests that everyone has leadership potential, and you learn leadership mostly from experience.  But if you’re racing through your experiences mindlessly, you could be missing out on a lot of learning.  By mindfully engaging in your experiences, and being open to growing, developing your skills and getting feedback you can be more effective at learning leadership skills.

Connect with Sue Ashford:

Sue’s Website

You’ll Learn:

  • [01:42] – Sue will be presenting at the upcoming Positive Business Conference on ‘Control Your Own Destiny: Leadership Development through Mindful Engagement.’
  • [03:41] – Sue discusses the leadership is part skill, part mindset, and in part risk.
  • [05:32] – Sue defines ‘mindful engagement’ as a set of practices that allow you to learn more from the experiences you’re in.
  • [07:53] – Sue explains that it’s not possible to be mindful every moment of every day, but she says that you can be mindful in certain experiences.
  • [12:45] – Sue says that experimentation with different approaches allows you to find what works and doesn’t work.
  • [14:08] – Both anxiety and too much positivity can prevent learning. Emotion regulation can keep your emotions in a middle ground.
  • [15:48] –Referring to yourself in the third person has been found to help regulate emotions.
  • [17:14] – Sue talks about feedback-seeking and explains two strategies for gaining this information.
  • [20:20] – Sue explains why managers struggle with reflection.
  • [23:15] – The Lightning Round with Sue Ashford.

Your Resources:

Thanks for listening!

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.  

Also, please leave an honest review for the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.

You can also listen to all the episodes of Making Positive Psychology Work streamed directly to your smartphone or iPad through stitcher. No need for downloading or syncing.

And finally, don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

Special thanks to Sue for joining me this week. Until next time, take care!

Apr 21, 2017

Edwin Locke is the Dean’s Professor of Motivation and Leadership Emeritus at the University of Maryland.  He has published over 300 chapters and articles in professional journals on topics such as motivation, job satisfaction, incentives and the philosophy of science.  He is internationally known for his research on goal-setting.

Goals are critical in helping us create change in our lives, and yet most people struggle to stick with the goals they set. In this conversation, you’ll hear Ed explain the importance of setting goals and what his 35 years of research has discovered about setting effective goals and why SMART goals may not be as smart as you thought they were.

Connect with Edwin Locke:

Website: http://edwinlocke.com

You’ll Learn:

  • [01:37] – Ed explains that life is a goal-directed process and if we remain passive in setting goals it’s unlikely we will thrive.
  • [04:44] – Ed shares why people struggle with goals.  
  • [06:14] – Ed explains why we should be setting difficult goals for ourselves.
  • [07:08] – Ed describes the difference between a performance goal and a learning goal.  
  • [09:18] – Ed explains why SMART goals are incomplete.  
  • [10:55] – Ed shares the power of goal hierarchies and how to avoid goal conflicts.
  • [12:16] – Ed reminds us that it’s important to set goals for your own life and not setting goals to “show off” or goals based on someone else’s life.
  • [13:45] – Ed explains why “emotional intelligence” is over-rated for leadership.
  • [15:00] – The Lightning Round with Ed Locke

Your Resources:

Thanks for listening!

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.  

Also, please leave an honest review for the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.

You can also listen to all the episodes of Making Positive Psychology Work streamed directly to your smartphone or iPad through stitcher. No need for downloading or syncing.

And finally, don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

Special thanks to Ed for joining me this week. Until next time, take care!

Apr 14, 2017

Peggy Kern is a senior lecturer at the University of Melbourne’s Graduate School of Education in the Center for Positive Psychology. She has published over 50 peer-reviewed articles, and her research addresses the question, “Who flourishes, and why?”

Are we oversimplifying positive psychology?  While the field has made much progress over the last 15 years in helping people find ways to improve their wellbeing, however, at best interventions are only beneficial for some people, some of the time, and are far from a magic bullet for everyone in all situations.  Peggy suggests combining positive psychology’s focus on the individual with systems science to take into account the complex reality of our everyday contexts, could assist target interventions for individuals and the collective good.

Connect with Peggy Kern:

Website: http://peggykern.org

You’ll Learn:

  • [01:36] – Peggy has been working with a team of collaborators at Melbourne University that merges positive psychology with systems science to create positive systems science. She explains this merging of two interdisciplinary fields.
  • [04:49] – Peggy shares how systems science helps us figure out which positive psychology interventions will be helpful for specific outcomes at different times.
  • [11:10] – Peggy talks about how a systems map helps discover the relationships between things.
  • [13:12] – Systems are complex, dynamic and changing.
  • [15:13] – Peggy talks about how system science needs to be developed to help people flourish.
  • [17:23] – Peggy addresses how we can get organizations to see themselves as wellbeing systems.
  • [18:24] – To determine if a system is flourishing, measurement is necessary. Peggy talks about how the measurements work.
  • [21:08] – This is the early days of this type of thinking.  Peggy shares some resources for you to learn more, such as her blog.
  • [22:08] – The lightning round with Peggy Kern.

Your Resources:

Thanks for listening!

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.  

Also, please leave an honest review for the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.

You can also listen to all the episodes of Making Positive Psychology Work streamed directly to your smartphone or iPad through stitcher. No need for downloading or syncing.

And finally, don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

Special thanks to Peggy for joining me this week. Until next time, take care!

Apr 7, 2017

Professor Carol Dweck is widely regarded as one of the world’s leading researchers in the fields of personality, social psychology, and developmental psychology.  She has been elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the US Academy of Sciences and won nine lifetime achievement awards for her research.  Her work is used by organizations around the world to transform their cultures.

In this conversation, you will hear Carol talk about fixed and growth mindsets and how her research has found they can impact our performance at work.  She draws on her experience of helping organizations implement this type of mindset to share the small changes workplaces can make to cultivate growth mindset environments and where this can go wrong. 

Connect with Carol Dweck:

Website: http://mindsetonline.com/abouttheauthor/

You’ll Learn:

  • [02:10] – Carol explains the differences between fixed and growth mindsets, according to her research.
  • [04:56] – Carol shares how her studies have found that when there is a fixed mindset culture with an organization, there’s a lot of unethical and unhealthy behaviors because of the pursuit of outcomes.
  • [08:41] – Carol shares that innovation is coming out of growth mindset companies at a higher rate.
  • [10:22] – Carol’s recent article in the Harvard Business Review points out some of the misconceptions around growth mindsets in workplaces.  She explains what those misconceptions are.
  • [13:00] – Carol talks about how Microsoft are cultivating growth mindsets across their teams.
  • [19:32] – Carol explains why she believes self-compassion works well with a growth mindset.
  • [23:20] – Carol shares where the growth mindset and these strategies can go wrong and the importance of evaluation.
  • [24:16] – The Lightning Round with Carol Dweck.

Your Resources:

Thanks for listening!

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.  

Also, please leave an honest review for the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.

You can also listen to all the episodes of Making Positive Psychology Work streamed directly to your smartphone or iPad through stitcher. No need for downloading or syncing.

And finally, don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

Special thanks to Carol for joining me this week. Until next time, take care!

Mar 30, 2017

Dacher Keltner is a professor of psychology at UC Berkeley.  He is also the faculty director of The Greater Good Science Center. Dacher’s research focuses on the biological and evolutionary origins of compassion, love, beauty, power, social class, and inequality.

Do you run towards or away from having more power?  Often perceived as the need to manipulate, coerce or dominate others, it turns out that power is actually the ability to make a difference in the world by influencing others.   As a result power is not something to be taken, but given to us through the practices of empathy, kindness, generosity and gratitude.  The paradox however is that as our power grows from these practices, it often ends up disconnecting us from the very people we serve.  So how can we navigate the power paradox?

Connect with Dacher Keltner:

Website – http://psychology.berkeley.edu/people/dacher-keltner

You’ll Learn:

  • [01:35] – Dacher defines “power” as your capacity to influence other people.
  • [06:53] – Dacher explains that there are small things you can do to feel more powerful.
  • [09:05] – Dacher speaks about Adam Grant’s work on keeping your generosity right for the context.
  • [13:06] – Dacher explains how feeling powerful helps ignite your approach system by focusing on rewards, and when you’re not feeling powerful it trigger your inhibition system making you more aware of risks.
  • [15:05] – Dacher gives strategies to use to overcome the power paradox.
  • [23:32] – Dacher shares some thoughts on servant leadership.
  • [24:59] – Dacher explains what a future workplace looks like with shared power.
  • [26:40] – The Lightning Round with Dacher Keltner

Your Resources:

Thanks for listening!

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.  

Also, please leave an honest review for the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.

You can also listen to all the episodes of Making Positive Psychology Work streamed directly to your smartphone or iPad through stitcher. No need for downloading or syncing.

And finally, don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

Special thanks to Dacher for joining me this week. Until next time, take care!

Mar 23, 2017

Vanessa King is a board member of Action for Happiness, which is a UK-based not-for-profit that focuses on proactively building skills for psychological well-being and resilience. She’s also the architect of the Ten Keys to Happier Living. She joins me on this episode to talk about

In this episode, you will hear Vanessa’s Ten Keys to Happier Living, which form the acronym, GREAT DREAM.  Vanessa lists these ten keys and describes how they can bring about happier living.  She also talks about her program, Doing Well From the Inside Out and describes some of the success she’s seen through that program with building well-being in the workplace.  As technology changes the landscape of business and the future becomes more difficult to predict, getting back to the basics with well-being is more important than ever.

Connect with Vanessa King:

Action for Happiness
Ten Keys to Happier Living

You’ll Learn:

  • [01:45] - Vanessa explains that the Ten Keys to Happier Living are areas that we can take action in to help ourselves and other people be happier.  
  • [02:14] - GREAT DREAM is the acronym for these ten keys and Vanessa walks us through each of the keys.  
  • [05:40] - Vanessa talks about how people can stick with these shifts.  She explains that approaching these changes with an attitude of experimentation rather than lifestyle transformation where to set expectations.
  • [06:30] - Vanessa explains how sharing what you’re doing with other people can help create momentum through accountability.
  • [08:57] - The evidence is still out on these strategies, but Vanessa shares why she believes it’s possible long-term improvements in people’s well-being.
  • [11:40] - Vanessa emphasizes that these are ten keys to happier living, not ten keys to happiness.
  • [14:06] - Vanessa talks about her program, Doing Well From the Inside Out, which helps build well-being in the workplace.  
  • [15:47] - Vanessa shares a few stories about participants that went through this and other programs who experienced transformations.
  • [18:34] - Vanessa explains how she presents these strategies to businesses.  She shares there’s a need to think about organizations systemically.
  • [22:30] - Technology makes it difficult to predict the future in business.  Vanessa explains that requires us to get back to the basics with happy living.
  • [23:14] - The Lightning Round with Vanessa King.

Your Resources:

Thanks for listening!

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.  

Also, please leave an honest review for the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.

And finally, don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

Special thanks to Vanessa for joining me this week. Until next time, take care!

Mar 16, 2017

George Bonanno is professor of clinical psychology, Director of the Lost Trauma and Emotion Lab, and Director of The Resilience Center for Veterans and Families at Columbia University’s Teacher’s College. George’s research focuses on resilience in the fact of loss and traumatic events.  

Most of us have the natural tools to deal with extreme adversities in our lives. We cope well when extreme things happen to us.  To deal with the world around us, it takes a repertoire of behaviors.  Sometimes, this involves what George calls “coping ugly.”  Sometimes we might need to do something that doesn’t seem pretty but is reasonably effective.  

Connect with George Bonanno:

Website for Lost Trauma and Emotion Lab

You’ll Learn:

  • [01:55] - George will be presenting on loss, trauma, and resilience at the 5th World Congress on Positive Psychology.  He shares what he would like attendees to take home from his presentation. 
  • [03:45] - Media coverage ensures that we are aware of negative events.  The negative psychological consequences can be overcome, and eventually they go away.
  • [05:38] - George believes that resilience is natural and speaks to the fact that organizations are spending money on trying to enhance resilience.
  • [08:50] - George talks about the behaviors that make us cope better.   
  • [11:43] - “Coping ugly” is a phrase that George coined and he talks about what this means.  
  • [12:55] - George talks about how laughter can be an example of coping ugly.  
  • [14:20] - We all know the famous five stages of grief.  George states that these stages have been harmful to many people.  
  • [16:25] - The Lightning Round with George Bonanno

Your Resources:

Thanks for listening!

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.  

Also, please leave an honest review for the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.

And finally, don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

Special thanks to George for joining me this week. Until next time, take care!

Mar 9, 2017

Jeffrey Auerbach designs and delivers executive coaching and emotionally intelligent leadership programs.  He is the founder and President of The College of Executive Coaching, and past Vice President of the International Coach Federation Global Board of Directors.

In this conversation, you will hear Jeffrey talk about the well-being coaching he does with people in the workplace.  The biggest part of well-being is career well-being.  Jeffrey explains the importance of using strengths intelligently, and when one can’t rely on their strengths, doing the work to learn something new.  A weakness is sometimes a strength that is overplayed.  Jeffrey shares examples of coaching clients to demonstrate how these strategies can be implemented to make positive lifestyle changes.

Connect with Jeffrey Auerbach:

Website: http://executivecoachcollege.com
LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/jeffrey-e-auerbach-4155722b/

You’ll Learn:

  • [01:45] - Jeffrey will be presenting at the 5th World Congress on Positive Psychology. He’ll be talking about coaching for executive well-being.  He shares what he hopes attendees will take away from his presentation.  
  • [03:10] - Jeffrey shares how he coaches people to make changes to achieve well-being. He talks about a few practical applications people can implement.
  • [06:02] - Jeffrey talks about his new book, Positive Psychology in Coaching: Applying Science to Executive and Personal Coaching.
  • [07:59] - In his new book, Jeffrey talks about the dangers of over-using strengths.  In the world of leadership, people are hired and promotion because of their strengths.  But, when their careers fail, it’s because they rely on those strengths rather than being an agile learner.
  • [10:50] - Jeffrey shares how he coaches individuals to build on their strengths, but also be aware of and owning their limitations.  
  • [14:49] - Jeffrey cites Barbara Fredrickson’s work on the upward spiral of lifestyle change. He shares an example of how positive emotions can make lifestyle changes more likely.
  • [19:33] - Jeffrey talks about situations where well-being or strength-based coaching approaches are not appropriate.  
  • [21:07] - Group coaching situations are becoming more common. Jeffrey explains the reasons that he likes this approach.  
  • [25:08] - The Lightning Round with Jeffrey Auerbach

Your Resources:

Thanks for listening!

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.  

Also, please leave an honest review for the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.

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Special thanks to Jeffrey for joining me this week. Until next time, take care!

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