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Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast

If you believe as I do that by uncovering tested, practical ways to help people move from functioning to flourishing at work, we can better navigate the incredible challenges and opportunities our world faces, then this podcast is for you. My goal each week is to give you access to the world’ leading positive psychology, positive organizational scholarship and neuroscience researchers and practitioners to explore their latest research findings on how you can improve wellbeing, develop strengths, nurture positive relationships, make work meaningful and cultivate the grit to accomplish what matters most. If you want evidence-based approaches to bringing out the best in yourself and others at work, then consider this podcast your step-by-step guide.
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Oct 13, 2016

Neil Garrett is a cognitive neuroscientist at the University College London. His research investigates the mechanisms by which individuals learn information about the world and the factors that influence learning processes.

Neil Garrett’s website: http://neilgarrett.org/

In this conversation, Neil shares that research suggests that our brains may be wired for optimism. People tend to over-estimate the likelihood of positive events in the future and under-estimate the likelihood of negative events in the future. Although this is not the case with everyone, as there are external factors that can influence this in individuals.

Neil’s findings can help leaders determine the best ways to deliver information in workplaces. There are some negatives that come from this optimism and Neil talks about what those negatives are and explains the necessary balance that needs to happen.

You’ll Learn:

  • [01:27] - Neil shares some takeaways from his presentation at the European Conference on Positive Psychology.
  • [02:13] - According to Neil, research suggests that our brains are wired for optimism. However, this can be influenced by factors such as depression, stress, and anxiety.
  • [03:21] - Neil talks about what is going on neurologically as our brain interprets good and bad information.
  • [05:10] - This filtering of information encourages motivation, but can lead to risk-taking.
  • [05:52] - Neil says that the role of genetics in this process is not yet known.
  • [06:31] - Neil talks about how his findings can influence the workplace.
  • [08:15] - Neil discusses how leaders can use this information to deliver information.
  • [09:47] - Neil talks about the impact technology can have on harnessing our brain’s activity.
  • [10:57] - Neil shares some of his current research, which involves work with firefighters.
  • [12:21] - Neil talks more about the negatives of this optimism, such as risk-taking behaviors and ignoring warning signs.
  • [13:34] - The Lightning Round with Neil Garrett

Your Resources:

The Great Brain Experiment (app)

What I Talk About When I Talk About Running - Haruki Murakami

Sweet Tooth: A Novel - Ian McEwan

Daily Rituals: How Artists Work - Mason Currey

European Conference on Positive Psychology

Positive Psychology Program

Thanks for listening!

Thanks so much for joining me again this week. If you enjoyed this episode, please share it using the social media buttons you see at the bottom of this post.

Also, please leave an honest review for the Making Positive Psychology Work Podcast on iTunes. Ratings and reviews are extremely helpful and greatly appreciated. They do matter in the rankings of the show, and I read each and every one of them.

And finally, don’t forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes to get automatic updates. It’s free! Special thanks to Sue for joining me this week. Until next time, take care!

Until next time, take care!

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