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Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast

If you believe as I do that by uncovering tested, practical ways to help people move from functioning to flourishing at work, we can better navigate the incredible challenges and opportunities our world faces, then this podcast is for you. My goal each week is to give you access to the world’ leading positive psychology, positive organizational scholarship and neuroscience researchers and practitioners to explore their latest research findings on how you can improve wellbeing, develop strengths, nurture positive relationships, make work meaningful and cultivate the grit to accomplish what matters most. If you want evidence-based approaches to bringing out the best in yourself and others at work, then consider this podcast your step-by-step guide.
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Mar 7, 2019

Today we're talking to Ron Fry, who's a professor of organizational behavior at the Weatherhead School of Management, Case Western Reserve University and former chairman of the Department of Organizational Behaviour, which has been consistently ranked one of the best in the world by the Financial Times.


With 11 books and over 45 articles and chapters, Ron is widely published in the areas of organizational development, appreciative inquiry, team building, change management, executive development, and the role and function of the CEO. He's a co-creator of the appreciative inquiry theory and method and continues to both apply and study the applications of AI in organizations all over the world.

In this episode, we discuss the simple questions that leaders can ask to help their people not just survive, but thrive, through organizational change experiences.

Connect with Ronald Fry: 

https://weatherhead.case.edu/faculty/ronald-fry

You’ll Learn:

  • [02:03] - Ron explains the three most important evidence-based insights every leader should know in order to implement change effectively in their workplace.
  • [04:57] - Ron shares why the questions we ask as leaders set changes in motion and how we can be more intentional about the questions we choose.
  • [09:14] - Ron outlines how creating opportunities to build new connections inside and outside of our organizations can power our change efforts.
  • [12:38] -  Ron explains how Appreciative Inquiry can build rapid trust in workplaces to help people work together to make their hopes for a change a reality.
  • [17:39] -  Ron outlines why stability and change have an interconnected and interdependent relationship, and why stability is as important for our success as change is in workplaces.
  • [24:07] -  Ron challenges our language about change in workplaces, and provides insights on why we need to think of change as a verb.
  • [27:23] -  Ron shares his tips for helping people to flourish through change in workplaces.
  • [31:18] -  Ron explains what it takes to build a positive institution and if this is possible in any workplace.
  • [32:07] - Ron completes the Lightning round.

Your Resources:

Thanks for listening! 

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.

Please leave an honest review for the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.  And don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

You can also listen to all the episodes of Making Positive Psychology Work streamed directly to your smartphone or iPad through stitcher. No need for downloading or syncing.

Until next time, take care!  Thank you Ron!

Mar 1, 2019

Today we're talking to Marie McLeod who fuses her qualifications in social work, adult education, and positive pschology with her extensive experience in community culture change. As the director of PoPsy, Marie makes positive psychology practical for individuals, organizations, and families, and as the founder of The Kindness Company, she uses kindness and compassion to cultivate community level wellbeing.

In this episode, we explore why and how community-level kindness can be an active ingredient to improve wellbeing to workplaces and the frameworks and practical steps we can take to make this a reality. 

Connect with Marie McLeod: 

You’ll Learn:

  • [03:07] - Marie explains why we need to think about improving people’s wellbeing, at an individual and at the community level in workplaces.
  • [06:40] - Marie shares how she’s been using the Community Kindness Challenge to help wellbeing be taught and caught in workplaces at the levels of me, we, and us.
  • [12:01] - Marie outlines why she’s finding kindness is the superpower of wellbeing approaches.
  • [16:10] -  Marie outlines the BEACON framework for improving wellbeing at a community level and explains how this build shared accountability for the wellbeing actions people choose to take.
  • [21:09] -  Marie offers some practical tips for improving kindness in workplaces.
  • [24:43] - Marie completes the Lightning round.

Your Resources:

Thanks for listening! 

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.

Please leave an honest review for the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.  And don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

You can also listen to all the episodes of Making Positive Psychology Work streamed directly to your smartphone or iPad through stitcher. No need for downloading or syncing.

Until next time, take care!  Thank you Marie!

Feb 21, 2019

Today we're talking to David Zeitler who uses the latest research in neuroscience, adult development, and leadership development to help people find ways to embrace the process of change and create transformations for themselves and others. After beginning as a psychotherapist and later spending two years as a lay monk, David went on to train executives and life coaches in the Immunity for Change Coaching Program at Mind Works with Harvard Professor Lisa Lahey and Robert Kegan.

In this episode, we explore why we might be immune to creating the changes we want for ourselves and our teams in workplaces and how a simple mapping exercise can help us overcome our resistance to change.

Connect with David Zeitler: 

You’ll Learn:

  • [02:25] - David explains that our mind has its own immune system that impacts our ability to create changes in our lives
  • [04:51] - David outlines the three plateaus in adult mental development that help us navigate work and life
  • [11:17] - David offers some tips for different ways to approach technical challenges and adaptive challenges when it comes to creating change
  • [14:19] -  David outlines how a psychological immunity map can be used to embrace adaptative challenges and make change a little easier
  • [19:47] -  David outlines some of the common worries that drain people’s commitment for change
  • [22:40] - David shares how behavior change experiments can help us test our worries and concerns about creating change
  • [27:58] - David completes the Lightning round.

Your Resources:

Thanks for listening! 

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.

Please leave an honest review for the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.  And don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

You can also listen to all the episodes of Making Positive Psychology Work streamed directly to your smartphone or iPad through stitcher. No need for downloading or syncing.

Until next time, take care!  Thank you David!

Feb 14, 2019

Today we're talking to Tegan Davies, who's a self-professed wellness geek, who has embedded positive psychology practices in the not-for-profit sector for over 10 years. Previously the head of Learning Development and Culture at Camp Quality, Australia's leading childhood cancer charity, Tegan is now the manager of operations at The Oranges Toolkit, a social enterprise dedicated to helping individuals and teams to realize their potential. She's also a board member for Action for Happiness in Australia, a business coach, and a qualified yoga teacher

In this episode, we discover how HR leaders can introduce and embed positive psychology approaches across workplaces, and the importance of establishing a common language, evidence-based practices, and wellbeing champions.

Connect with Tegan Davies: 

[free_product_purchase id="44348"]

You’ll Learn:

  • [02:21] - Tegan explains how Camp Quality – an Australian not for profit that helps children and their families who are impacted by cancer – has leveraged positive psychology approaches to look after the wellbeing of their staff in these sometimes very challenging circumstances.
  • [05:38] - Tegan shares how as an HR leader for Camp Quality she began finding ways to embed positive psychology approaches in the organization
  • [10:31] - Tegan provides some examples of the positive psychology approaches she has found works best in organizations.
  • [15:03] -  Tegan shares her tips on finding wellbeing champions in your workplace and how you can harness their commitment and strengths to improve wellbeing across your workplace.
  • [20:49] -  Tegan explains the importance of celebrating the successes of wellbeing journeys.
  • [23:53] - Tegan offers some cautions on taking a one-size fits all approach to organizational wellbeing programs.
  • [28:23] - Tegan outlines how common language and frameworks can help people to tailor their own wellbeing journey.
  • [30:50] - Tegan completes the Lightning round.

Your Resources:

Thanks for listening!

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.

Please leave an honest review for the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.  And don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

You can also listen to all the episodes of Making Positive Psychology Work streamed directly to your smartphone or iPad through stitcher. No need for downloading or syncing.

Until next time, take care!  Thank you Tegan!

Feb 7, 2019

Today we're talking to Nick Craig, who's the author of the newly published book Leading From Purpose, and President of the Core Leadership Institute where he guides executives at companies including Ben & Jerry's, Heineken, ING Bank, Lego, Unilever, and more, on the journey to discover and lead with purpose. In 2007, Nick began collaborating with Professor Bill George at Harvard Business School and this led them to co-author 'Finding Your True North: A Personal Guide', which became the course book for the Harvard Business School MBA class Authentic Leadership Development.

In this episode, we explore the simple questions that can help us find more purpose in our work and the easy actions we can take to live our purpose more consistently. 

Connect with Nick Craig: 

You’ll Learn:

  • [01:55] - Nick explains why he was converted from feeling cynical about purpose in workplaces to believing that it is instrumental.
  • [06:53] - Nick shares some simple questions for helping people to find more purpose in their work.
  • [08:54] - Nick explains how a purpose statement can help us to live from our purpose easily and more consistently at work.
  • [10:19] - Nick shares why purpose is not our passion, not our values, and not our happiness any why living our purpose can be challenging.
  • [13:57] - Nick explains how a growth mindset can help us to live our purpose.
  • [16:20] - Nick outlines how purpose can fuel our levels of energy at work.
  • [18:34] - Nick explains how leaders can share their sense of purpose in ways that are clear and inspiring for others.
  • [20:49] - Nick completes the Lightning round.

Your Resources:

Thanks for listening!

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.

Please leave an honest review for the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.  And don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

You can also listen to all the episodes of Making Positive Psychology Work streamed directly to your smartphone or iPad through stitcher. No need for downloading or syncing.

Until next time, take care!  Thank you Nick!

Feb 3, 2019

Today we're talking to professor James Pennebaker, who is the region's centennial chair of psychology at the University of Texas, an avid researcher, and teacher. Jamie is the originator of expressive writing and has received numerous research and teaching awards and honors for his work. He has published more than 300 articles and has been the author or editor at the 12 books, including Opening Up By Writing It Down How Expressive Writing Improves Health and is emotional pain

In this episode, we discuss the many research-based benefits of expressive writing, why it works, and the best ways to engage in this wellbeing practice at work and at home.

Connect with Jamie Pennebaker: 

You’ll Learn:

  • [02:07] - Jamie explains how he discovered the power of expressive writing and the studies he has conducted over the last thirty years to understand its impact on our wellbeing.
  • [05:07] - Jamie details the benefits thousands of studies around the world have now established for expressive writing.
  • [07:44] - Jamie shares what the research has found out about why expressive writing can beneficial for so many people.
  • [11:48] - Jamie offers some tips on how workplaces and leaders can use expressive writing to help improve people’s wellbeing in organizations.
  • [15:30] - Jamie provides practical guidance on the best ways to practice expressive writing.
  • [21:00] - Jamie offers some cautions on when and for whom expressive writing is used to try and improve people’s wellbeing.
  • [23:49] - Jamie explains how his latest research is looking at how the words we use when we write can also provide insights into our wellbeing.
  • [30:20] - Jamie completes the Lightning round.

Your Resources:

Thanks for listening!

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.

Please leave an honest review for the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.  And don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

You can also listen to all the episodes of Making Positive Psychology Work streamed directly to your smartphone or iPad through stitcher. No need for downloading or syncing.

Until next time, take care!  Thank you Jamie!

Jan 24, 2019

Today we're talking to James and Suzie Pawlekski, who are authors of the best-selling book Happy Together: Using the Science of Positive Psychology to Build Love That Lasts. James is a Professor of Practice and Director of Education in the Positive Psychology Center at the University of Pennsylvania where he co-founded the Masters of Applied Positive Psychology Program with Professor Martin Seligman. Suzie is a freelance writer and well-being consultant specializing in the science of happiness and its effects on relationships and health.

In this episode, we explore how we can build happier relationships with others at work with practical, evidence-based tips you can use to keep your passions harmonious, prioritize positive emotions, savor positive emotions and savor each other's strengths.

Connect with James & Suzie Pawelski: 

https://www.buildhappytogether.com/

You’ll Learn:

  • [01:54] - James and Suzie explain what Aristotle taught them about having better relationships as they honeymooned.
  • [05:53] - James and Suzie provide some tips for improving our more challenging relationships at work.
  • [08:46] - Suzie explains how we can promote a healthy passion for our relationships at work.
  • [10:32] - James offers some practical tips for boosting positive emotions in our relationships.
  • [13:13] - James and Suzie explain how savoring positive emotions can help to improve our relationships and practical ways we can practice this more in workplaces.
  • [15:48] - James and Suzie offer some tips for savoring strengths in others.
  • [19:16] - James and Suzie share their advice for integrating these behaviors to improve our relationships into our busy working lives.
  • [21:27] - James & Suzie completes the Lightning round.

Your Resources:

Thanks for listening!

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.

Please leave an honest review for the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.  And don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

You can also listen to all the episodes of Making Positive Psychology Work streamed directly to your smartphone or iPad through stitcher. No need for downloading or syncing.

Until next time, take care!  Thank you James & Suzie!

Jan 17, 2019

Today we're talking to Shawn Achor who's one of the world's leading experts on the connection between happiness and success. Shawn's research on mindset made the cover of the Harvard Business Review. His TED Talk is one of the most popular of all times, with over 13 million views, and his lectures airing on PBS have been seen by millions of people around the world. Shawn has worked with over a third of the Fortune 100 companies, as well as the NFL, the NBA, the Pentagon, and the White House. He is also the author of the New York Times best-selling books, "The Happiness Advantage," and "Before Happiness," and his newest book is "Big Potential."

In this episode, we explore why the biggest impediment to our success is not a lack of productivity, hard work or intelligence, but the way in which we pursue it. Shawn explains why researchers have found that it is our ability to connect with, contribute to, and benefit from the ecosystem of people around us that ultimately determines our success.

Connect with Shawn Anchor: 

http://goodthinkinc.com/

You’ll Learn:

  • [02:11] - Shawn explains why realizing our potential relies on our ability to work well with others.
  • [05:41] - Shawn outlines why studies suggest in workplaces it is not survival of the fittest, but survival of the best fit.
  • [07:54] - Shawn shares why hyper-competitive environments undermine our wellbeing and potential.
  • [10:27] - Shawn offers some practical tips for enabling survival of the best fit in our workplaces.
  • [16:41] - Shawn outlines five simple steps for we can take to help us realize our big potential.
  • [22:08] - Shawn explains how to nudge even the most skeptical people into experimenting with more collaborative and big potential behaviors in workplaces.
  • [27:07] - Shawn completes the Lightning round.

Your Resources:

Thanks for listening!

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.

Please leave an honest review for the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.  And don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

You can also listen to all the episodes of Making Positive Psychology Work streamed directly to your smartphone or iPad through stitcher. No need for downloading or syncing.

Until next time, take care!  Thank you Shawn!

Jan 10, 2019

Today we're talking to Nick Brown, who after more than 30 years of working in IT and management in various countries, completed his masters in applied positive psychology at the University of East London, and is currently working on a PhD in health psychology in the Netherlands and is a part-time personal coach.

In this episode, we explore why popular evidence-based findings including the Happiness Pie equation and the Positivity Ratio are being disproven and how we can improve our ability to understand what wellbeing research findings are really telling us. measurement. 

Connect with Nick Brown: 

Website:  Nick's Google Scholar profile

You’ll Learn:

  • [02:08] - Nick explains why the often cited Happiness Pie equation may be flawed when it comes to helping people to improve their wellbeing.
  • [03:27] - Nick shares his recommendations on what we need to more confidently understand and share a formula for happiness.
  • [05:10] - Having helped to disprove the positivity ratio, Nick shares his thoughts on how cultivating heartfelt positivity does and doesn’t improve our wellbeing.
  • [08:26] - Nick provides some simple tips to help improve our ability and confidence to understand what evidence-based research approaches are and aren’t finding.
  • [21:42] - Nick completes the Lightning round.

Your Resources:

Thanks for listening!

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.

Please leave an honest review for the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.  And don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

You can also listen to all the episodes of Making Positive Psychology Work streamed directly to your smartphone or iPad through stitcher. No need for downloading or syncing.

Until next time, take care!  Thank you Nick!

Dec 13, 2018

Pat Wadors is the Chief Talent Officer and Chief Human Resource Officer for ServiceNow. Prior to joining ServiceNow, Pat was Senior Vice President, Global Talent organization at LinkedIn, where her focus was on recruiting and developing top talent, driving organizational transformation, supporting a highly engaged workforce, and growing LinkedIn's global footprint.

In this episode, we discuss how to build inclusive and diverse workplaces where people feel like they belong so you can create psychological safety, develop people's strengths, and support growth mindsets. 

Connect with Pat Wardors: 

Website:  https://www.servicenow.com/

You’ll Learn:

  • [02:08] - Pat offers some tips for how we can teach people the skills to help them more confidently feel like they can be authentic, vulnerable and curious at work.
  • [03:27] - Pat explains how sharing gratitude stories can help people improve their relationships with each other at work.
  • [05:10] - Pat shares how she’s been exploring what it looks like to be a great place to work in really healthy ways for employees.
  • [08:26] - Pat explains how treating each other beautifully at work also requires us to know and honor our boundaries.
  • [10:55] - Pat shares why our efforts at diversity and inclusion in workplaces are still often falling short of our goals.
  • [13:54] - Pat explains how we teach managers to help their people uncover and develop their superpowers at work.
  • [16:18] - Pat offers some tips for building psychological safety in workplace teams.
  • [18:57] - Pat shares how the growth mindset methodology has been used at ServiceNow to help people learn from their failures.
  • [20:21] - Pat shares some caveats and cautions for building cultures of belonging.
  • [21:42] - Pat completes the Lightning round.

Your Resources:

Thanks for listening!

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.

Please leave an honest review for the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.  And don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

You can also listen to all the episodes of Making Positive Psychology Work streamed directly to your smartphone or iPad through stitcher. No need for downloading or syncing.

Until next time, take care!  Thank you Pat!

Dec 6, 2018

Alison Earl is the author of Tripowerment: The Why, the Will and the Way of Breakthrough Change. She works with people and companies around the globe to empower self-directed change as a  guest lecturer in Behavioral Economics at the Harvard School of Public Health and the leader of an academic and commercial think tank dedicated to solving the most complex problems in behavior change.

In this episode, we explore why feeling stressed at work isn't always bad for our wellbeing or out performance. Alison explains how our beliefs about stress impact us neurologically and shape the way we think, feel, and act. She also shares the simple steps we can take for ourselves, our teams, and our workplaces to harness more of the positive effects of stress. 

Connect with Alison Earl:

Website: https://alisonearl.com/

You’ll Learn:

  • [03:51] - Alison explains what the latest research is discovering about the impact stress can have on our wellbeing and performance at work.
  • [07:35] - Alison outlines some of the different stress responses we are each capable of experiencing and how our beliefs about stress can trigger these and impact the way we think, feel, and act.
  • [12:38] - Alison shares how our connections with others can help us to transform stress into courage.
  • [15:19] - Alison offers some practical tips for challenging our stress mindsets in the heat of the moment when stress threatens to hijack us.
  • [18:35] - Alison explains why tackling stress at work needs to be a shared responsibility between workers, teams, leaders, and organizations in order to be truly effective.
  • [21:24] - Alison shares structural approaches teams can put in place to help improve their stress responses.
  • [23:31] - Alison Completes the Lightning round.

Your Resources:

Thanks for listening!

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.

Please leave an honest review for the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.  And don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

You can also listen to all the episodes of Making Positive Psychology Work streamed directly to your smartphone or iPad through stitcher. No need for downloading or syncing.

Until next time, take care!  Thank you Alison!

Nov 29, 2018

Dr. Dan Diamond is passionate about equipping leaders to make a difference, especially when resources are scarce or times are tough. For example, Dan was the director of the medical triage unit at the New Orleans Convention Center following Hurricane Katrina, he led one of the first medical teams into Haiti following their devastating earthquake and he was deployed to the Philippines following Typhoon Yolanda. Dan has packaged all of this experience into his book Beyond Resilience, Trench-Tested Tools to Thrive When Times Are Tough and its ideas have been featured on CNN and many other media outlets around the world.

In this episode, we explore how it's possible to adapt and thrive, even under extreme circumstances at work and in life as Dan explains how tow simple questions can move us towards a thriver mindset that renews us, or a victim, bystander or controller mindset that drains us.

Connect with Dan Diamond:

Website: dandiamondmd.com

You’ll Learn:

  • [02:20] - Dan explains how power and purpose shape a thriver’s mindset and how it can improve our performance and wellbeing at work.
  • [04:23] - Dan shares how our victim, bystander, controller, and thriver mindsets get shaped and how we can free ourselves of mindsets that don’t serve us well.
  • [08:56] - Dan offers some practical steps we can take to move towards a thriver mindset more consistently at work.
  • [15:55] - Dan shares tips for how leaders can help their teams cultivate more thriver mindsets when times are tough.
  • [22.32] - Dan explains how we can be intelligent thrivers who don’t burn ourselves out in an effort to help others.
  • [24:55] - Dan Completes the Lightning round.

Your Resources:

Thanks for listening!

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.

Please leave an honest review for the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.  And don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

You can also listen to all the episodes of Making Positive Psychology Work streamed directly to your smartphone or iPad through stitcher. No need for downloading or syncing.

Until next time, take care!  Thank you Dan!

Nov 22, 2018

Dr. Heidi Wayment is a professor of social psychology at Northern Arizona University, whose research interests include psychological processes related to self-identity, self-evaluation, health behavior, and coping with stressful life events. Heidi is the co-author of Transcending Self-interest: Psychological Explorations of the Quiet Ego and has published nearly a dozen papers related to her research on this topic. In 2018, her work was recognized by a University as the most significant research in scholarly work.

In this episode, we explore how our egos shape our relationships, performance, and wellbeing at work. Heidi shares the simple steps we can take to quieten a noisy ego when needed, and how to avoid overplaying our quiet egos at work. 

Connect with Heidi Wayment:

Website: Heidi Wayment - Northern Arizona University

You’ll Learn:

  • [02:20] - Heidi explains the quiet ego and how it can impact our performance and wellbeing at work.
  • [04:23] - Heidi outlines the four characteristics of a quiet ego and how these can be applied in workplaces.
  • [08:56] - Heidi helps us understand how fear, uncertainty, and dissatisfaction can trigger our noisy egos.
  • [12:43] – Heidi explores how self-compassion can help us to quieten our noisy egos.
  • [15:55] - Heidi shares a new approach being taken in the US Military to teach leaders and their teams to quieten their egos when needed.
  • [22.32] - Heidi explores how we can avoid overplaying our quiet egos at work.
  • [24:55] - Heidi Completes the Lightning round.

Your Resources:

Thanks for listening!

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.

Please leave an honest review for the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.  And don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

You can also listen to all the episodes of Making Positive Psychology Work streamed directly to your smartphone or iPad through stitcher. No need for downloading or syncing.

Until next time, take care!  Thank you Heidi!

Nov 8, 2018

Peggy Kern is a senior lecturer at the University of Melbourne’s Graduate School of Education in the Center for Positive Psychology. Originally trained in Social-Personality and Development Psychology, Peggy's research examines the question of who flourishes in life physically, mentally and socially, and she's one of the world's leading researchers on the subject of measuring wellbeing, particularly using the PERMA pillars.

In this episode, we explore new research to understand why most wellbeing workplace measures and strategies are falling short, and the small practical changes we can make to help more people thrive at work. 

Connect with Peggy Kern:

Website: http://peggykern.org

You’ll Learn:

  • [02:43] - Peggy explains the surprising findings of a new survey on wellbeing across Australian workplaces, and what this might mean for other workplaces.
  • [08:24] - Peggy explores how our current approaches to measuring wellbeing may have unintentionally created more stigma for people who are struggling.
  • [10:58] - Peggy shares her concerns for how wellbeing is being taught in schools and what this could mean for workplaces as well.
  • [12:23] – Peggy suggests workplaces need to embrace wellbeing diversity, just as they are starting embrace neurodiversity.
  • [13:38] - Peggy explains why wellbeing is a not a solo endeavor in workplaces, and how teams and organizations impact people’s wellbeing at work.
  • [17:09] - Peggy shares some practical strategies emerging from the research that workplaces can use to help support their people’s wellbeing.
  • [20:23] - Peggy explains why workplaces shouldn’t be aiming for perfect wellbeing scores, and what they monitor instead to determine the success of their programs.
  • [22:49] - Peggy Completes the Lightning round.

Your Resources:

Thanks for listening!

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.

Please leave an honest review for the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.  And don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

You can also listen to all the episodes of Making Positive Psychology Work streamed directly to your smartphone or iPad through stitcher. No need for downloading or syncing.

Until next time, take care!  Thank you Peggy!

Nov 8, 2018

Today’s Guest:

Peggy Kern is a senior lecturer at the University of Melbourne’s Graduate School of Education in the Center for Positive Psychology. Originally trained in Social-Personality and Development Psychology, Peggy's research examines the question of who flourishes in life physically, mentally and socially, and she's one of the world's leading researchers on the subject of measuring wellbeing, particularly using the PERMA pillars.

In this episode, we explore some side-effects of wellbeing measures in workplaces, and how to avoid them. 

Connect with Peggy Kern:

Website: http://peggykern.org

You’ll Learn:

  • [02:43] - Peggy explains the surprising findings of a new survey on wellbeing across Australian workplaces, and what this might mean for other workplaces.
  • [08:24] - Peggy explores how our current approaches to measuring wellbeing may have unintentionally created more stigma for people who are struggling.
  • [10:58] - Peggy shares her concerns for how wellbeing is being taught in schools and what this could mean for workplaces as well.
  • [12:23] – Peggy suggests workplaces need to embrace wellbeing diversity, just as they are starting embrace neurodiversity.
  • [13:38] - Peggy explains why wellbeing is a not a solo endeavor in workplaces, and how teams and organizations impact people’s wellbeing at work.
  • [17:09] - Peggy shares some practical strategies emerging from the research that workplaces can use to help support their people’s wellbeing.
  • [20:23] - Peggy explains why workplaces shouldn’t be aiming for perfect wellbeing scores, and what they monitor instead to determine the success of their programs.
  • [22:49] - Peggy Completes the Lightning round.

Your Resources:

Thanks for listening!

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.

Please leave an honest review for the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.  And don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

You can also listen to all the episodes of Making Positive Psychology Work streamed directly to your smartphone or iPad through stitcher. No need for downloading or syncing.

Until next time, take care!  Thank you Peggy!

Nov 1, 2018

Today we’re talking to Zach Mercurio, whose research, teaching and consulting on how purpose and meaningfulness can help individuals and organizations unleash human potential to produce tangible results, has been applied to transform Fortune 500 companies, non-profits, schools, and universities around the world. Zach is the best selling author of “The Invisible Leader: Transform Your Life, Work, and Organization with the Power of Authentic Purpose,”

In this episode, we explore why what’s possible when purpose becomes the boss of our choices in workplaces and the practical steps you, your team and your organization can take to genuinely put meaning and purpose at the heart of what you do each day.

Connect with Zach:

Website:  https://www.zachmercurio.com/

You’ll Learn:

  • [01:51] - Zach explains why purpose has become a priority in workplaces over the last few years.
  • [03:48] - Zach studies are finding a focus on purpose impacts the bottom-line in workplaces.
  • [06:05] - Zach explains why-washing has become a problem in some workplaces and how we can avoid it.
  • [07:53] - Zach outlines why purpose is a process and the pathway to purpose that workplaces can follow based on his research.
  • [11:38] - Zach explains how leaders can ensure their choices and actions remain aligned to their organization’s purpose even in a dynamic, complex and unpredictable world.
  • [13:53] - Zach provides an example of how leaders can keep the purpose of their organization front-of-mind as they make decisions.
  • [17:07] - Zach explains what we can do practically to be more purpose-focused – no matter what our role - if our organization isn’t yet clear on its purpose.
  • [19:17] - Zach offers some tips to help us deliver on our organization’s purpose more consistently.
  • [24:03] - Zach completes the lightning round.

Your Resources:

Thanks for listening!

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.

Please leave an honest review for the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.  And don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

You can also listen to all the episodes of Making Positive Psychology Work streamed directly to your smartphone or iPad through stitcher. No need for downloading or syncing.

Until next time, take care!  Thank you Zach!

Oct 25, 2018

Today we’re talking to Tamra Chandler who is the founder and CEO of PeopleFirm, one of Forbes Magazine’s 2018 America’s Best Management Consulting firms. A nationally recognized thought leader, author, and speaker, Tamra has spent most of her thirty-year career developing new and effective ways for people and their organizations to perform at their peak. In 2016, she wrote the acclaimed book, “How Performance Management is Killing Performance and What to Do About It.”

In this episode, we explore how existing performance management practices are often not only ineffective but detrimental in workplaces and why leaders hang on to them.  Tamra helps us to explore the alternatives and how focusing on strengths, building our growth mindiset feedback muscles and improving psychological safety with coaching focused development conversations can help people thrive in their roles.

Connect with Tamra:

Website:  http://www.peoplefirm.com/

You’ll Learn:

  • [02:23] - Tamra explains why she's found that performance management processes are generally killing performance in workplaces.
  • [05:55] - Tamra shares how performance conversations can help people to develop their strengths and improve psychological safety.
  • [08:46] - Tamra explains why despite all the evidence we have about helping people to thrive at work, organizations continue to persist with performance management approaches that are ineffective.
  • [11:49] - Tamra outlines the steps workplaces and leaders can take to improve their performance management processes.
  • [14:42] - Tamra explains why managers struggle to accurately rate most people’s performance at work.
  • [16:05] - Tamra suggests rating how managers feel about their people’s future potential is a better way to assess people’s talent in workplaces and why these conversations should be transparent.
  • [18:17] - Tamra explains why workplaces need to arm people with the courage and capability to seek more feedback on their own.
  • [20:41] - Tamra provides some tips on what leaders can do to improve people’s performance – regardless of their workplace's performance management systems.
  • [23:15] - Tamra completes the lightning round.

Your Resources:

Thanks for listening!

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.

Please leave an honest review for the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.  And don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

You can also listen to all the episodes of Making Positive Psychology Work streamed directly to your smartphone or iPad through stitcher. No need for downloading or syncing.

Until next time, take care!  Thank you Tamra!

Oct 18, 2018

 

Today we’re talking to Fred Luthans, who is a distinguished professor of management emirates at the University of Nebraska, Lincoln, and whose research is focused on what he founded and has turned to positive organizational behavior and psychological capital. A former president of the Academy of Management, Fred has received many awards, edited three top journals, authored several well-known books, and over 250 academic articles and chapters, and lectured in most countries around the world.

In this episode, we explore how Fred led the creation of the concept of Psychological Capital, the impact of building the psychological resources of hope, optimism, resilience and efficacy, and how this can be achieved in workplaces.

Connect with Fred:

Website:  https://business.unl.edu/people/fluthans

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You’ll Learn:

  • [03:14] - Fred explains what psychological capital is and how the concept emerged for improving resilience in workplaces.
  • [08:38] - Fred shares what researchers around the world have been learning about the benefits of building psychological capital in workplaces.
  • [13:18] - Fred shares tips on how psychological capital can be practically developed for people in workplaces.
  • [16:37] - Fred shares how sustainability boosters can help people to build and maintain their levels of psychological capital.
  • [19:47] - Fred explains why PsyCap has been found to have more impact in the United States and in services industries.
  • [23:36] - Fred shares some of the other positive psychological resources that studies have found also impact resilience and wellbeing in the workplace.
  • [25:07] - Fred completes the lightning round.

Your Resources:

Thanks for listening!

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.

Please leave an honest review for the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.  And don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

You can also listen to all the episodes of Making Positive Psychology Work streamed directly to your smartphone or iPad through stitcher. No need for downloading or syncing.

Until next time, take care!  Thank you Fred!

Oct 11, 2018

 

Today we’re talking to Peter Bregman who, for the last 30 years, has helped CEO’s and senior leaders to develop their leadership skills, build aligned collaborative teams, and overcome obstacles to drive results for their organizations. The host of the acclaimed Bregman Leadership podcast, Peter’s a regular contributor to the Harvard Business Review and an award-winning, best selling author. His most recent book is Leading with Emotional Courage, How to Have Hard Conversations, Create Accountability and Inspire Action on Your Most Important Work.

In this episode, we discuss how to build people’s emotional courage so they can better navigate all of their emotions at work, willingly hold kind and hard conversations, and create more of the outcomes they want.

Connect with Peter:

Website:  http://bregmanpartners.com/

You’ll Learn:

  • [02:06] - Peter explains why leaders need to understand that emotions are the fuel that energizes our focus at work.
  • [06:22] - Peter explores if hard conversations can also be kind conversations at work.
  • [10:48] - Peter shares how to lead into a kind conversation that’s hard to have with others.
  • [14:14] - Peter explains why reducing our sense of power can help to build trust in our relationships.
  • [19:28] - Peter outlines why reverting to old behaviors can be the best way to become more of who we want to be at work.
  • [25:03] - Peter completes the lightning round.

Your Resources:

Thanks for listening!

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.

Please leave an honest review for the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.  And don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

You can also listen to all the episodes of Making Positive Psychology Work streamed directly to your smartphone or iPad through stitcher. No need for downloading or syncing.

Until next time, take care!  Thank you Peter!

Oct 5, 2018

 

Today we’re talking to Nicholas Epley, a professor of behavioral science at the University of Chicago Booth School of Business whose research explores social cognition, and how people think about other people, to understand why smart people so routinely misunderstand each other. His research has appeared in more than two dozen empirical journals, has been featured by the New York Times and the Wall Street Journal among many other media outlets and he’s the author of Mindwise, How We Understand What Others Think, Believe, Feel and Want.

In this episode, we discuss how your brain’s ability to understand what others think, believe, feel and want helps you to connect with others.  Nick also explains how this often goes wrong at work due to over-confidence that results in interpersonal misunderstandings and what you can do to improve your ability to mind read when it comes to your relationships.

Connect with Nick:

Website:  http://faculty.chicagobooth.edu/nicholas.epley/

 

You’ll Learn:

  • [01:57] - Nick explains how we all have a sixth sense that can help us to read each other’s minds.
  • [03:28] - Nick shares why our ability to read the minds of others is vital for our ability to thrive in the world.
  • [05:08] - Nick explains how our ability to read each other’s minds can often go wrong at work.
  • [07:48] - Nick shares what his research has found about how our tendencies for social interpersonal misunderstandings can shape our relationships and our actions at work.
  • [09:57] - Nick explains why interpreting people’s intent in our relationships can be so challenging.
  • [11:31] - Nick explores how our ability to mind read at work could impact people’s levels of psychological safety.
  • [13:15] - Nick shares what his research has found can help us to mind read more effectively.
  • [18:09] - Nick explores how staying out of judgment, and sitting in curiosity might help us to get perspective and be better mindreaders.
  • [19:33] - Nick outlines the findings from his recent research on why people are often reluctant to express gratitude to each other.
  • [23:53] - Nick completes the lightning round.

Your Resources:

Thanks for listening!

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.

Please leave an honest review for the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.  And don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

You can also listen to all the episodes of Making Positive Psychology Work streamed directly to your smartphone or iPad through stitcher. No need for downloading or syncing.

Until next time, take care!  Thank you Nick!

Sep 29, 2018

Today we’re talking to Robyn Stratton-Berkessel, who’s an adjunct professor in the School of Management at Champlain College, where she teaches online in the positive organizational development MBA programme. She’s the author of Appreciative Inquiry for Collaborative Solutions, hosts the popular Positivity Strategist Podcast, and is an advisor on various appreciative inquiry initiatives, for organizations all over the world.

In this episode, we explore how positivity is improved in workplaces when people are given a voice using participative approaches like Appreciative Inquiry and how leaders can learn to feel confident about these generative approaches.

Connect with Robyn:

Website:  positivitystrategist.com

You’ll Learn:

  • [02:18] - Robyn explains the characteristics of a positive workplace.
  • [04:45] - Robyn shares how we can help leaders feel more confident about the benefits of giving people a voice when it comes to improving positivity in workplaces.
  • [07:37] - Robyn shares an example of how Appreciative Inquiry can be used to help cynics with diverse views find a meaningful way forward together.
  • [10:56] - Robyn explains how we can craft generative questions that help people to see old things in new ways.
  • [13:50] - Robyn explains why appreciative inquiry is more than simply always talking about the positive.
  • [16:24] - Robyn shares how workplaces can harness the opportunity and power of self-organization as one of the outcomes of an Appreciative Inquiry experience.
  • [18:34] - Robyn offers some caveats and cautions about when an Appreciative Inquiry approach might now work so well.
  • [20:07] - Robyn talks about the importance of not using an Appreciative Inquiry approach to gloss over difficult or painful conversations in workplaces.
  • [23:02] - Robyn completes the lightning round.

Your Resources:

Thanks for listening!

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.

Please leave an honest review for the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.  And don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

You can also listen to all the episodes of Making Positive Psychology Work streamed directly to your smartphone or iPad through stitcher. No need for downloading or syncing.

Until next time, take care!  Thank you Robyn!

Sep 21, 2018

Today we’re talking to Dan Cable, a Professor of Organisational Behaviour at London Business School and whose research and teaching focuses on employee engagement, change, organizational culture, leadership mindset, and the linkage between brands and employee behaviors. An award-winning researcher, Dan has published more than 50 articles in scientific journals, been extensively featured in business publications around the world, and the author of several books, the latest being ‘Alive at Work’. Dan’s clients include Deloitte, McDonald’s, Twitter, and many more.

In this episode, we explore how workplaces can harness people’s neurological seeking system to help them bring their best selves to work each day and why self-expression, serious play and purpose can help us to achieve what we’re truly capable of doing while looking after our wellbeing.

Connect with Dan:

Website:  dan-cable.com

You’ll Learn:

  • [02:33] - Dan explains why researchers continue to find why many employees still feel like they can’t really be their best selves at work each day, even after almost 20 years of positive psychology research and applications in workplaces.
  • [05:25] - Dan shares why finding ways to harness our brains seeking systems is one of the keys to helping people bring their best selves to work each day.
  • [10:24] - Dan outlines how we can help leaders better understand the impact of fear on people’s behaviors and their ability to bring their best selves to work.
  • [14:44] - Dan explains the importance of encouraging playfulness in workplaces in order to trigger our seeking systems and bring our best selves to work.
  • [17:51] - Dan shares his tips on how to help leaders and teams leverage storytelling to make their work more purposeful.
  • [20:31] - Dan shares his evidence-based interventions for helping people to bring their best selves to work more often.
  • [23:14] - Dan offers some important cautions about helping people to bring their best selves to work in a way that is good for them and good for others.
  • [27:41] - Dan completes the lightning round.

Your Resources:

Thanks for listening!

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.

Please leave an honest review for the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.  And don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

You can also listen to all the episodes of Making Positive Psychology Work streamed directly to your smartphone or iPad through stitcher. No need for downloading or syncing.

Until next time, take care!  Thank you Dan!

Sep 14, 2018

Today we’re talking to Rob Baker, who’s a specialist at bringing positive psychology to workplaces, and strives to be a force for good in the world of work. A graduate of the Masters of Applied Positive Psychology programme at Melbourne University, Rob is the founder and chief positive deviant of a leading evidence-based positive psychology, well-being, and HR consultancy called Tailored Thinking. His ideas and research on how people can personalize work and bring their whole and best selves to the workplace have been presented at academic and professional conferences around the world.

In this episode, we discuss how job crafting and in particular micro-crafting (small changes to what you do each day) can help you to align your work with your strengths, interests and passions to help you balance the demands of your job and feel more engaged, satisfied and effective at work.

Connect with Rob:

Website:  tailoredthinking.co.uk/

You’ll Learn:

  • [02:15] - Rob explains what job crafting is and how it might help us at work
  • [03:30] - Rob explains what researchers are finding out about the potential benefits of job crafting for employees and for workplaces.
  • [05:45] - Rob explains why we need more flexible approaches to job descriptions as many jobs continue to become more complex and unpredictable.
  • [06:38] - Rob shares practical examples of how people can engage in task crafting, relational crafting and purpose crafting at work.
  • [10:35] - Rob offers simple steps for micro crafting your job.
  • [14:15] - Rob explores how on-the-spot job crafting may benefit people as they go about their jobs.
  • [16:09] - Rob explains how leaders can help their people to job craft.
  • [18:11] - Rob offers some cautions on when job crafting is likely to be less effective in workplaces.
  • [21:07] - Rob completes the lightning round.

Your Resources:

 

Thanks for listening!

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.

Please leave an honest review for the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.  And don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

You can also listen to all the episodes of Making Positive Psychology Work streamed directly to your smartphone or iPad through stitcher. No need for downloading or syncing.

Until next time, take care!  Thank you Rob!

Sep 7, 2018

Today we’re talking to Dr. Fred Luskin, who founded and currently serves as Director of the Stanford University Forgiveness Projects. Fred is also a senior consultant in Health Promotion and Wellness at Stanford University’s health center, where he teaches classes on positive psychology, the art and science of meditation, forgiveness, wellness, flourishing, and the psychology of storytelling to undergraduate and graduate students, and conducts numerous workshops and staff development trainings in relationship enhancement, stress management, and positive psychology through the Stanford Be Well program. He’s the author of several best-selling books, including Forgive For Good: A Proven Prescription for Health and Happiness, and has been interviewed by mere outlets around the world.

In this episode, we discuss how forgiveness can help to improve our wellbeing, grit and psychological safety at work.

Connect with Fred:

Website:  https://learningtoforgive.com/

You’ll Learn:

  • [02:02] - Fred explains the value of forgiveness in workplaces.
  • [02:51] - Fred shares how the Stanford Forgiveness Project has helped to improve forgiveness in workplaces.
  • [04:48] - Fred outline why it can be hard to forgive others at work.
  • [06:41] - Fred explains the two practices that work best when it comes to improving our ability to forgive at work.
  • [09:08] - Fred outlines the H.E.A.L method for forgiveness.
  • [12:13] - Fred explains how forgiveness can impact our levels of grit and resilience.
  • [13:08] - Fred shares how forgiveness shapes our relationships at work.
  • [16:20] - Fred explores how important it is for us to be able to forgive ourselves.
  • [17:30] - Fred shares his thoughts on the intersection of forgiveness and psychological safety.
  • [18:20] - Fred explains how we can intelligently forgive at work so we don’t get taken advantage of.
  • [20:12] - Fred shares some of the bottom-line outcomes he has found in workplaces who teach the skills of forgiveness.
  • [21:43] - Fred completes the lightning round.

Your Resources:

Thanks for listening!

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.

Please leave an honest review for the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.  And don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

You can also listen to all the episodes of Making Positive Psychology Work streamed directly to your smartphone or iPad through stitcher. No need for downloading or syncing.

Until next time, take care!  Thank you Fred!

Aug 31, 2018

Today we’re talking to Darren Coppin, who is a Ph.D. researcher and businessman, who implements positive psychology methods, not because of any deep-seated faith in the movement’s principles, but because it works. Darren’s mother is an outrageous hippy who is at one with the universe, so Darren over-zealously tries to ensure that everything he says and does is evidence-based. In that vein, since 2014, over 105000 people have been through his government-funded model to increase the return to work rates for welfare recipients, and these tools are now being adopted by higher education and apprenticeship institutions around the world.

In this episode, we discuss how to optimize people’s motivation and resilience for work.

Connect with Darren:

Website:  Darren Coppin on LinkedIn

You’ll Learn:

  • [02:01] - Darren explains how the motivation for behavior change is often misunderstood in workplaces.
  • [03:26] - Darren shares how he’s applied the principles of behavior change to help long-term unemployed people find work.
  • [06:23] - Darren outlines how he’s applied the principles for motivation to help secure funding for his program from key stakeholders.
  • [08:45] - Darren shares what his research has found about the most effective positive psychology practices for improving resilience and accomplishment for job seekers.
  • [10:49] - Darren explains why fusing resilience interventions and coaching can be a powerful way to create behavior change.
  • [14:43] - Darren explains how workplaces can provide the right type of support at the right time to improve people’s resilience.
  • [16:12] - Darren explains how workplaces can better support people’s levels of resilience.
  • [20:28] - Darren shares the impact teaching resilience skills to long-term unemployed job seekers has been having.
  • [21:23] - Darren completes the lightning round.

Your Resources:

Thanks for listening!

Thanks so much for joining me again this week.  If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.

Please leave an honest review for the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.  And don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free!

You can also listen to all the episodes of Making Positive Psychology Work streamed directly to your smartphone or iPad through stitcher. No need for downloading or syncing.

Until next time, take care!  Thank you Darren!

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